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Find below the Official Schedule v1.0 (as of March 24, 2016). Slight changes may be made over the coming week — including session descriptions, panelist bios and room locations. Be sure to click on "Attendees" to see who’s coming and set up a personal profile. You can then select the sessions you wish to attend and create your own customized RightsCon schedule. Visit our RightsCon site for more details.
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Wednesday, March 30
 

9:00am

Lessons from the frontlines of global activism
Speakers
avatar for Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa

co-Founder, SaveTheInternet.in
Founder and Editor - MediaNama.com; co-founder SavetheInternet.in/Internet Freedom Foundation


Wednesday March 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Slate

9:00am

State of the Internet, Freedom of Expression and the Challenges of 2016
TBA

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for Dunja Mijatovic

Dunja Mijatovic

OSCE Representative, Freedom of the Media
Dunja Mijatović was appointed in 2010 by the Ministerial Council of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) as the Representative on Freedom of the Media. The Council gave her a political mandate to protect and promote freedom of expression and freedom of the media in the 57 OSCE participating States. For more than two decades she worked on human rights, media law and regulation, institution building in transition... Read More →
FL

Frank La Rue

Assistant Director General for Communication and Information at UNESCO


Wednesday March 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Lab

9:00am

Opening Ceremonies
Bringing together legends of the internet and moderated by Access Now's Executive Director, Brett Solomon, the Opening Ceremony will frame the conference as a whole by speaking to its collaborative structure and its importance in strategizing on current and emerging issues in digital rights from Net Discrimination to Privacy and Digital Security, from Digital Inclusion and Internet Governance to Freedom of Expression.

The Opening will feature remarks from Brad Smith (President and Chief Legal Officer of Microsoft). In addition to a few surprises, the Opening will also feature a global lineup of Nighat Dad (Founder of Digital Rights Foundation), Bruce Schneier (internationally renowned cryptographer), Malkia Cyril (Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice), Salil Shetty (Secretary General of Amnesty International), and Mitchell Baker (Chairwoman of Mozilla). 

Speakers
avatar for Mitchell Baker

Mitchell Baker

Chairwoman, Mozilla
Winifred Mitchell Baker, better known simply as Mitchell Baker, is the Executive Chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation and of Mozilla Corporation, a subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation that coordinates development of the open source Mozilla Internet applications, including the Mozilla Firefox web browser and the Mozilla Thunderbird email client. | | Baker was trained as a lawyer. She coordinates business and policy issues and sits on both the... Read More →
avatar for Malkia Cyril

Malkia Cyril

Executive Director, Center for Media Justice
Malkia A. Cyril is founder and Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice (CMJ) and co-founder of the Media Action Grassroots Network, a national network of community-based organizations working to ensure racial and economic justice in a digital age. A prolific writer and public speaker, Cyril's articles and quotes-- on issues from Net Neutrality and surveillance to the communication rights of prisoners and new strategic communications... Read More →
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is a Pakistani lawyer and Internet activist who founded the not-for-profit organisation Digital Rights Foundation. In 2015, she was named in the TIME magazine's list of next generation leaders, for helping Pakistani women fight online harassment. | Dad led campaigns to protect online freedom of speech in Pakistan as well campaigns against legislation that gives the government broad powers of surveillance online, most notable one is the... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier

Security technologist, cryptographer, privacy specialist, and author
Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a "security guru" by The Economist. He is the author of 13 books -- including "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World" -- as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His influential newsletter "Crypto-Gram" and his blog "Schneier on Security" are read by over 250,000 people. He has testified before Congress... Read More →
avatar for Salil Shetty

Salil Shetty

Secretary General, Amnesty International
Salil Shetty joined Amnesty International as the organization’s eighth Secretary General in July 2010. A long-term activist on poverty and justice, Salil Shetty leads the movement's worldwide work to end human rights violations. Prior to joining Amnesty International, Salil Shetty was Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign from 2003 to 2010. He played a pivotal role in building the global advocacy campaign for the achievement... Read More →
avatar for Brad Smith

Brad Smith

President and Chief Legal Officer, Microsoft
In this role Smith is responsible for the company’s corporate, external, and legal affairs. He leads a team of more than 1,300 business, legal and corporate affairs professionals working in 55 countries. These teams are responsible for the company’s legal work, its intellectual property portfolio, patent licensing business, corporate philanthropy, government affairs, public policy, corporate governance, and social responsibility work... Read More →
avatar for Brett Solomon

Brett Solomon

Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now
Brett Solomon is the co-founder and Executive Director of Access—a non-profit human rights organization focused on digital freedom. The Access mission is to ensure open global internet access and an uncensored and secure digital sphere, working to create a world where citizens can be active participants in their future by freely seeking, receiving and imparting information digitally. Prior to Access, he was the Campaign Director at the... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
*The Hub*

10:30am

Intermediary Liability - Balancing Creative Freedom with Protecting Rights
In the past decade or so, many content hosting intermediaries took down by default as little as possible, in the name of openness, free speech, and non-intervention, and underwritten by the broad immunity provided by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. With increased attention to online harassment, hate speech, public shaming, and intimidation, however, it seems that intermediaries are changing course and doing more than the minimum required by CDA 230.  Likewise, Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act provides intermediaries with immunity for copyright infringement based on user content, so long as the platforms follow the notice-take down procedure. But this take down procedure is often abused by rightsholders to the effect of stifling creative expression that is protected by fair use or is simply non-infringing. In response to this trend, some intermediaries are similarly changing course to scrutinize the merits of take down notices in order to minimize such abuses, at the risk of losing their immunity.    

This panel, moderated by Mike Masnick of Techdirt and comprised of lawyers from Meetup, Change.org, and Medium, will focus on the question of - what next? It will address issues including:
  • How are intermediaries trying to create fair, scalable, and sustainable processes that balance users’ freedom of online expression with their freedom from harassment and intimidation and abusive assertion of copyright?
  • How intermediaries use policy to foster the kind of community they want on their platforms  (ie, a code of conduct can aim for higher standards than mere compliance with applicable law)
  • How intermediaries deal with one off decisions versus fear of creating jurisprudence (e.g. if we consider this particular sentence as hate speech, what else do we need to take down?)
  • What legal, normative, and technological strategies do they draw on?
  • How intermediaries treat defamation and IP claims from outside the U.S.? (how intermediaries deal with wanting brand conformity across the globe but need to take into account local laws and local culture)
  • How should intermediaries approach trademark claims, which are outside the scope of the copyright regime of the DMCA

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Eve Chaurand

Eve Chaurand

General Counsel & Secretary, Change.org
AF

Alex Feerst

Fellow, Stanford Law School's Center for Internet & Society
avatar for David Pashman

David Pashman

General Counsel, Meetup
David Pashman is General Counsel of Meetup, the world's largest network of local groups with 25 million members and 225,000 local groups meeting face-to-face. Prior to joining Meetup, David was a senior corporate associate in the New York office of Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati, where he advised internet and technology companies in connection with operating issues, venture capital financings, mergers and acquisitions and IPOs. David is an... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Slate

10:30am

The Changing Ecosystem of Media Delivery
Delivering media content is becoming ever more challenging. Information controls implemented at a national or local level have made it in some cases nearly impossible to reach and engage with consumers of broadcast and media content.

We are bringing together a panel that represents international broadcasters, independent media and filmmakers to talk about their challenges in providing content to their audiences. Focusing on Iran, we will look at how people in the country are accessing international news, information and streaming media, while seeing services they trust blocked online and satellite signals jammed. We will consider what role can be played by content owners in reaching this audience and keeping them connected.

The panellists will discuss how traditional delivery models need to adapt in this new distribution environment, and what the different types of content provider can learn from each other in reaching their audience. We will discuss how "mobile first" strategies could help, and how important it is to engage with the audience the content owners are trying to reach.

Speakers
avatar for Sepideh Farsi

Sepideh Farsi

Born in Tehran, Sepideh Farsi moved to Paris to study mathematics, but soon drifted towards film. After some shorts, her documentary “HOMI SETHNA, FILMMAKER” won several awards. Followed by “HARAT” and “TEHRAN WITHOUT PERMISSION”, which both premiered in Locarno. Her first two features DREAMS OF DUST and THE GAZE premiered in Rotterdam. She then directed THE HOUSE UNDER THE WATER, followed by RED ROSE, which... Read More →
avatar for Karl Kathuria

Karl Kathuria

CEO, Psiphon
Karl Kathuria is the CEO of Psiphon Inc. He manages business relationships with broadcasters and organizations that Psiphon is working with, as well as looking for new partnership opportunities, and developing the strategies for increasing use of Psiphon in key geographic regions. | | Prior to joining Psiphon, Karl spent over 10 years working with broadcasters and technology companies, managing Internet distribution and streaming media... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Engine

10:30am

Inside the Mind of a Venture Capitalist
Before Facebook, Twitter, Uber, and Yelp became powerhouses and mainstays around the world, they required funding and support to survive. Enter the Silicon Valley venture capitalist, the individual who has first access to some of the most promising and newly emerging tech companies in the world.
But does this great power come with an equally great responsibility to guide a company's public policy positionings? What role, if any, does the venture capitalist come to bear in ensuring the privacy and security of a fledging company's future users?
This session will examine the civic, moral, and economic responsibilities and consequences in venture capitalism in ignoring - or supporting - the human rights of future users and in securing the future of its investment. It will examine how questions of privacy, security, freedom of expression, and other fundamental rights online have been elevated in public debate in the past few years, and whether it is in the venture capitalist's best interests to engage with these issues from a financial and governance perspective. Find out who's funding what, whether there are any red lines, and what the issues at play are. 

Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Fishbowl

10:30am

Shining a Light on Trade Agreements and Closed-Door Digital Policymaking
As Internet­-related policy questions are increasingly being decided through trade negotiations, there exists a deep tension between the historical secrecy of negotiating trade agreements and the expectation that global Internet policy issues ought to be be discussed through open multi-stakeholder processes. Most controversially, the lack of transparency and exclusion of civil society from trade negotiations have led to human rights considerations being left by the wayside.

This panel will explore this tension as we outline the trade process and highlight some of the specific digital policy issues that appear in modern trade deals. We will present ideas and strategies on ways to improve transparency in the this policymaking space, and invite the audience to contribute their ideas on opportunities to implement concrete and actionable strategies for institutional change.

Speakers
avatar for Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic

Legal and Policy Director, Public Citizen
avatar for Maira Sutton

Maira Sutton

Global Policy Analyst, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Maira leads international campaigns on copyright, innovation, and access to knowledge issues, including opposing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement. She also tracks how the overreach of copyright can be used to hinder access to knowledge and silence criticism and news online.


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Fireside

10:30am

Enough talk about the problem, what’s the solution: How do we connect the next African billion?
Panel Summary

Focusing on the issue of connectivity first as part of internet governance and access as a right, this panel aims to bring together knowledge holders to suggest solutions in ensuring the connection of the next billion in Africa. The panel will be held under a hypothetical understanding that all resources are at hand for the experts and they can go on to state how connecting those in Africa is possible. The panel will be encouraged to look at issues of connectivity and access from a supply and demand side and affordability perspective. Other perspectives of ensuring connectivity will be welcome at the panel. 


Speakers:
Chenai Chair- Research ICT Africa
Hanna Boujemi-IGMENA
Riva Jalipa- Article 19
Mohamed El Gohary-Global Voices
Jochai Ben-Avie-Mozilla

Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Nest

10:30am

A human rights approach to cybersecurity
This session will be examining the potential to take a human rights approach to cybersecurity, which is becoming one of the dominant frameworks through which governments are approaching internet policy.  The session will look at the proposition that the notion of cybersecurity should be rooted in the security of the user not the systems.  It will also examine the feasibility of developing a genuinely multi-stakeholder approach to developing cybersecurity policy.  

Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for Chris Riley

Chris Riley

Head of Public Policy, Mozilla
I operate in the area of Internet policy, coming from a law and technology background. My motivation is the belief that an open Internet delivers tremendous socioeconomic benefits, and that if we as a global society don't "get" Internet policy more often than not, those benefits will go away. That path took me from computer science, to copyright, to telecom, to Internet freedom, presenting me with many opportunities to do some interesting and... Read More →
avatar for Uri Rosenthal

Uri Rosenthal

Dutch Special Envoy for Cyberspace, Government of Netherlands
He served as Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Cabinet Rutte I from 14 October 2010 until 5 November 2012. He previously served as a Member of the Senate from 8 June 1999 until 14 October 2010 and the Parliamentary leader in the Senate from 5 May 2005 until 14 October 2010. A professor of political science and public administration by occupation, he taught from 1980 until 2010 at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and the Leiden University.
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Lab

10:30am

Big data breaches: the tipping point for trust?
The number of data breaches for organisations (both business and government) seems to be increasing in frequency and severity, exposing sensitive data from users across the globe.

Examples include massive theft of credit card information from major Korean banks in 2014; disclosure of e-mails, personnel data and unreleased movies after an intrusion in Sony Pictures Entertainment’s network the same year; theft of data from over 20 million civil servants following an intrusion in the US Office of Personel Management’s information system in 2015. Whether we believe these projections or not, there are estimates that the effect of cyberattacks on the Internet could cost the world up to $90 trillion by 2030.

* Is this scenario avoidable?
* Are organisations taking all necessary steps to protect their users' data? And, if not, why not?
* Are there differences of practices between pure ICT players and non-ICT actors dealing with user data?
* In economic terms, does the economic value of personal data outweighs the costs and risks associated with the management of large amounts of user data?

We want first to discuss these points, identify any themes in the causes of these breaches, and then discuss the economic reasons that the organisations may not implementing best practices for stopping the attacks.

Moderators
avatar for Nicolas Seidler

Nicolas Seidler

Senior Policy advisor, The Internet Society
Nicolas Seidler is Senior Policy Advisor at the Internet Society. He joined the organization in February 2010 and currently leads ISOC’s work on Internet and Human Rights issues. He also engages in key global Internet governance issues and processes. | | Nicolas works with a broad spectrum of international partners, global policy makers and non-governmental stakeholders on a range of Internet issues. In this role he contributes to ISOC's... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Drew Mitnick

Drew Mitnick

Policy Counsel, Access Now
avatar for Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier

Security technologist, cryptographer, privacy specialist, and author
Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a "security guru" by The Economist. He is the author of 13 books -- including "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World" -- as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His influential newsletter "Crypto-Gram" and his blog "Schneier on Security" are read by over 250,000 people. He has testified before Congress... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Cottage

10:30am

The Right to be Forgotten: Remembering Freedom of Expression
What and whom should the Internet forget? Who should decide? Can search engines be trusted as the guardians and censors of the online world? How are individual interests best protected on the internet? How can we strike the balance between privacy and freedom of expression online? Has privacy won the draw, in the internet information age?

Last year, the Court of Justice of the European Union sent shockwaves across the world by holding that individuals had a right to request Google and other search engines to delist links to certain results generated by a search for their name. In February, an Advisory Council set up by Google to give recommendations on implementation of the judgment, concluded that de-listings should be limited to EU domains, and that publishers and webmasters should be notified when their content is delisted. More recently, however, Google announced that it would de-list search results from all domains accessed from the EU. These remain highly contentious issues with European institutions and among civil society groups .

Meanwhile, the EU recently adopted the General Data Protection Regulation which arguably goes beyond the Google Spain ruling and could have significant implications for freedom of expression in Europe and beyond. From South Korea to Russia, Mexico or Brazil, several countries have adopted or are looking to adopt legislation that would enshrine a ‘right to be forgotten’.

Yet the contours of this ‘right’ and what it entails remain elusive. Among other things, there are disagreements as to whether it involves ‘erasure’ or mere de-listing, whether its scope should include the protection of public information, and whether data subject should be required to establish substantial harm to their right to private life when making a ‘RTBF’ request. It is therefore more important than ever to set out the parameters of the ‘right to be forgotten’ and how to properly balance it with freedom of expression.

Based on Open Net Korea and ARTICLE 19’s policy work on this issue, the participants in this workshop will debate basic principles on how to achieve this balance. In particular, the participants will seek to address the following questions:

- Should we talk about a ‘right to erasure’, ‘right to be de-listed or de-indexed’ or the ‘right to be forgotten’?
- Should public information fall within the ambit of a ‘right to be forgotten’? How can we adequately protect freedom of expression in data protection legislation?
- Should data subjects be required to establish substantial harm in ‘RTBF’ requests?
- Should content producers be notified of a ‘RTBF’ request? Should they be given a right of appeal? How else could free expression interests be represented before data protection authorities?
- Are data protection authorities or equivalent best placed to make these assessments? How should they be composed in order to properly take into account free expression concerns?

Speakers
avatar for Barbora Bukovská

Barbora Bukovská

Senior Director for Law & Policy, ARTICLE 19
Barbora Bukovská has been ARTICLE 19’s Senior Director for Law and Policy since 2009. She leads on the development of all ARTICLE 19 policies and provides legal oversight and support to legal work across the organization.  Barbora has an extensive experience working with various organisations on a range of human rights issues, including protection from discrimination, access to justice, deprivation of liberty, reproductive... Read More →
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →
JC

Juan Carlos Lara

Content Director, Derechos Digitales Chile
avatar for Frane Maroevic

Frane Maroevic

Director, OSCE RFoM
Director of the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, OSCE
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
avatar for Pranesh Prakash

Pranesh Prakash

Policy Director, Centre for Internet and Society
Pranesh Prakash is a Policy Director at — and was part of the founding team of — the Centre for Internet and Society, a Bangalore-based non-profit that engages in research and policy advocacy. He is also the Legal Lead at Creative Commons India and an Affiliated Fellow at the Yale Law School's Information Society Project (formerly an A2K Fellow there), and has been on the Executive Committee of the NCUC at ICANN. In 2014 he was selected by... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Bridge

10:30am

Reporting, Whistleblowing, and the Challenge of Data Verification: Tech Demos and Lightning Talks
"The Whistle: A Human Rights Reporting Platform that Empowers Civilians and Speeds Verification"
ID: 36 — Dr Ella McPherson (Lecturer, University of Cambridge - Department of Sociology), Giles Barton-Owen (Researcher, University of Cambridge - POLIS), Isabel Thorton (University of Cambridge, Department of Sociology), Rebekah Larsen (Student, University of Cambridge - Department of Sociology), Matthew Mahmoudi (Student, Queen Mary University of London - School of Politics and International Relations)
Great optimism exists around the potential for digital reports of human rights violations, particularly in the possibilities for empowering civilian witnesses and simultaneously broadening access to the accountability mechanism of human rights. Yet research has shown that the time and expertise required to verify this information can be a bottleneck to its use by human rights organisations. The Whistle is a project based at the University of Cambridge that aims to translate this academic research into a tool that can support the use of digital information from civilian witnesses in human rights fact-finding. It intends to do this on a reporting platform in two ways: (1) educating civilian witnesses on the production of high-quality human rights evidence through prompting them to include certain types of information in their reports and providing them resources via a reporting interface (thus boosting their information literacy); and (2) reducing the expertise and time necessary for fact-finders to verify digital information through automating the cross-checks of reported data with third-party tools and databases. This presentation will introduce the research behind and within the project, the current conceptual and technical status of The Whistle, and give an example of how The Whistle might be put to varied uses depending on the case (e.g., in the realm of corporate social responsibility) by introducing our current partner, Wikirate. We are very interested in feedback from others in the verification space as well as from human rights fact-finders about how The Whistle might fit into their existing research practices.

"Implementing a Whistleblower Submission Portal in Mexico to Protect Individuals’ Data Privacy Rights"
ID: 301 — Cédric Laurant (Executive Director, SonTusDatos (Artículo 12, A.C.)
This session will cover the implementation of our open source anonymous submission portal for whistleblowers.  We aim to collect information from people who would know of an actual data breach an organization in the private sector has faced but not notified to its clients, customers, users or employees, despite being legally compelled to notify it under the Mexican data protection legal framework.  That information will help us investigate the data breach and determine whether to make it public, or refer it to the Mexican Data Protection Authority.  The principal objective of the portal is to protect data owners in Mexico who might be affected by identity theft or other type of online or offline fraud because of the failure of a company to notify it, or report it to the authorities.  Our goal is also to collect relevant information about most of the data breaches in the private sector that until now go unreported in Mexico.
We will focus on some of the following questions: how likely is it that the people who we want to inform us about potential or actual data breaches through the whistleblower submission portal will have the skills to detect them?; how should one adjust the balance between private corporate interests and the public’s right to know?
In this session, we specifically look for the input and feedback from experts with knowledge and expertise in anonymous whistleblowing submission portals.

"Publeaks Connects Whistleblowers with the Media" 
ID: 35 — Marcel Oomens (Project Officer Gender, Innovation & Safety, Free Press Unlimited)
Publeaks makes counter-surveillance technologies transparent and available to journalists and their sources. The platform allows whistleblowers and journalists to communicate privately, anonymously and safely. Publeaks supports investigative journalism, holding governments and businesses to account. Free Press Unlimited has successfully established secure, digital whistleblowing platforms in Mexico (Méxicoleaks) and the Netherlands (Publeaks NL). We're also involved in setting up similar platforms in several African countries. In this session we wish to share experiences with setting up whistleblowing platforms and reach out to people and organisations that have an interest in starting similar initiatives in other countries and regions, especially in regions where journalism and freedom of expression are under threat.

Checkdesk: Verify breaking news online
ID: 66 — Chris Blow (Director of User Experience, Meedan), Tom Trewinnard (Business Development Manager, Meedan)
Checkdesk is a flexible toolkit for collaboration around verifying user generated content, with a special focus on social media and the demands of real time, collaborative verification. The Checkdesk project has worked to build tools, support independent journalists, and develop media literacy training resources that aim to improve the investigative quality of citizen journalism and help limit the rapid spread of rumors and misinformation. In this demo session, we will look at the Checkdesk platform, our new work on building a verified sources database for journalists, and use cases around verification for journalism, human rights research and education. 

"VideoVault: Preserving online video as evidence for human rights practice and journalistic work"
ID: 454 — RightsLab


"Hancel, a security app for journalists"

ID: 299 — Gloria Patricia Meneses (Software developer and Internet Activist at Karisma Foundation and RedPaTodos Collective)
Hancel is a a set of communication tools intended to improve your security
and protect the privacy of your information without relying on others.
The app focuses on three dimensions: alert on life-threatening situation or
physical imminent attack, a set of secure & private communication tools
(secure call & chat), and digital self-protection survey.  Designed for
Android mobiles, having in mind journalists and activists, but useful for a
more general public.

During the tech demo, we will show the current development stage, future
features and how people and organizations can get involved.

Speakers
GB

Giles Barton-Owen

Research Associate, University of Cambridge
Researcher, University of Cambridge - POLIS
avatar for Chris Blow

Chris Blow

Designer, Meedan
Director of User Experience, Meeda
RL

Rebekah Larsen

Student, University of Cambridge - Department of Sociology
avatar for Cedric Laurant

Cedric Laurant

President & Executive Director, SonTusDatos (Artículo 12, A.C.)
SonTusDatos ("It's Your Data") is the first non-profit program that defends since 2012 the privacy and data protection rights of ICT and Internet users in Mexico. (It is part of Artículo 12, A.C., a non-profit organization based in Mexico.) | More info at http://sontusdatos.org/. | Bio: http://sontusdatos.org/staff/cedric-laurant/
MM

Matthew Mahmoudi

Student, Queen Mary University of London - School of Politics and International Relations
DE

Dr Ella McPherson

Lecturer, University of Cambridge - Department of Sociology
GP

Gloria Patricia Meneses

Software developer and Internet Activist at Karisma Foundation and RedPaTodos Collective
avatar for Marcel Oomens

Marcel Oomens

Project Officer Gender, Innovation and Safety, Free Press Unlimited
Project Officer Gender, Innovation & Safety, Free Press Unlimited
IT

Isabel Thorton

University of Cambridge, Department of Sociology
avatar for Tom Trewinnard

Tom Trewinnard

Programs & Partnerships, Meedan
Meedan



Wednesday March 30, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Demo Room

11:45am

Crypto Summit 2.0 (Sold Out!)
For more information about the CryptoSummit 2.0's schedule and program, please visit https://www.accessnow.org/crypto-summit-2-0/

Wednesday March 30, 2016 11:45am - 6:00pm
*The Hub*

12:00pm

Blogging Ideology: Consequences of religious expression in South Asia
In South Asia, society is dominated by religion, where blasphemy laws are made and implemented and one religion gets priority over others. This practice greatly undermines freedom of expression, where the slightest comment on any religious account can be termed blasphemous and the author/speaker of such a comment can be charged and held punishable. This response comes not only from the law but also comes in the form of vigilante action by members of the public angered by perceived blasphemy. In countries like Pakistan, for example, there have been many incidents in the recent past, where groups of people or even individuals have taken lives of others on mere accusations of committing blasphemy. Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights gives everyone the “right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion”. Through Article 19, we have also been given the freedom to expression ourselves freely, through any medium. However, across Asia, these two freedoms combined online have created a dangerous nexus that has cost many their lives, security and freedom. Religion, especially in societies and states that have and ‘official’ religion tends to be a matter of extreme sensitivity.
Opinions against or in deviation with the majority religions can be dangerous. While the internet has empowered people to express and broadcast their opinions to a previously unimaginable number of people, the same ability has also exposed people with diverse and deviating ideological and religious expressions to volatile and violent reactions. From hate speech bordering on harassment to threats, attacks and murders – bloggers and journalists focused on speech of a religious nature have increasingly faced persecution. This panel will explore a few key questions including; how does one regulate matters of faith and spirituality, especially those where different rights come in conflict? How much freedom of expression should there be, when it comes to speech and opinions about religions? and what have been the consequences of such speech for bloggers in countries like Bangladesh and Maldives? And what possible policy and practical solutions can be employed to make the online space safer for ideological speech?

Speakers
avatar for Asad Baig

Asad Baig

Executive Director, Media Matters for Democracy
A broadcast journalist by training and an information technologist by education. My work focuses on advocacy around freedom of expression and religious expression, media, and media safety. I have a keen interest in ICT and technology for journalism and development. | | MMfD in Pakistan works on advocacy around freedom of expression online and offline, developing ICT technologies for media and journalism, and campaigning around gender... Read More →
avatar for Sahar Habib Ghazi

Sahar Habib Ghazi

Managing Editor, Global Voices
I help run the unique and borderless Global Voices community and completely virtual newsroom, where we cover 167 countries in 35 languages, through our stellar group of 1400 volunteer writers and editors. I am also on the board of Media Matters for Democracy, a media policy and research group in Pakistan. Before joining Global Voices in 2012, I worked as a journalist in Pakistan where I covered war, elections, natural disasters, and human... Read More →
FH

Furhan Hussain

Bytes for All
YR

Yameen Rashid

Blogger, Maldives


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Nest

12:00pm

Facing violence, empowering women: fighting online misogyny in a human rights framework
Technology-related Violence Against Women are acts of gender-based violence either committed or aggravated by the use of ICTs.

While there is a growing recognition of the importance of integrating VAW discussions on Internet policy, a difficulty is that of dealing with the sometimes seemingly contradictory human rights of freedom of expression and those related to gender protection and gender-related emancipation. This issue expresses itself oftentimes in the subject of intermediary liability in terms of third party contents, but not only - specially regarding cases of blackmail, extorsion and breach of intimacy. One way to go in this discussion is to fight speech with speech - digital platforms being used as advocacy tools to fight misogyny and gender stereotypes.

At the same time, the way acts of online VAW evolve call for integrating into the discussion the way other rights, particularly social rights, are affected and/or can be mobilized.

This session draws on research, advocacy initiatives and experiences from different places of the globe, with the wider objective of finding common grounds for protecting these different sets of human rights, building bridges between Internet and gender policy discussions, and strengthening networks of research and raising awareness initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Betsy Bramon

Betsy Bramon

Senior Policy Advisor, Gender-based Violence, Tech, U.S. Department of State
A dedicated human rights advocate with 10 years of international experience working in civil society, government and community activism, Betsy has deep expertise in cross-cutting fields within human rights sectors in Asia, Europe and the U.S. Her expertise in human rights focuses on Internet freedom and human rights online, women’s empowerment, gender-based violence, forced labor, human trafficking and modern slavery. A few examples of her... Read More →
avatar for Nathaly Espitia Diaz

Nathaly Espitia Diaz

Communications coordinator, Karisma Foundation
Social communicator, journalist and free culture | activist. Currently she is the cordinator of the communications team at Karisma foundation and member of Creative Commons Colombia. She works in the development of comunications strategies for differente projects of culture and technology. She is part of alternative communications projects in Colombia.
FH

Furhan Hussain

Bytes for All
avatar for Julie Owono

Julie Owono

Head of Africa Desk, Internet Sans Frontières
I am the Head of Africa Desk at Internet Sans Frontières (Internet Without Borders) where I focus on Rights and Freedoms in the digital space, and develop the organization globally. I am also a lawyer at the Paris Bar, working on Telecommunications, Intellectual property. | Subjects that I'm interested in : Gender equality, Democracy in Africa, Innovation in Africa, Surveillance... and Music :-) | My work was published in various... Read More →
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Cottage

12:00pm

Secure the News: A Dialogue on How to Protect the Future of Journalism
TBA

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey King

Geoffrey King

Technology Program Coordinator, Committee to Protect Journalists
Geoffrey King joined CPJ in 2013 to coordinate the organization's Internet and technology policy efforts. Based in San Francisco, he protects the rights of journalists through advocacy, public education, and engagement with policymakers worldwide. | | Prior to joining CPJ, King, an attorney by training, represented U.S.-based individuals in constitutional matters involving the freedoms of speech, press, and petition. He is also a documentary... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Slate

12:00pm

Assessing Terms of Service compliance with Human Rights Standards
Consent for the processing of personal information has increasingly become the price users pay to use "free" services online. The migration of our lives to the online environment allows translating an increasing number of our daily activities into data and subsequently exploiting this information to produce new forms of value. The proposed panel will discuss the adequacy of the "notice and consent" model for data protection by bringing empirical evidence of how companies are concretely implementing it. Participants will focus on Internet intermediaries’ and their terms of service as well as on other examples of (governmental or non­governmental) initiatives trying to address the new challenges introduced by massive collection and processing of personal information to the protection of privacy. Moreover, participants will discuss the impacts of massive processing of personal data, analysing the different models that can be adopted in order to exploit data while minimising the potential negative consequences on individuals’ privacy.

The participants will engage in an interactive discussion, debating questions such as:
• How data can be used to drive social change?
• How can citizens and activists use data to challenge the status quo, e.g. force companies to negotiate their terms of service with consumer organizations, or force them (through technological means) to accept the terms defined by the data subject?
• What instruments do we need to foster better corporate compliance with human rights?

Speakers
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
JV

Jamila Venturini

Project leader, FGV


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fishbowl

12:00pm

Jurisdiction and Extraterritoriality in a Connected World
This session will explore jurisdiction in an increasingly post-Westphalian paradigm. Ideas of territorial jurisdiction are being tested (and brought into question) in an increasingly connected online world.

We will discuss the issue of global content deletion orders based on one country’s national law. These typically arise when courts order intermediaries to delete content posted by a user ­­often based on legal theories that conflict with other countries' free expression laws. With both the French Data Protection Authority and a Canadian court ordering Google to delete search results globally, the issue is very current. What are the right responses in terms of law and policy?

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Bertrand De La Chapelle

Bertrand De La Chapelle

Director, Internet & Jurisdiction Project
Director and Co-Founder of the Internet & Jurisdiction Project
avatar for Michael Geist

Michael Geist

University of Ottawa
University of Ottowa
GH

Gwen Hinze

UC Berkeley and EFF
avatar for Dan Svantesson

Dan Svantesson

Professor, Bond University
Professor Svantesson is Co-Director of the Centre for Commercial Law at the Faculty of Law, Bond University (Australia), Visiting Professor at the Faculty of Law, Masaryk University (Czech Republic) and a Researcher at the Swedish Law & Informatics Research Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden). He specializes in international aspects of the IT society, a field within which he has published a range of books and articles, and given... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Bridge

12:00pm

Funding the Fight for Digital Rights: An OTR Q&A with Donors
As the human rights technology and internet freedom ecosystem evolves, so too are those supporting funders. This session is an opportunity for current and potential grantees to briefly hear from a panel of funders on their view of the current landscape, current concerns and challenges, and then participate in an audience driven non-recorded “Ask-Me-Anything” for any and all related questions.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Michael Brennan

Michael Brennan

Program Officer, Ford Foundation
AC

Alberto Cerda

Ford Foundation
avatar for Marcin de Kaminski

Marcin de Kaminski

Policy Specialist FoE/ICT, Sida
Policy specialist – Freedom of Expression/ICT at Swedish @Sida. Internet researcher. Analyst of all things Internet.
avatar for Rian Wanstreet

Rian Wanstreet

Access Now


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Lab

12:00pm

Connectivity at risk? Keeping vulnerable groups connected
Internet access is growing in developing countries, but there are vulnerable groups, especially those who are experiencing Internet for the first time, that might be excluded or experience a restricted environment due to governmental or private sector-led initiatives. This panel aims at discussing the challenges to keep vulnerable groups connected. From recent initiatives in Brazil to ban low-cost smartphones to the development of inefficient broadband plans, there are a number of challenges that require further analysis in the global south.

Speakers
MV

Mario Viola

Institute for Technology and Society of Rio


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fireside

12:00pm

The Promise of Video: Documenters, Technology & Accountability
Thanks to the global proliferation of inexpensive mobile devices, video captured by citizens and on-the-ground human rights activists can be instrumental in drawing attention to human rights violations. But many of these frontline documenters want their videos to do more. They have the underlying expectation that footage exposing abuse can advance investigations of human rights and international crimes and bring about justice and accountability. And it can.

In many situations, these citizens and activists are better positioned to collect evidence of human rights abuse than professional investigators because investigators almost always arrive after-the-fact when evidence has deteriorated or is gone. However, the quality of citizen video and other content rarely passes the higher bar needed to function as evidence in a court of law.

This panel brings experts together to examine the importance of the game-changing role that frontline documenters are playing in transforming the fields of justice and accountability as well as the concrete steps they can implement to capture, organize, and manage the rich information they collect via video cameras in the field. In turn, this will ensure investigators and lawyers have better evidence to successfully hold those most responsible for crimes, systemic discrimination, and mass atrocities accountable.

At the end of the panel discussion there will be a product demo of the wEye platform by Linda Walter, who is looking for input on the verification mechanism of their new video platform: weye.info. You can watch their explainer video HERE.


Speakers
avatar for Yvette Alberdingk-Thijm

Yvette Alberdingk-Thijm

Executive Director, WITNESS
Video, participatory technologies and human rights, blurring faces, police violence & eyewitness video, video as evidence, curation of citizen media, Camera V & meta data; citizen journalism, media activists and freedom of expression, how Silicon Valley can make activists safer and their videos more impactful; Access! (board member) and digital users at risk
avatar for Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig

Executive Director, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley
Alexa is the executive director of the Human Rights Center (winner of the 2015 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions) and a lecturer-in-residence at UC Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches classes on human rights and international criminal law. She is a member of the Technology Advisory Board of the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court and is often called upon to speak about the role of emerging... Read More →
CK

Christoph Koettl

Senior Analyst, Amnesty International
Christoph Koettl is a Senior Analyst with Amnesty International, specializing in remote sensing, crisismapping and open source research and verification. He is the founder and editor of Amnesty International’s  Citizen Evidence Lab, the first dedicated resource on social media verification for human rights researchers. He previously worked and studied in Austria, the Netherlands and Italy and holds an MA in International Relations from... Read More →
avatar for Linda Walter

Linda Walter

Co-founder & board member, Future Challenges e.V.
Linda is board member and co-founder of the human rights NGO Future Challenges as well as research assistant and PhD candidate at European-University Viadrina. Her main (research) interests include verification of citizen videos, bottom-up movements, the moral basis for human rights, the (emotional) nature of humans, attitude change and communication via SNS. | She’s been volunteering for Amnesty International and gained inter alia... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Engine

12:00pm

Bridging the Gap Between Circumvention Tool Developers and Civil Society
Circumvention tools are being used to bypass censorship and even evade surveillance. This session will bring together tool developers and end users (civil society groups and individuals) in producing future solutions together. Collectively, we will discuss what has failed, what has worked in the past, and innovative solutions for user outreach - despite efforts to crack down on access to information by censors and authorities.

A number of tool developers will be featured to discuss their key challenges, process of engaging and supporting local communities/citizens, and how these have evolved in the past year. Some of the challenges that tool developers are encountering range from tool localization and local user support to responding to ‘just-in-time’ information controls to understanding how best to cater to a community’s specific needs. The session will also feature civil society groups who have engaged with tool developers and supported their work.

Speakers
avatar for Sina

Sina

ASL19
avatar for Amin Jobran

Amin Jobran

Outreach Manager - MENA, ASL19
Community coordinator at ASL19 for MENA region (especially Arabic speaking countries) I deal with tool localization, Outreach, and user support. I enjoy neutralizing any content blocking efforts by governments and telecoms.


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Demo Room

12:00pm

Whoever Tells the Best Story Wins - Media Techniques to Advance Advocacy and Litigation
N-Map will lead a workshop on how video and storytelling can overcome common challenges that human rights defenders face. The session will be very interactive - we will facilitate discussion to help people craft media strategies to further their own advocacy work.

N-Map helps human rights lawyers and advocates integrate video their advocacy. We use visual storytelling to bring human rights law and policy issues to life and provide opportunities for people affected by abuse to tell their stories directly to decision-makers.

We will present several case studies from our work around the world where media has been used at different stages of judicial or advocacy processes to impact human rights outcomes. We will then lead a discussion on what to consider when crafting a media strategy for legal/human rights advocacy, including production and distribution.

Small breakout groups will allow us to collaboratively brainstorm media advocacy interventions for participants at the workshop. Participants will have the opportunity to share their greatest advocacy challenges in these smaller groups and develop tactical media interventions to aid in their legal and policy advocacy work.

Speakers
avatar for Jesús Robles Maloof

Jesús Robles Maloof

Senior Lawyer, The New Media Advocacy Project
Jesús Robles Maloof is a human rights lawyer living and working in Mexico City, Mexico. He is a graduate of the Iberoamericana University and a Professor of Humanities at the Autonomous Metropolitan University. Jesus was the executive director of the Mexican Academy of Human Rights, as well as advisor to many different civil organizations focusing on culture and peace, gender equality, and international law. He has also collaborated with... Read More →
avatar for Adam Stofsky

Adam Stofsky

Executive Director and Founder, New Media Advocacy Project
Adam is the founder and executive director of the N-Map. Adam is a graduate of Amherst College (1998) and Harvard Law School (2004). After finishing law school, he served as a law clerk for the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and then received a Skadden Fellowship to work as a litigator at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. After his fellowship, he joined the law firm, Debevoise & Plimpton, as a... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Demo Room

1:15pm

Launch: Jensiat — A graphic novel on digital and sexual security in Iran
The subject of Internet security often sounds complicated and scary to regular users to the extent that they tend to ignore everything around the subject. As a prelude, the session starts with a short overview of the most effective methods of educating internet users on the subject of internet security.
We present our recent project “Jensiat” (“جنسیت”) which is about security: sexual and digital security! The joint creative project aims to educate Iranian audience on cyber security through visual storytelling. Jensiat is a fictionalized animated graphic novel of the life of a young female entrepreneur inside Iran. 
The story follows protagonist Leila, a 34-year-old woman who has returned to Iran after working and studying in France for more than a decade. Her return to Iran brings her face to face with issues regarding the various relations between men and women, and the struggles of making it big in Iran’s emerging tech start-up scene. With the help of her friends, including long-time love interest and Iranian-American digital rights activist Jamshid, Leila navigates her projects and ambitions through various trials and tribulations related to gender, security and state controls.

Wednesday March 30, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
The Lab

1:15pm

RightsCon Orientation Session
Overwhelmed by the schedule? Want to learn how to get the most of your time at RightsCon? Looking to doing RightsCon right? Interested in proposing a session for 2017 and want to know more about the process?

RightsCon Coordinator Nick Dagostino will be covering these questions and any more you have in this informal orientation session.  

Speakers
avatar for Rogelio

Rogelio

Security Incident Handler, Access Now
I am co-chair of The Demo Room at RightsCon 2016
avatar for Nick Dagostino

Nick Dagostino

RightsCon Coordinator, Access Now
Nick (Email: nickd@accessnow.org, PGP Key: 0x4DC5EF9C) coordinates the leading event on the future of the internet, and has a passion for bringing people together to tackle the great issues at the intersection of human rights and technology. Prior to joining Access Now, Nick was with the Munk School's Digital Public Square Project, and worked in digital diplomacy / citizen movement research. Nick also helped organize the 2014 Internet... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
The Cottage

1:15pm

Mapping Digital Security on Wikipedia
TBA

Wednesday March 30, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
The Demo Room

2:30pm

2:30pm

Hardly a Laughing Matter: Could Sexist Humor Amount to Dangerous Speech?

We wish to explore the link between sexist humor online and the concept of "dangerous speech", as expounded by Susan Benesch, particularly in different contexts around the world. The moderator will start off by having a conversation regarding the emergence of online sexist humor in Pakistan - from restaurant owners defending overtly sexist marketing strategies online and Pakistani Men's Rights Activists calling themselves "meninists" and berating women unapologetically, to a widespread display of homophobia (and misogyny) by Pakistani celebrities after the same-sex marriage verdict. We will then move on to the co-organizers discussing their experiences within their own countries and contexts. We will then discuss the idea of inflammatory speech driving people to harm one another and how sexist speech could potentially be a part of this. Later on, we will discuss solutions and limitations as to how such speech can be countered, while acknowledging that what works in one context may not work in another. This will include a discussion on whether or not to engage with 'trolls' by using counter-speech, how to react to such 'free speech' we otherwise wouldn't hear, the advantage of such speech being called out by other social media users, and more importantly, examples of such speech being effectively countered by feminists in an effort to reclaim public/online spaces.
We will then divide participants into groups and ask them to do the same exercise among themselves, and then each group will present their discussion, with examples, and the solutions that came from it.
Outcomes: It is important for us to understand how such speech can be countered and called out; we wish to discuss and devise creative solutions and also discuss limitations to countering sexist speech online. It is also important for us to discuss the importance of online movements and action in the context of feminism, particularly how to counter the backlash they receive. We wish to engage more activists and build an international network so that we can rely on more community-driven solutions for this widespread problem. 

Moderators
avatar for Asad Baig

Asad Baig

Executive Director, Media Matters for Democracy
A broadcast journalist by training and an information technologist by education. My work focuses on advocacy around freedom of expression and religious expression, media, and media safety. I have a keen interest in ICT and technology for journalism and development. | | MMfD in Pakistan works on advocacy around freedom of expression online and offline, developing ICT technologies for media and journalism, and campaigning around gender... Read More →
FH

Furhan Hussain

Bytes for All

Speakers
avatar for Chinmayi Arun

Chinmayi Arun

Executive Director, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
SB

Susan Benesch

Director of the Dangerous Speech Project & Faculty Associate, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Association for Progressive Communications
avatar for Japleen Pasricha

Japleen Pasricha

Founder- Director, FeminismInIndia.com
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Fishbowl

2:30pm

Beyond CSR: Promoting Strong Human Rights Performance in the Private Sector
International human rights rules are designed to bind States rather than private actors. On the Internet, this poses a challenge because many of the most important and influential actors are in the private sector. Multinational giants like Google and Facebook exercise a power over online speech that dwarfs that of most States. Yet, while these companies are keen to portray themselves as champions of freedom of expression, there is no solid understanding of what it means for a private company to behave responsibly in a human rights context.

This session will be the first public presentation of the findings of a major research project to define good practice for the private sector in a number of fields impacting online speech, including expanding access, net neutrality, moderating or removing user content, protecting privacy and anonymity, transparency and engagement with users. The project has developed a set of guidelines for how private sector actors can bring their policies into line with the human rights interests of the online community. The workshop aims first to present these guidelines, and then to facilitate a robust dialogue with attendees from the private sector, academia and civil society.

The project is led by the Centre for Law and Democracy (CLD), in collaboration with the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information, the Centre for Internet and Society, Open Net Korea, the Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information at the University of Palermo and researchers with the University of Ottawa and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

Speakers
EH

Elonnai Hickok

Director - Internet Governance, Centre for Internet and Society
avatar for Michael Karanicolas

Michael Karanicolas

Senior Legal Officer, Centre for Law and Democracy
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Cottage

2:30pm

Breaking Barriers: New Frontiers of Connectivity and Access

The panel will provide the opportunity to present different positions on the existing barriers to access information (i.e. affordability, lack of telecommunications infrastructure and awareness), and discuss the different strategies that are being implemented to solve these, and the pros and cons of such. Specifically, the panel will present and discuss zero-rating platforms, offline solutions, innovative broadcasting solutions, and other new forms of connectivity.

Outcomes
  • Establish the pros and cons of the different solutions that currently exist to address the barriers to access information. Through organized discussion, present the benefits of these different models, and address existing concerns.
  • Generate discussion about the feasibility of these solutions in the short term, mid term, and long term, in the context of emerging markets where barriers to access information are more harsh.
  • Create stronger connections between participating organizations, social entrepreneurs, and local stakeholders – enabling future joint advocacy efforts.

Speakers
JB

Jonathan Blandford

VP of Software Engineering at Endless
AF

Anders Finn

Director of Operations at MonkeyBrains
GF

Gary Fowlie

Head, ITU Liaison Office to the United Nations
Head, ITU Liaison Office to the United Nations
avatar for Malavika Jayaram

Malavika Jayaram

Executive Director, Digital Asia Hub
Malavika is the inaugural Executive Director of the Digital Asia Hub, Hong Kong. Incubated by the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and a diverse group of academic, civil society, and private sector partners, the Hub provides a non-partisan, open, and collaborative platform for research, knowledge sharing, and capacity building related to Internet and society issues with a focus on digital Asia. | | In a... Read More →
SK

Sam Klein

Fellow at Berkman Center / Former Director of Content at One Laptop Per Child
avatar for Andrew Puddephatt

Andrew Puddephatt

Director, global partners digital
Director of Global Partners and Association
AV

Adele Vrana

Interim VP of Partnerships - Wikimedia Foundation


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Fireside

2:30pm

Whoever Controls the Future of the Internet Controls the Future of the World
We are currently seeing a dramatic intensification of stakeholders who want to have a role in governing the internet. Developments related to ICANN's transition and to conversations at the World Economic Forum on the future of the internet, the WSIS+10 Review at the United Nations General Assembly, and other international forums have shown that everyone from governments to private businesses are interested in influencing (and controlling) the internet itself. 

But where does this growing interest stem from? Are these efforts made in good faith, and do they aim to protect users and defend their right to online information and freedom of expression, or are they launched with the intent of control - politically, militarily and geopolitically? And how do these policy decisions, which are increasingly made at the highest level, affect the internet user around the world?
This session is aimed at understanding why there has been such a marked interest in internet governance and who the key players in conversation are. It will also aim to identify who's "winning" - and what, exactly, is at stake.

Speakers
SC

Sally Costerton

Advisor of Stakeholder Engagement at ICANN
avatar for Uri Rosenthal

Uri Rosenthal

Dutch Special Envoy for Cyberspace, Government of Netherlands
He served as Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Cabinet Rutte I from 14 October 2010 until 5 November 2012. He previously served as a Member of the Senate from 8 June 1999 until 14 October 2010 and the Parliamentary leader in the Senate from 5 May 2005 until 14 October 2010. A professor of political science and public administration by occupation, he taught from 1980 until 2010 at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and the Leiden University.
FL

Frank La Rue

Assistant Director General for Communication and Information at UNESCO
RW

Ron Wyden

Oregon State Senator


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Lab

2:30pm

Iran Deal and the Future of Tech Sanctions
Given the recent Iran-US nuclear agreement, we would like to re-visit the issue of tech sanctions on Iran. Our goal is to clarify some of the main confusions about sanctions, what services are allowed, and what services are not. Equally as important is exploring what opportunities the #IranDeal will open for the tech and human rights community working on Iran.

Moderators
LL

Libby Liu

President of Radio Free Asia

Speakers
JA

Jamal Abdi

Executive Director, National Iranian American Council for Action (NIAC Action)
Jamal Abdi is Executive Director of the National Iranian American Council for Action (NIAC Action), a grassroots, civic action organization committed to advancing peace and championing the priorities of the Iranian-American community. Jamal oversees NIAC Action’s efforts to monitor policies and legislation, and to educate and advocate on behalf of the Iranian-American community. He formerly worked as a Policy Advisor in the U.S. Congress... Read More →
SK

Saeed Kamali Dehghan

Iranian-British journalist who writes for The Guardian
PH

Peter Harrell

Principle at Prospect Global Strategies, and former Deputy Assistant Secretary, Counter Threat Finance and Sanctions at State Department
EN

Emily Norris

State Department, Office of Iran Affairs
Emily Yasmin Norris is a Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Department of State currently working in the Office Of Iranian Affairs.  Specializing in Public Diplomacy, she joined the department in 2009 and served in two overseas posts as Public Affairs Officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Surabaya, Indonesia, and as a Vice Consul in the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt.   Originally from Massachusetts, Emily graduated from... Read More →
PP

Paul Pavwoski

State Department, Office of Iran Affairs
Since 2012, Paul Pavwoski has worked on Iran-related sanctions and economic issues, with a particular focus on sanctions connected to a variety of economic sectors, including the Information and Communications Technology sector (ICT). Paul is a member of the US foreign service, and he was previously assigned to the US Embassies in Pakistan and South Africa, where he worked on economic issues. Paul has degrees from the University of Michigan and... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Engine

2:30pm

Online Threats against Women: Case studies in Colombia and Costa Rica
Framed on current comparative study by Colnodo and Sulá Batsú (Civil Society Organizations based in Colombia and Costa Rica respectively) about ICT use, online security and possible risks of information management in activist networks that work with gender perspective in Colombia and Costa Rica, both organizations would like to present cases and discuss how violence against women (activists, journalists, human rights defenders, etc.) through ICTs is not only related with hate speech, but also the need to empower women: why activist women and human rights defenders are more vulnerable to violences against women, what is the importance of helping them to ensure collective processes by sensitize them, train them, strengthen them on strategical uses of digital communication, security issues, and privacy. The cases will show identified risks, safest ways to manage information, how to mitigate those threats and how all it can be strategical and converge into a digital communication protocol for the networks.

Currently, the debate usually focuses on harassment and hate speech, rather than focusing on autonomy, the agency and the safety of women. Developers and security developers are writing applications without consulting women who experienced violence online, or people who work with them. Specific concerns arise based on one solution in the world, which is a rejection of the diversity of women's experiences.

The aim is to enlarge the debate, including the recognition of different women needs considering their context, age, education level, ethnic origin, etc. Also, to promote innovation; motivate software developers and technology leaders to create software and ICT tools that recognize those differences and work to combat violence against women, strengthening women rights online using protocols, tools, resources, etc. And finally, to sensitize audience about the online violence against women not just like a classic example of hate speech but a specific case of gender based violence.

Speakers
avatar for Ariel Barbosa

Ariel Barbosa

Technology Projects Director, COLNODO
Strategic use of internet for Social Development


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Slate

2:30pm

What Do Privacy and Transparency Mean to You? Perspectives from the Global North and South
In our roundtable session, participants will hear perspectives from Asia and Latin America, as well as from the US and Canada, on privacy and transparency issues in their respective regions and discuss best practices and lessons learned. Our interest in submitting this proposal stems from projects that both the Citizen Lab and EFF have been working on. EFF issues the annual "Who Has Your Back?" report, which examines the transparency and privacy practices of various online service providers in regards to government requests to access user data. The report has been adapted by a number of digital rights groups working in various countries according to their to local laws and realities, including those in Latin America such as Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales in Mexico, the Karisma Foundation in Colombia, Hiperderecho in Peru, and InternetLab in Brazil, and has led to a better understanding of the privacy practices of the digital communication companies that millions of people use every day. The Citizen Lab has a related project in Canada, the “Access My Info” (AMI) web application, which helps Canadians file legal requests for access to their personal information to learn about what information that service providers hold, for how long, for what purposes, and when the information was disclosed to other parties (e.g., requests by government and law enforcement agencies). Since the tool's creation, tens of thousands of public requests have been made to Canadian telecom operators, and Canadians have filed dozens of complaints to the Privacy Commissioner of Canada regarding how telecom operators responded to these requests. The Citizen Lab recently formed a working group of researchers who will take the methods and tools of AMI, and apply them in Asia, which includes jurisdictions with personal data access laws and those with none, such as Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, and Hong Kong. The output of this research will be a series of reports and articles that provide a comparative analysis of the access request results.

Conversations around improving privacy rights worldwide often take a “one-size-fits-all” approach, which assumes that privacy has a single shared meaning in all communities. However, our experiences have shown that this is not the case. The implication is that privacy advocates in the Global South are often limited by definitions of privacy and transparency that do not necessarily speak to their local context in an effective manner. Engaging in a dialogue on how privacy and transparency are understood in different countries and regions, therefore, will allow us to improve on our methodologies and help us gain a broader perspective. In addition, having this discussion at RightsCon means that we would benefit from the insight that the participants—many of whom are experts in the privacy and digital security field—will provide.

Speakers
avatar for Luis Fernando Garcia

Luis Fernando Garcia

Director, R3D
avatar for Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

International Rights Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's International Rights Director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Her work in EFF's International Program also focuses on cybersecurity at the intersection of privacy, freedom of expression, and copyright enforcement.


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Bridge

2:30pm

It's a Cat and Mouse Game: Tech Demos for Security
"Decentralizing the Internet with FreedomBox"
ID: 151 — Mishi Choudhary, Esq. (Legal Director, Software Freedom Law Center), Sunil Mohan Adapa (Developer, FreedomBox Foundation) 
This session presents FreedomBox as a potential solution to many privacy problems on the Internet. FreedomBox is a personal server with a free software stack running the Universal OS that hosts on demand applications such as file sharing, shared calendaring, instant messaging, secure voice conference calling, blog and wiki. Unlike proprietary service platforms, FreedomBox software guarantees its users' rights, and works only for them, an indispensable attribute in the post-Snowden world. The session demonstrates important applications of FreedomBox with the goal to engage the listeners into using, building and contributing to FreedomBox. 

"NetAidKit - User-friendly VPN & Tor router"
ID: 45 —  Menso Heus (Technology Officer, FPU)
The NetAidKit is a pocket size, USB powered router that connects everything to everything, designed specifically for non-technical users. The easy to use web interface will allow you to connect the NetAidKit to a wireless or wired network and share that connection with your other devices, such as a phone, laptop or tablet. Once the NetAidKit is connected to a wireless or wired network, you can make it connect to a Virtual Private Network or the Tor network at the click of a button. Any devices connected to the NetAidKit will use these extra security features automatically, without needing to configure each of the devices separately. The NetAidKit was designed for regular people and requires no technical expertise whatsoever to use.

"Qubes OS: A Reasonably Secure Operating System"
ID: 291 — Michael Carbone (Manager of Security Education, Access Now)
This session will introduce Qubes OS, the security- and privacy-focused free and open source operating system. Its architecture enables the user to define different environments or “domains” on their computer based on their threat model and manage their interaction with each other and the network. It can integrate your favorite applications from Debian, Fedora, and even Windows into this architecture. This enables the user to protect information and communications on their computer from malware or compromise through layers of defenses, as well as provide robust identity management through the Tor anonymity network, VPNs, air-gapped domains, etc. 

"Subgraph OS: Adversary resistant computing"
ID: 110 — David Mirza Ahmad (Subgraph), Matthieu Lalonde (Subgraph) 
This talk will introduce a quick overview and tech demo of the alpha version of Subgraph OS, recently released for public testing. Subgraph OS is an operating system that offers what we call adversary resistant computing. Subgraph OS offers protection against the kinds of surveillance attacks being deployed against targeted individuals and organizations. There have been numerous documented incidents of exploit and malware attacks targeting journalists, political dissidents, activists, minority leaders and others. All of these attacks have a similar pattern of network-delivery of client side exploit and then implantation of remote access tool. These are exactly the kinds of attacks that Subgraph OS is designed to make more costly for adversaries. 

"Creating Private Cloud Sharers with uProxy"
ID: 50 — Daniel Borkan (Software Engineer, Jigsaw), Jonathan Pevarnek (Software Engineer, Jigsaw), Will Scott (Grad Student, University of Washington) 
uProxy is an open source peer-to-peer browser extension that lets users route their internet traffic through each other's computers, in order to circumvent content filtering and surveillance. We extend the uProxy model from real friends to "cloud friends" (privately operated virtual servers). This makes it possible for anyone to create a safe route to the internet that is available 24/7 and share it with their friends and family, while still maintaining the distributed nature of the uProxy network that makes it resistant to blocking.

 "Let's Encrypt the Entire Web"
ID: 312 — Brad Warren (Technology Consultant, Electronic Frontier Foundation)
Let's Encrypt is a free and open certificate authority being developed by EFF, Mozilla, Cisco, Akamai, IdenTrust, and a team from the University of Michigan. The project uses a new protocol called ACME for automatic domain validation and certificate issuance. This tech demo will show how easy it is to use Let's Encrypt to obtain a certificate and setup HTTPS on your website. By using Let's Encrypt, you can increase the security and privacy of your website in a matter of seconds. 

Speakers
avatar for Sunil Mohan Adapa

Sunil Mohan Adapa

Developer, FreedomBox
Developer, FreedomBox Foundation
DB

Daniel Borkan

Software Engineer, Jigsaw
avatar for Mishi Choudhary

Mishi Choudhary

Legal Director/Executive Director, Software Freedom Law Center/SFLC.in
Legal Director, Software Freedom Law Center
MH

Menso Heus

Technology Officer, Free Press Unlimited
JP

Jonathan Pevarnek

Software Engineer, Jigsaw
avatar for Will Scott

Will Scott

Graduate Student, University of Washington
BW

Brad Warren

Technology Consultant, Electronic Frontier Foundation


Wednesday March 30, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Demo Room

4:00pm

Addressing Extremism Online
This session will bring together representatives from civil society and government and the technology industry to discuss existing and proposed measures to combat extremist content online. 

Moderators
avatar for Michael Samway

Michael Samway

Georgetown University School of Foreign Service
Professor, Georgetown University and former Vice President and Deputy General Counsel at Yahoo! Inc.

Speakers
DA

Daniel Asrul

Global Movement of Moderates
HB

Hassan Baage

Chief of Section, UN Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate
avatar for Emma Llanso

Emma Llanso

Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy & Technology
Center for Democracy and Technology
AW

Alex Walden

Counsel, Free Expression & Human Rights, Google


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Bridge

4:00pm

Let's talk about Turkey
Speakers
DD

Deniz D. Aydin

Oxford University
avatar for Dunja Mijatovic

Dunja Mijatovic

OSCE Representative, Freedom of the Media
Dunja Mijatović was appointed in 2010 by the Ministerial Council of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) as the Representative on Freedom of the Media. The Council gave her a political mandate to protect and promote freedom of expression and freedom of the media in the 57 OSCE participating States. For more than two decades she worked on human rights, media law and regulation, institution building in transition... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Engine

4:00pm

4:00pm

Ranking Tech Companies: Software, devices and networking equipment
In November 2015 Ranking Digital Rights released its first Corporate Accountability Index. It focused on 16 of the world’s largest Internet and telecommunication companies. In future iterations, Ranking Digital Rights hopes to add other kinds of companies in the ranking, notably software producers and device and network equipment manufacturers. This will enable the inclusion of other key players in the ICT ecosystem.

Ranking such companies inevitably will come with other challenges such as comparability across a diverse kind of product range, complexities of dissecting their disclosure, and dealing with the generally more limited public disclosure by companies offering such products.

At the same time, it is clear that end-users of these products may be adversely impacted by products’ configurations and the companies’ operational decisions. Devices and software may have access to location data or biometrical information about their users, they may restrict certain types of web visits, encrypt device storage, etc. All such decisions impact users’ rights to freedom of expression and privacy.

That makes it especially important to devise an approach to benchmark software producers and device and network equipment manufacturers.
In this session we want to discuss with privacy and freedom of expression experts, technical specialists, and other participants how to best incorporate such companies in the already existing RDR methodology:
- what specific products should be included?
- what indicators of the 2015 Corporate Accountability Index can be used directly for these other types of companies?
- what indicators should be adapted?
- what indicators should be added?

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Slate

4:00pm

The IoT and the Future of Connectivity
TBA

Speakers
SS

Sara "Scout" Brody

Executive Director, Simply Secure


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Cottage

4:00pm

The political economy of the zero-rating debate in the developing world - what are the stakes?
This session aims to map the actors and their strategies that make up the pro-zero-rating lobby in the developing world, with a view to identify more clearly where civil society and other actors concerned about zero-rating need to focus their capacity building as well as advocacy efforts.

Zero-rating has become a heated issue in both the developed and the developing world over the past few years. The central questions, and the ways these are approached are, not the same in the North and Global South. This is because at the heart of the zero-rating debate in developing countries lies the question of how to expand Internet access, and its empowering potential, among populations that count vast numbers of poor people amongst them. Is zero-rating an appropriate or effective way to achieve this?

Many civil society organisations have argued that it isn’t. In their work, they are increasingly confronted with strategies from the pro-zero-rating lobby in the developing world that seek to undermine their arguments, in two specific ways in particular:

1. Through an emotional appeal that seeks to cast middle class civil society activists who already have Internet access as selfish people who are merely concerned that ‘their’ Internet will be altered, even if this is to make sure that a greater number of people can benefit from its offerings. A corollary is the argument that the voices from the unconnected are not represented by such activists, and are in fact not represented in the debate at all - ‘nobody asks them their opinion’, it is said.

2. Through the use of technical arguments to take the debate in a different direction and question the expertise of civil society activists. For example, net neutrality is often referred to as a ‘non-existent’ technical concept, because network management is never neutral. The principles of network neutrality defended by civil society members and relating to human rights, non-discrimination and equality are made out to be misguided or irrelevant in this context.

By mapping these, and possible additional arguments, as well as the actors that put them forward, in some detail, the session hopes to provide greater clarity as to what kind of support civil society organisations working in this field will need exactly, as well as how they can sharpen their advocacy effectively to counter such trends. How do we respond effectively to the challenges thrown at us?

The workshop will be conducted in a highly interactive manner, with trigger speakers identified in advance kicking off the discussion on a specific sub-topic, and exercises aimed at getting everyone to actively contribute their experiences and ideas.

Speakers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →
avatar for Raman Jit Singh Chima

Raman Jit Singh Chima

Global Policy Director, Access Now
avatar for Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa

co-Founder, SaveTheInternet.in
Founder and Editor - MediaNama.com; co-founder SavetheInternet.in/Internet Freedom Foundation
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
MP

Maria Pilar Sáenz

Karisma Foundation


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Fireside

4:00pm

Data protection in the Global South: towards an enforcement framework
This session intends to address the challenges of enforcing national privacy laws and redressing privacy harm in a globalized market, particularly in the Global South. Big markets such as Brazil, India and South Africa are struggling either to pass data protection legislation or to create strong Data Protection Authorities. In addition, often times privacy violations come from companies that are solely based in other jurisdictions, like the United States. Lacking effective enforcement mechanisms, some countries may adopt radical measures such as the recent Brazilian court decision blocking WhatsApp in the entire country.

In light of that, this session will promote a discussion about strategies to provide these countries with more effective enforcement alternatives. In order to do so, it will be important to reflect on the role of the FTC in policing *foreign* privacy violations.

Especially after the Safe Harbour Agreement's invalidation in Europe, this is an opportunity to broaden the scope of the discussion and make it more relevant for the Global South, where typically privacy protection is merely granted on paper but rarely effective in practice.

Speakers
avatar for Bhairav Acharya

Bhairav Acharya

Lawyer and Policy Analyst, Supreme Court of India
I am a privacy, technology, and free speech lawyer who has practised constitutional law in India's appellate courts for ten years, including in the Indian Supreme Court. I am closely involved in the movement for an Indian privacy law. I am associated with an ongoing litigation in the Supreme Court regarding wiretaps, privacy, and press freedoms. I have worked with the technology industry and civil society organizations to propose a draft law on... Read More →
avatar for Dennys Antonialli

Dennys Antonialli

Executive Director, InternetLab
PhD candidate in Constitutional Law at the University of São Paulo (Brazil), where he also earned his bachelor of laws degree (LL.B., 2008). He holds a “Master of the Science of Law” degree from Stanford Law School (J.S.M., 2011) and a “Master of Law and Business” from Bucerius Law School/WHU Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany (MLB, 2010). Dennys has worked in the technology and civil liberties team of the Policy Department of... Read More →
avatar for Luis Fernando Garcia

Luis Fernando Garcia

Director, R3D
avatar for Nithan Sannappa

Nithan Sannappa

Attorney, Privacy and Data Security, Federal Trade Commission
Nithan Sannappa is a senior attorney in the Federal Trade Commission’s Division of Privacy and Identity Protection where he enforces federal consumer protection laws concerning privacy and data security, including Section 5 of the FTC Act, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, and the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  As lead attorney on a number of the Commission’s high profile privacy and data security cases, such... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Nest

4:00pm

Surveillance, Race and Movement Building
Unchecked and unwarranted government surveillance programs have a long and storied history in our country. Recently, a wave of journalists, whistleblowers and worldwide events have revealed just how invasive these practices have become. They exposed state, local and federal law enforcement agencies infringing upon our civil liberties by spying on innocent people. These programs have collected our telephone metadata in bulk, deployed stingray devices with no oversight, intercepted phone calls and emails, monitored political protests and mosques and employed other invasive practices and programs. In response, people around the country have organized and pushed hard for surveillance reform legislation in Washington, D.C. - the USA Freedom Act, which offers modest protections, was signed into law in 2015. Organizing around these legislative vehicles has made it clear that communities of color are often left out of the discussion, despite being disproportionately targeted by surveillance programs. Join us for a conversation about the need to center race and racism in the movement for surveillance reform. We will move beyond USA Freedom, and grapple with the challenge of creating a strong and diverse surveillance coalition that can change the political climate in Washington and achieve real surveillance reform.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Buttar

Shahid Buttar

Director of Grassroots Advocacy, EFF
Shahid is a constitutional lawyer focused on the intersection of community organizing and policy reform. He led the Bill of Rights Defense Committee as Executive Director from 2009 to 2015, and graduated from Stanford Law School in 2003. Outside of work, he DJs and produces electronic music, kicks rhymes, writes poetry & prose, and speaks truth to power on Truthout.
BC

Brandi Collins

Media Justice Director, ColorofChange
avatar for Malkia Cyril

Malkia Cyril

Executive Director, Center for Media Justice
Malkia A. Cyril is founder and Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice (CMJ) and co-founder of the Media Action Grassroots Network, a national network of community-based organizations working to ensure racial and economic justice in a digital age. A prolific writer and public speaker, Cyril's articles and quotes-- on issues from Net Neutrality and surveillance to the communication rights of prisoners and new strategic communications... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Lab

4:00pm

Rapid Response to Support Victims of Phishing & Malware Attacks
This is a participatory & off the record (OTR) workshop where victims of phishing and malware attacks, representatives from major tech companies, and rapid response service providers will come together to review some of the main recent attacks and share learnings in order to be better prepared for the future to prevent and mitigate the impact of these attacks.

During the workshop, we will cover:
- Overview of recent major attacks
- Reflections of those who have experienced attacks
- Collective conversation with major tech companies and how they can improve their communications in regards to those attacked
- Sharing learnings and information to propose/create more effective strategies and responses
- Reviewing currently available rapid response resources

Wednesday March 30, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Demo Room

5:15pm

Responsible Market Exit: Challenges and Lessons

“The UN Guiding Principles require companies to conduct human rights due diligence, particularly when the company is faced with a major business event, such as market entry or exit. Several ICT companies have conducted robust market “entry” HRIAs, and a few leading companies are starting to conduct market “exit” assessments.

Responsible exit is an emerging area of business and human rights practice and literature that is not well-understood by companies, civil society, and practitioners. How much leverage does an “exiting” company have when leaving operations behind? What vehicles are available to increase leverage? What are risks to rights holders when a responsible company exits? Are there situations where companies should not exit markets at all? Should the results of the assessment be made public?

This panel will explore these issues in conversation with practitioners with deep experience in conducting human rights due diligence. TeliaSonera is one of the first telecoms companies to conduct market exit due diligence and to publish the findings from those assessments. This panel will explore the challenges in obtaining internal buy-in, conducting the assessment, and lessons learned in hindsight.”


Speakers
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Nest

5:15pm

Calling out the Haters: YOUR reflections on what works (or not) in policing online harassment
Around the world, women and LGBT advocates, activists, techies and journalists are reclaiming their agency and freedom of expression online by standing up to tech-based hate speech, threats and intimidation. In this session, we will explore and share creative, community-based, collaborative (and compassionate) tactics starting with experts from Pakistan, Turkey, and the United States. Then, we’ll hand the mic to YOU in a facilitated dialogue to capture challenges and potential solutions.

Come join us to share your experiences with alternative ways to prevent, mitigate and document online harassment, be it via campaigns, policy engagements, specialized tools, partnerships or other tactics. Together, we’ll consider best practices to share with governments, tech companies, and developers (who are welcome to join us!) to document these solutions and pave a way forward on these complex problems.

*Every effort will be made to ensure a safe space for survivors to share their stories via Chatham House Rules.

Speakers
avatar for Betsy Bramon

Betsy Bramon

Senior Policy Advisor, Gender-based Violence, Tech, U.S. Department of State
A dedicated human rights advocate with 10 years of international experience working in civil society, government and community activism, Betsy has deep expertise in cross-cutting fields within human rights sectors in Asia, Europe and the U.S. Her expertise in human rights focuses on Internet freedom and human rights online, women’s empowerment, gender-based violence, forced labor, human trafficking and modern slavery. A few examples of her... Read More →
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is a Pakistani lawyer and Internet activist who founded the not-for-profit organisation Digital Rights Foundation. In 2015, she was named in the TIME magazine's list of next generation leaders, for helping Pakistani women fight online harassment. | Dad led campaigns to protect online freedom of speech in Pakistan as well campaigns against legislation that gives the government broad powers of surveillance online, most notable one is the... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Slate

5:15pm

Combatting Terrorism Online
In the past 18 months, terrorist attacks in Paris, Copenhagen, Ankara, Beirut, San Bernardino, and other cities have led to increasing calls from governments to restrict online content deemed “extremist.” States have passed laws prohibiting incitement, glorification, or promotion of terrorism; they have sought to enter into public-private partnerships that lack transparency; and they have called for ICT companies to play a more active role in preventing the use of their technologies for terrorist purposes. But is the restriction of online content effective in preventing radicalization and stemming recruitment by groups such as ISIS? How should companies and users best respond to the expansion of Internet Referral Units and other informal arrangements in a way that respects the rights to freedom of expression and privacy? What role should governments, companies, and other stakeholders play in facilitating the dissemination of alternative narratives?

As part of its policy dialogue on the subject of extremist content online, the Global Network Initiative has convened discussions aimed at exploring key questions and fostering collaboration on the issue of extremist content online and the ICT sector in a multi-stakeholder setting. This panel will present some of the preliminary conclusions and recommendations that have emerged from these discussions.

Speakers
avatar for Bennett Freeman

Bennett Freeman

Co-Founder & Board Secretary, Affiliation Global Network Initiative
Over the last 17 years of a three decade-long career, Bennett Freeman has worked at the intersection of multinational companies, responsible investors, NGOs, governments and international institutions to promote corporate responsibility, sustainability and human rights around the world. An innovative leader in the fields of business and human rights, natural resource governance and responsible investment, he has played key roles in developing and... Read More →
avatar for Yves Nissim

Yves Nissim

Deputy Chief CSR Officer, Orange
Yves is deputy Chief CSR Officer of the Orange Group. His main field of expertise is Group CSR transformation, CSR reporting for the Group, stake holder dialogue and Human rights. He has carried Stake holder dialogue based on Orange CSR Strategy, in the main countries of the Orange footprint, including western and eastern Europe, Africa and middle east countries. | Yves has served in 2014 as Chair of the Telecom Industry Dialogue dedicated to... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Bridge

5:15pm

Lightning Talks: Access to Information and Censorship Issues
"You Gotta Fight for Your Right... to Edit"
ID: 63 —Stephen LaPorte (Legal Counsel, Wikimedia Foundation)
Wikimedia is a movement that is driven by its mission to globally empower people to create and share free educational content. This mission and the values of our community inform both our projects (like Wikipedia) and our policy goals of expanding free knowledge. The Wikimedia community has famously blacked out the English and Italian versions of Wikipedia to protest proposed legislation. Apart from these actions, Wikimedians also diligently work to defend free knowledge by answering policy consultations and pushing for copyright reforms in their respective countries. Moreover, Wikipedia itself a valuable case study in online collaboration. In this Lighting Talk we will invite our audience to help the Wikimedia movement tackle three pressing issues that everybody at RightsCon should care about.

"Administrative Censorship Online: Necessary Evil?"
ID: 117 — Jiwon Sohn (Researcher, Korea Internet Transparency Report Project)
Censorship on online contents inevitably raises concerns about invasion of the freedom of speech and the right to know. 'Administrative' censorship also has a high risk of political abuse. On the other hand, the public sometimes rely on or give support to the government regulating the online illegal or harmful contents. Is the administrative censorship of online contents acceptable? What are its problems, and what should be its standard and limits? We will discuss the above through examining Korean administrative censorship system which has a far-reaching and controversial authority.

"The invisible hand of the censorship troll"
ID: 225 — Luis Fernando Garcia (R3D)

"Is the hyperlink at risk?"
ID: 252 — Laura Tribe (OpenMedia)


Speakers
avatar for Luis Fernando Garcia

Luis Fernando Garcia

Director, R3D
avatar for Stephen LaPorte

Stephen LaPorte

Legal Counsel, Wikimedia Foundation
I'm an open source and data visualization enthusiast.
JS

Jiwon Sohn

Researcher, Korea Internet Transparency Reporting
avatar for Laura Tribe

Laura Tribe

Digital Rights Specialist, OpenMedia


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Fireside

5:15pm

Bring back the lawyers!
When advocacy effort have not been sufficient to ensure the protection of human rights, litigation is another useful resource available in the activist toolkit to solve violations. From the European Court of Human Rights to the US Supreme Court, the American Court of Human Rights to the Court of Justice of the European Union or the Indian Supreme Court, judges have become the first allies to human rights defenders.

This session will examine the role of litigation in the protection of human rights, reflect on past experience to improve defence of cases and develop innovative ideas for future ones.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Apar Gupta

Apar Gupta

Advocate, Law Chambers of Apar Gupta
I am a litigator practising before the high courts and the Supreme Court of India. My practice areas include technology, media and civil liberties. My representations are both for the private sector as well as for non-profits and civil society organisations. | | I have been part of the following cases : | 1. Section 66A / Intermediary Liability / Website Blocking (Supreme Court) | 2. Internet curfews and shutdowns (Supreme Court... Read More →
avatar for Nani Jansen

Nani Jansen

Legal Director, Media Legal Defence Initiative
Nani Jansen is the Legal Director of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI). She is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. Since 2011, she has overseen MLDI’s litigation globally, leading or advising on cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights... Read More →
avatar for Max Schrems

Max Schrems

europe-v-facebook.org
Max Schrems, Lawyer, Author and founder of europe-v-facebook.org. Max has studied law in Vienna and California. Since 2011 he has worked on the enforcement of EU data protection law in various ways, including procedures before different data protection authorities and a class action with more than 25.000 members which is currently pending at the Austrian Supreme Court. He has succeeded in his challenge against the “Safe Harbor” system at... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Lab

5:15pm

Uploading the Rule of Law: New Platforms for Global Justice
Respect for the Rule of Law, which anchors the effectiveness of legal regimes at the national and international levels, is a foundation for justice and human rights. It also holds important ramifications within the economic sphere, including in trade, investment, finance and development. The expansion of digital technologies has added a further layer of complexity – along with new opportunities and new risks. This roundtable of experts will highlight some of the platforms and resources related to the rule of law.

The American Bar Association, which has nearly 400,000 members, is committed to advancing the rule of law. The ABA Center for Human Rights has a broad mandate to address human rights challenges throughout the world. It manages a portfolio of projects in areas such as justice defenders, international criminal courts, atrocity prevention, human trafficking, business and human rights, and human rights education. We hope this RightsCon session will help raise the awareness of rule of law and justice platforms, and encourage their use throughout the digital sector. We want to identify new ways to promote human rights and legal empowerment in the global economy. Additionally, we hope to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, including the sharing best practices and the enhancement of technical capacities.  

Speakers
avatar for Judit Arenas

Judit Arenas

Director - External Relations, IDLO - International Development Law Organization
Judit Arenas is the Director of External Relations for the International Development Law Organization (IDLO) where she leads IDLO’s external positioning as the only intergovernmental organization focused exclusively on promoting the rule of law. Based in New York, she also serves as Deputy Permanent Observer to the United Nations in New York. Her responsibilities include oversight for advocacy, government relations, public affairs and strategic... Read More →
JA

Jeff Aresty

Founder and President, Internet Bar Organization
WB

Wendy Betts

Project Director, eyeWitness to Atrocity
Wendy Betts is the Project Director for eyeWitness to Atrocities. Ms. Betts has twenty years of | experience in international development, rule of law reform, and transitional justice. She has  | managed projects throughout Eastern Europe as well as in Sierra Leone, Indonesia, and Haiti.  | She previously served as a Senior Program Manager in the International Programs Division of  | the National Center for State Courts and as... Read More →
ID

Isabella D. Bunn

Chair of the Advisory Council, ABA Center for Human Rights
avatar for Matthew Harman

Matthew Harman

Director of Communications, World Justice Project
Matthew leads global communications for the World Justice Project (WJP), where he works to increase awareness for the the rule of law and its foundational importance to peace, equity, and opportunity. Combining original research, storytelling, and data visualization, WJP’s work has recently been featured in The Economist, The Guardian, Forbes, and in hundreds of other media outlets worldwide.


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Fishbowl

5:15pm

Net Neutrality Principles and Exceptions
Over the decade,the network neutrality debate has become a leading priority for both national and international policy makers. The US has explicitly banned discriminatory traffic management practices, such as blocking, throttling and paidprioritisation, but the FCC net neutrality framework - now having its third time in court - looks dangerously ephemeral. The EU has recently adopted a new Telecom Single Market regulation but key elements, such as specialised and zero rating practices, still have to be clarified. In Brazil the Marco Civi consecrates the net neutrality principle into law but the extent to which traffic management can be deemed as reasonable still has to be specified by administrative regulation. Korea equipped with nice sounding administrative regulation has not made up its minds about application to already rampant targetted P2P throttling or the oligopolistic telcos' zero rating of their subsidiaries' content services. Meanwhile other countries are still considering whether and how to properly regulate Internettraffic management.

This session will aim at analyse concrete examples of traffic discrimination around the world, providing concrete evidence of the need for net neutrality policies, while stressing the importance of fostering common net neutrality principles in order to favour the compatibility of national net neutrality frameworks. Moreover, the participants will analyse if and to which extent guaranteed-quality services (also called specialisedservices) and zero rating practices may be considered as compatible with the non-discriminatory traffic management.

Speakers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →
avatar for Miguel Morachimo

Miguel Morachimo

Director, Hiperderecho
Miguel Morachimo is a lawyer from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and the director of the nonprofit Hiperderecho, a Peruvian civil organization devoted to facilitating public understanding, research, promotion, and observance of human rights and freedoms in the digital world. His work has been featured in all major news outlets in Peru and he has participated in congressional hearings and several major international conferences. His... Read More →
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
avatar for Pranesh Prakash

Pranesh Prakash

Policy Director, Centre for Internet and Society
Pranesh Prakash is a Policy Director at — and was part of the founding team of — the Centre for Internet and Society, a Bangalore-based non-profit that engages in research and policy advocacy. He is also the Legal Lead at Creative Commons India and an Affiliated Fellow at the Yale Law School's Information Society Project (formerly an A2K Fellow there), and has been on the Executive Committee of the NCUC at ICANN. In 2014 he was selected by... Read More →
avatar for Chris Riley

Chris Riley

Head of Public Policy, Mozilla
I operate in the area of Internet policy, coming from a law and technology background. My motivation is the belief that an open Internet delivers tremendous socioeconomic benefits, and that if we as a global society don't "get" Internet policy more often than not, those benefits will go away. That path took me from computer science, to copyright, to telecom, to Internet freedom, presenting me with many opportunities to do some interesting and... Read More →


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Cottage

5:15pm

Security Now: How do Iranians Evade Sophisticated Targeted Attacks
Targeted phishing and malware attacks on Iranian activists and journalists have increased significantly. Using Citizen Lab’s 2015 report on such incidents (https://citizenlab.org/2015/08/iran_two_factor_phishing/ and ongoing current trends, we will contextualize and address best security practices.

We would like to raise awareness about what an individual can and should do in the event of an attack as well as what resources are available that include what leading tech companies (e.g. Google, Twitter and Facebook) have available as security mechanisms.

While the focus will be on Iran, there will also be a comparison with similar attacks on activists from other countries to provide a holistic approach.

Moderators
avatar for Ali Bangi

Ali Bangi

Co-Director, ASL19
My work focuses on bypassing internet censorship in Iran.

Speakers
avatar for Amir Rashidi

Amir Rashidi

Internet Security Researcher, International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran
Amir Rashidi is an internet security analyst, with an educational background in software engineering. He conducts research and analysis on internet access in Iran, online censorship policies and methods, and censorship circumvention tools. In 2011, he received the Hellman/Hammett Award from Human Rights Watch for his human rights work in Iran.
avatar for Jillian C. York

Jillian C. York

Director for International Freedom of Expression, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Talk to me about TOS enforcement and censorship on social platforms, or your work in the Middle East and North Africa.


Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Engine

5:15pm

Beyond Documentation: What Is the role of tech in advancing economic and social rights?
Because of their systemic and often hidden nature, the rights to health, education, food, housing and other economic and social rights fundamental to addressing poverty and inequality have been more difficult to enforce using traditional human rights tools. Increasingly, activists are experimenting with how to capture and transmit large amounts of information around the world at relatively low cost, including images, survey results or data visualizations. Leveraging the power of this technology has the potential to significantly alter the dynamics of advocacy on economic and social rights. A variety of factors, however, challenge the potential of these new tools, including: low tech literacy among human rights activists; the scarcity of tools specifically tailored to the needs of economic and social rights activists; and the need to develop a global audience that can partner with activists on-the-ground to analyze content and help bring evidence to a forum of redress. In Egypt, for example, a group of human rights researchers are in the early stages of developing an interactive online “scorecard” that rates the government’s performance (using a scale of red to green) on a range of indicators relating to economic and social rights. Despite the country’s longstanding patterns of socio-economic exclusion—which have left over 25 million people living in poverty—these rights have been relatively overshadowed by the dramatic socio-political upheavals of the past few years. Key questions in developing the scorecard include: How to combine data from various sources that would have otherwise remained fragmented? How to simplify that data into a format that is actionable and accessible to researchers, civil society, and policymakers? How to use that data to build an evidence base that can be used to foster public discourse, mobilize social movements and open up channels and opportunities for change? Taking this case study as our starting point, this node workshop provides a space for activists and technologists to come together to reflect on importance of addressing economic and social rights; explore the unique challenges in doing so; and brainstorm ways to design technological and methodological solutions that can best respond to those challenges.

Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Demo Room

5:15pm

I Will Follow You Into the Dark[net]
Because of their systemic and often hidden nature, the rights to health, education, food, housing and other economic and social rights fundamental to addressing poverty and inequality have been more difficult to enforce using traditional human rights tools. Increasingly, activists are experimenting with how to capture and transmit large amounts of information around the world at relatively low cost, including images, survey results or data visualizations. Leveraging the power of this technology has the potential to significantly alter the dynamics of advocacy on economic and social rights. A variety of factors, however, challenge the potential of these new tools, including: low tech literacy among human rights activists; the scarcity of tools specifically tailored to the needs of economic and social rights activists; and the need to develop a global audience that can partner with activists on-the-ground to analyze content and help bring evidence to a forum of redress. In Egypt, for example, a group of human rights researchers are in the early stages of developing an interactive online “scorecard” that rates the government’s performance (using a scale of red to green) on a range of indicators relating to economic and social rights. Despite the country’s longstanding patterns of socio-economic exclusion—which have left over 25 million people living in poverty—these rights have been relatively overshadowed by the dramatic socio-political upheavals of the past few years. Key questions in developing the scorecard include: How to combine data from various sources that would have otherwise remained fragmented? How to simplify that data into a format that is actionable and accessible to researchers, civil society, and policymakers? How to use that data to build an evidence base that can be used to foster public discourse, mobilize social movements and open up channels and opportunities for change? Taking this case study as our starting point, this node workshop provides a space for activists and technologists to come together to reflect on importance of addressing economic and social rights; explore the unique challenges in doing so; and brainstorm ways to design technological and methodological solutions that can best respond to those challenges.

Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Demo Room

5:15pm

Software Hygiene: A New Paradigm to Achieve Malware-free Operations
Malware detection is on its way out. Evidence shows that detection-based security solutions --such as antivirus-- are obsolete. Meanwhile, the effects of malware-borne activities are on the rise. Malware works... and it does very well for criminals and governments wanting to perpetrate human rights violations. This situation demands new ways of thinking if the outlooks of digital security, privacy, and personal data protection are ever to improve. We hope to illustrate and inspire people related to human rights organizations in the use of software hygiene, a radically different approach moving away from malware detection. Software hygiene aims to ensure malware-free operations wherever personal devices are in use. Join us to learn why it works, its potential, and how it helps individuals and organizations that need to avoid the high-cost and complexity of big data SIEM (Security Information and Event Management) solutions.

Wednesday March 30, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Demo Room
 
Thursday, March 31
 

9:00am

Online Hate Speech: Identification and Strategies
This session will bring together people who are concerned about different facets of hate speech (which we see as including gendered hate speech). The object is to get a diversity of stakeholders to speak candidly with each other about online hate speech. The discussion will focus on contentious issues like, anonymity, privacy, and jurisdictional concerns that come up in the context of legal intervention.

Speakers
avatar for Chinmayi Arun

Chinmayi Arun

Executive Director, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
SB

Susan Benesch

Director of the Dangerous Speech Project & Faculty Associate, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
avatar for Raman Jit Singh Chima

Raman Jit Singh Chima

Global Policy Director, Access Now
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is a Pakistani lawyer and Internet activist who founded the not-for-profit organisation Digital Rights Foundation. In 2015, she was named in the TIME magazine's list of next generation leaders, for helping Pakistani women fight online harassment. | Dad led campaigns to protect online freedom of speech in Pakistan as well campaigns against legislation that gives the government broad powers of surveillance online, most notable one is the... Read More →
CG

Cherian George

Associate Professor, Hong Kong Baptist University
Author of Hate Spin: The Manufacture of Religious Offense and its Threat to Democracy
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Puddephatt

Andrew Puddephatt

Director, global partners digital
Director of Global Partners and Association
avatar for Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

International Rights Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's International Rights Director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Her work in EFF's International Program also focuses on cybersecurity at the intersection of privacy, freedom of expression, and copyright enforcement.
avatar for Mark Stephens, CBE

Mark Stephens, CBE

Independent Board Chair, Global Network Initiative
Mark Stephens, CBE is the Independent Board Chair of the Global Network Initiative. A British lawyer specializing in international commercial dispute resolution, media law, human rights and intellectual property, Mark has undertaken some of the highest profile cases in the UK and around the world defending the free expression rights of artists, journalists, and the rights of online publishers in libel cases. He currently heads the international... Read More →
avatar for Jillian C. York

Jillian C. York

Director for International Freedom of Expression, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Talk to me about TOS enforcement and censorship on social platforms, or your work in the Middle East and North Africa.


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Nest

9:00am

Governments Stifling Innovation: The Impact of Internet Freedom on Tech Entrepreneurship

Freedom House’s panel session will discuss how government restrictions on internet freedom impact innovation and entrepreneurship in a country’s tech sector. The panel—selected to represent viewpoints from tech entrepreneurs and activists in different countries—will begin with a discussion about how various restrictions on internet freedom in their countries stifle innovation and impede their ability to make full use of the internet to improve their societies. The discussion will also seek answers to how the tech sector can help advocate for positive policies that support tech entrepreneurship and innovation as well as respond to the unique needs of users in restrictive internet freedom environments.

The session will also include an interactive exercise during which panel participants become policy advisors to a hypothetical tech firm that is undergoing a global expansion. Panelists are presented with a series of real-life scenarios of government pressure on tech companies, taken from Freedom House’s research. Contributions by the audience will also be encouraged.

Note from the organizers: We are pleased to announce that Dr. Ossama Hassanein, Chairman, Rising Tide Fund, enterprenuer, and venture capitalist will also join the panel.



Speakers
avatar for Walid Al-Saqaf

Walid Al-Saqaf

Postdoctoral Researcher, Stockholm University
ISOC Board Member, software developer from Yemen, internet freedom advocate. Currently involved in postdoctoral research and teaching in areas related to technology, media, journalism, data science, and quantitative research methods. Also involved in ICANN and APC.
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is a Pakistani lawyer and Internet activist who founded the not-for-profit organisation Digital Rights Foundation. In 2015, she was named in the TIME magazine's list of next generation leaders, for helping Pakistani women fight online harassment. | Dad led campaigns to protect online freedom of speech in Pakistan as well campaigns against legislation that gives the government broad powers of surveillance online, most notable one is the... Read More →
avatar for Sanja Kelly

Sanja Kelly

Director, Freedom on the Net, Freedom House
Freedom House
RO

Raindolf Owusu

Founder, Oasis WebSoft and Bisa M-Health
XQ

Xiao Qiang

Founder and Editor-in-Chief, China Digital Times
Founder and Editor-in-Chief, China Digital Times


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Lab

9:00am

Remedying Wrongs – Ensuring, Enabling and Empowering Access to Remedy in the ICT Sector
Businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights. This means that business should avoid infringing on human rights, prevent and mitigate adverse human rights impacts, and remediate adverse human rights impacts that do occur. This latter issue – remedying wrongs where they occur – has been largely neglected in the business and human rights discourse. This workshop will address this gap by highlighting the range of potential remedial mechanisms at play in the ICT sector, with a focus on state-based non-judicial mechanisms and company-level operational grievance mechanisms. This interactive workshop will be facilitated by the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR). Lead discussants who are experts in the business and human rights concepts of access to remedy will share their insights, experiences and reflect on practical examples.

The discussion will use emblematic case studies from the ICT and other sectors to highlight challenges, opportunities and positive practice in the provision of remedy. Participants in this workshop will leave the discussion with a stronger understanding of how the right to remedy plays out in the ICT sector, and learn good practice examples as they seek to ensure, enable and empower access to remedy in this sector.


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Slate

9:00am

How Free is Free? Open Access and Digital Rights in the Social Sector
How free is free when it comes to the research that foundations and nonprofits fund and produce? Do we have a unique responsibility to embrace open access and to sharing our knowledge as a public good? What is your organization doing about it?

These and other questions will be debated in this panel session, bringing together advocates and insiders from both foundations and nonprofits. After a short summary of key issues related to open access in the social sector, panelists will be asked to discuss the extent to which foundations and nonprofits need to embrace open access and how best to enact that change.

Our goal with this session is to challenge two prevailing ideas: first, that social sector knowledge is already openly accessible because much of it is “free” and second, that questions of open access are only relevant to those organizations who consider digital inclusion and information justice core to their mission.

Speakers
GF

Gabriela Fitz

Dir of KM Initiatives, Foundation Center
talk to me about knowledge mobilization, knowledge as a public good, how people learn, why research matters, open repositories, open philanthropy, long distance walking plans, animal therapy, and organizational change.


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Fireside

9:00am

Information and Accessibility Justice for Deaf People in Digital Age : Good Practices and Recommendations
Background 
Recent information communication technology (ICT) including broadcasting development 
brings both opportunities and challenges for human rights respect, protection, and fulfillment. 
This dynamic presents unique experience for people with disability particularly deaf and blind 
people. They face the diverse of enjoyment level of rights. Talk about human rights, deaf and 
blind people, accessibility, and ICT, the right to information (RTI) is a central point. In several 
countries RTI respect-protection-fulfillment for deaf and blind people already reached the 
adequate level while in other countries we witness a poor level. In this entire context, the 
government plays the main role as the policy maker and also the duty bearer. Though people 
could influence the substance, the governance, and the culture of public policy, it is the 
government will be the decision maker. 

The RightsCon 2016 is a great opportunity to reflect the path of RTI advocacy for deaf and 
blind people regarding ICT world in digital age. It provides a space for knowledge and good 
practices exchange for people with disability rights advocates around the world. It also provides the chance to gather the recommendations for the stakeholders around the world. Based on this consideration we bring ID#302 to the RightsCon 2016. 

About the session 

Session ID#302 will fall under the theme ‘Internet Governance and Digital Inclusion’ with 
subtopic ‘accessibility’. With the workshop format, session ID#302 will help the participants to 
understand the recent good practices of governments around the world in respect, protect, and fulfill deaf people’s right to information. The speakers from both Indonesia and United States of America will share their experience-assessment on their country status regarding information justice for deaf people. They will also present the challenges in policy advocacy and the stakeholder’s step in addressing those challenges. Based on speakers’ presentation, in the plenary session the participants will reflect their respective country experiences and the necessary next steps. These necessary next steps will address the law, the governance and law enforcement, and  the culture in the society. The increasing knowledge of the participants and the recap of stakeholders and countries’ good practices, combined with suggested steps by the participants will become the immediate output of the session. By their participation in the session, we expect civil society network (particularly people with disability organization / PDO network and human rights-people with disability organization network) could develop the stronger network and utilize it for sharing the resources. After the session and the whole RightsCon 2016 we expect civil society network (particularly People with Disability Organization network) could endorse the recommendations to the stakeholders in their respective country and beyond. 

Speakers
HG

Haben Girma

Staff Attorney at Disability Rights Advocates
avatar for Valentina Sri Wijiyati

Valentina Sri Wijiyati

Knowledge Management, Networking, and Media Dept. Staff, Satunama Foundation
I am Staff at Satunama Foundation, volunteer at Deaf Art Community, Ethical Board at Yogyakarta Chapter of Alliance of Independent Journalist. I share my concern on (1) Total Tobacco Advertisement Promotion and Sponsorship (TAPS) Ban, (2) information and access justice for people with disability toward the entire media, information, and communication world, and (3) human rights approach in media, information, and communication world.


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Fishbowl

9:00am

Real Access for Women Online - Connecting the next Billions
Billions of people are not connected to the internet and half of them are women. These are women who are poor, from the rural areas, the indigenous women, those with disabilities. How do we connect them so that they can benefit from opportunities that connectivity offers people and to help in their empowerment? We will share a 10 Country Research findings for the research conducted in Africa with support from the Web Foundation with particular reference to Philippines and Uganda on "Closing the Gender Gap in ICT Data and Policy making: ICTs for Empowerment of Women and Girls". The session will encourage discussions on how we can further women's access to the
internet. This can spin off into further research trends in other countries, as well as possible programs / program collaboration in grassroots communities for women's inclusion

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Association for Progressive Communications
AF

Amel Fahmy

Co-Founder, Harassmap
AT

Amalia Toledo

Project Coordinator and researcher, Karisma Foundation


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Engine

9:00am

Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Activism: Lightning Talks
"And Then They Came For Us: Defending Technologists from Human Rights Abuses"
ID: 262 — Danny O'Brien (International Directors, Electronic Frontier Foundation)
Activists, journalists, and lawyers are frequently front and center in the stories of repression, harassment and unlawful detention around the world. Their work makes them a powerful force for change and for defending human rights. It also makes them a target. Increasingly, technologists are playing the same pivotal role. But do we know how to defend them as effectively? And does it get easier or harder to tell those stories when those targets are not a "they" — but one of us?

"IranCubator: Sparking Iran’s Civic­Tech Sector"
ID: 218 — Firuzeh Mahmoudi (Director, United for Iran)
Several dramatic examples of routine daily human rights violations occur in the Iranian context: ”morality police” attacking civilians in the street, random raids of citizens who posted a controversial tweet, and mass arrest of Viber users who made jokes about Ayatollah Khomeini. All of these are addressable through the suite of online tools being developed at the IranCubator. I will start my talk with a relevant and specific story of one such event to bring the urgency of the Iranian experience into the room. I will then speak to the specific technological solution that we are developing to address the challenge. I will then move the presentation back to the related tools, and the model that is being developed by IranCubator ––the developer network, the security challenge, and other specific problems that we are developing governance and project management solutions to. Finally, I will end with call to action for participants with specific domain expertise to join us in conversation through the conference and beyond.

"Online Rights, Online Duties?'
ID: 286 — Fernando Berdion-Del Valle (Fellow, Harvard University)
Internet rights are on the rise. From well-established concepts, such as the right to privacy, to newly emerging ideas, such as the “right to be forgotten,” the politics of connectivity, as played out in parliaments, think tanks, and corporate campuses, are drenched in the language of rights. The ubiquity of “rights talk” raises a crucial question: do online rights imply online responsibilities? This Lighting Talk takes the idea of online responsibilities and duties seriously. It asks what these duties should look like, whether they should be codified, and what actors – private, public, or non-profit – should assume them. Ultimately, the talk proposes a new approach that may help governments, NGOs, and individuals advocate for a free, inclusive, and just Internet.

"What We Talk About When We Talk About Digital Intersectionality?"
ID: 111 — Danae Tapia (Director of Projects, Derechos Digitales)
In the social sciences and in the studies of discriminations we owe a lot to the concept of intersectionality, mostly famous because of the black feminists who saw their interests co-opted by white logics. It was necessary to identify not a single but every of the oppressive instances that vulnerable groups have to face, as class, gender and any ethnic factor. When we talk about digital rights in Latin America we can’t make the mistake of framing our policy efforts with first world logics.This talk expects to cover the sophistications of an effective approach for working human rights in digital environments in the developing world and propose possible answers exposing a couple of successful case studies where grassroots work and real networking have been key to the analysis of the technological problems in the region.

"Beyond Petitions: The Next Generation of Online Civic Participation"
ID: 328 – Ben Rowswell (Amb. Ben Rowswell, Co-founder, Perennial Software)
Petition sites like Change.org and Avaaz have shown that millions of citizens can change outcomes in global affairs through petitions.  But few global challenges can be reduced to a time-limited campaign that either succeeds or fails.  
To move online collaboration from the margins to the centre of world politics we need campaigns in which citizens participate more deeply and continuously.  If the Facebooks of this world have found out how to motivate billions to engage online, not-for-profits can as well.  Combine social algorithms on user behaviour, machine learning, and robust security into one collaborative platform and you could turn distributed action into a tool to address the thorniest of the world's problems. Amb. Rowswell will outline plans to create such a platform to save lives in Syria.

"Ushahidi: Online Crowdsourcing of Human Rights Reporting"

Speakers
avatar for Firuzeh Mahmoudi

Firuzeh Mahmoudi

United for Iran, United for Iran
Firuzeh Mahmoudi is the Director of United for Iran, a Bay Area NGO working to improve civil liberties in Iran. After witnessing the 2009 uprising in Iran, Mahmoudi organized a global rally in 110 cities. The day turned to be the largest day of global support for Iran in history. Shortly after, Mahmoudi started United for Iran. Seven years later, United for Iran works to improve human rights, support civil society, and increases civic... Read More →
avatar for Ben Rowswell

Ben Rowswell

Cofounder, Perennial Software Inc.
Co-founder, Perennial Software
DT

Danae Tapia

Director of Projects, Derechos Digitales
FB

Fernando Berdion-Del Valle

Fellow, Harvard University


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
*The Hub*

9:00am

Preserving Free Speech: A Practical Privacy Approach
How do you protect privacy while also safeguarding free speech? Our panel of privacy, security, and policy experts will discuss what individuals and organizations can do to protect online speech and user anonymity. The panelists will share some practical ways that attendees can make a difference in this space, including: improving transparency; implementing speech-­enabling features in privacy policies; safeguarding against government surveillance; developing privacy tools and controls; fostering legislative advocacy campaigns; and providing legal support for users whose anonymity is threatened.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Bronfman

Jill Bronfman

Jillisa (Jill) Bronfman, Director of the Privacy and Technology Project and Adjunct Professor of Law in Data Privacy, University of California Hastings College of the Law
Jill Bronfman, Director of the Privacy and Technology Project and Adjunct Professor of Law in Data Privacy at UC Hastings, was named one of the 50 Women Leaders in Tech Law in 2014. She was selected as a 2014-2016 USC Annenberg Alumni Ambassador and has blogged for Annenberg. Professor Bronfman was an Assistant General Counsel and Network Security and Privacy Subject Matter Expert for Verizon. At Verizon, she designed and... Read More →
avatar for Jess Hemerly

Jess Hemerly

Manager, Public Policy, Google
Jess covers transparency and accessibility, and leads work on Google’s Transparency Report and Take Action campaigns. Prior to joining Google, Jess worked as a researcher and editor at Palo Alto’s Institute for the Future, on the publishing side of several major publications including National Journal, and as a freelance music and culture critic. In 2009, Jess was nominated for a Webby award in the “Website: Weird” category for a blog she... Read More →
avatar for Amy Keating

Amy Keating

Senior Director, Legal, Twitter, Inc.
Amy Keating serves as Senior Director, Legal for Twitter, Inc. in San Francisco. Her organization oversees Twitter's domestic and international litigation issues, law enforcement related legal matters, and ediscovery. Amy joined Twitter in 2012 as its first Litigation Counsel. Her work since then has included managing Twitter's docket of active litigation matters (covering everything from CDA 230 issues and civil subpoena disputes to patent... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Paulson

Michelle Paulson

Legal Director, Wikimedia Foundation
Michelle Paulson serves as Legal Director at the Wikimedia Foundation, the nonprofit organization that hosts Wikipedia and other online collaborative projects in furtherance of its mission to disseminate free knowledge to a global community of users. Michelle has been with the Foundation since 2008, working on a variety of issues including community and content issues, contracts, intellectual property, international law, licensing, and policy... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Cottage

9:00am

State Sponsored Cyber Attacks in Theory and Practice
This interactive panel, moderated by Yasmin Green, Head of Research and Development for Jigsaw (formerly Google Ideas), will focus on state-sponsored cyber attacks from hotspots around the world. Experts on the front lines witnessing these attacks in real time will explore both the tactics and increasingly political motives behind them.

Moderators
YG

Yasmin Green

Head of Research and Development, Jigsaw

Speakers
avatar for Dlshad Othman

Dlshad Othman

Dlshad Othman is award winning Kurdish - Syrian software engineer, specialist in information security And U.S State Department Internet Freedom fellow, Dlshad focuses on providing digital security resources and assistance to journalists and civil society organizations  that they can utilize online communications and advocacy freely and securely in spite of increased online governments repression in the form of censorship, sophisticated... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Bridge

9:00am

Free the Speech: New Tech for Secure Communications
"Feedback Session on New Prototypes in Human Rights Technology"
ID: 200 — John Higgins (Product Manager, Benetech Labs)
This session will present the preliminary results of a several-month-long research engagement with international Human Rights defender community.The project goals included performing substantive user research to identify technical solutions that address key gaps in the collection and management of human rights data. As a result of this work, Benetech has begun to design and implement several prototype systems around addressing issues surfaced during our research. This session will outline the research methodology, review a synthesized summary of findings, and ask for feedback regarding the proposed solutions.

"The Local Web: Exploring the challenges of nearby communication tech"
ID: 180 — Josh King (Lead Technologist, New America's Open Technology Institute)
The Local Web will explore options for local communication when using the wider internet is not desirable or not available. This session will explore tools for self-hosting, community and mesh networks, device-to- device communication, delay tolerant networking, service discovery, and more. We will also outline many of the surprising challenges encountered when trying to communicate digitally with someone next to you, across the room, or across your neighborhood. Attendees of this demo will come away with a greater understanding of the possibilities for using the web and other internet technologies on a local, rather than global, scale.

"Privacy is Possible. Signal Makes it Easy."
ID: 310 — Lilia Kai (Developer, Open Whisper Systems)
Check out the latest and greatest from Open Whisper Systems! We believe that privacy is possible, encryption is for everyone, and that secure messaging apps should be a joy to use. Signal Private Messenger, for Android and iOS, is widely regarded as best-in-class by both security and usability experts alike. In this session, we'll demonstrate the newest addition to our cross-platform family of encrypted chat applications: Signal Desktop.

"Stop Online Tracking — How Privacy Badger Protects Your Web Browsing"
ID: 309 — Noah Swartz (Staff Technologist, EFF)
Learn who, how, and why you're being tracked as you browse your favorite websites! Noah Swartz from EFF will go over the ways that the modern web is designed to track you - and what you can do to protect yourself. He'll cover 'fingerprinting', 'cookies', and 'supercookies' - as well as what the newest technology in tracking protection is doing about them, including EFF's own project Privacy Badger.

"Censorship? No!"
ID: 14 — vmon (R&D lead, eQualit.ie) 
This talk will describe the fundamental problem in the field of anti-censorship technology that CeNO! is trying to solve. We explain how CeNo architecture is tackling this problem. We demonstrate CeNO! in action and explain our future plan for developing it into a more robust and more agile solution. 

Speakers
V

vmon

R&D lead, eQualit.ie
JH

John Higgins

Product Manager, Benetech Labs
LK

Lilia Kai

Developer, Open Whisper Systems
NS

Noah Swartz

Staff Technologist, EFF


Thursday March 31, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Demo Room

10:30am

Network disconnections: Effects on Civil and Trade Rights
The practice of shutting down communications or suspending certain services continues globally. This has happened over the past decade or so for a variety of reasons, sometimes due to national security concerns but also to prevent the organisation of protests or the spread of civil unrest. The government blocked access to social networking sites Facebook and Twitter, and messaging applications Viber and Whatsapp.

Due to the extremely sensitive nature of the subject, most telecommunications operators rarely address publicly the issue of network shutdowns and associated policies. Therefore, relatively little is known about the reasons for shutdowns, the mechanism through which governments affect such shutdowns, or the economic and social impacts of shutdowns on telecommunications companies, users, and society at large. Without such information, there is little opportunity to understand the avenues for prevention, mitigation and redress for business, users, or civil society.

The Government of Pakistan’s stated intention in blocking access to communication at such a time is primarily in order to protect the right to life13 as violent extremists use mobile phones to inform each other of their movements and in some cases, mobile phones have been used to detonate bombs. However, many experts argue that network shutdowns violate a range of human rights, and are neither necessary nor proportionate responses to potential violent activities. While the debate is often framed around the resulting restrictions to freedom of expression, network shutdowns also impact other rights, including life, access to health services, education, and work.

The aim is to:
• Analyse the Pakistan context as an introduction to further research on the economic and social impacts of network shutdowns.
• Explore how requests for disconnection are made by authorised agencies to telecommunication operators. • Discuss day­to­day impacts and the perception of Pakistani citizens of network shutdowns,not look into the full economic impact of a shutdown.
• Analyse instances of mobile and Internet shutdowns outside of Pakistan, which were followed by corporate and government campaigns to achieve positive change, such as an amendment in the law.
• Provide best practices and guidelines for telecommunication operators with regard to handling network shutdown requests.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Fireside

10:30am

Security, Technology and Rights: Balancing Needs in a Race to Radicalize and Counter-Radicalize
More than ever before, the intersection of security, technology and rights is being challenged and negotiated among the media, governments, philanthropists, civil society and the technology community. Hear from leaders in these fields who will discuss their opinions on the appropriate balance in a time of rising political violence fueled by ideology, playing out on technology platforms as the race to radicalize and counter-radicalize happens across the globe.

The goal of this session is to have a robust, provocative discussion about the real cost/benefit analysis around national security, human rights and legal rights, against the backdrop a world that is rapidly technologizing.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Stricker

Meredith Stricker

Program Director, Peace and Security Funders Group
Meredith Stricker is currently the Program Director at the Peace and Security Funders Group, a coalition of over 50 funders who work together to enhance peace and security grant making. Before joining PSFG, Ms. Stricker worked on human rights and anti-poverty programs in Africa and Asia, most recently as Executive Director of the Zameer Foundation, which centered efforts on innovative educational opportunities for orphans and vulnerable... Read More →
avatar for Eli Sugarman

Eli Sugarman

Program Officer, Hewlett Foundation
I manage the Cyber Initiative at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Our goal is to help build a robust, multidisciplinary cybersecurity field that serves the public interest by ensuring the security, stability and resilience of connected devices and a free and open Internet.
HU

Haroon Ullah

Member of the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, U.S. Department of State


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Fishbowl

10:30am

The Visual Communication Explosion Online: Where Do Human Rights and Human Rights Users Fit?
YouTube, Facebook and Twitter native video, Snapchat, Periscope and Meerkat.... More and more online and digital tools are becoming photo and video centric. This past year we saw the rise of ephemeral photo and video, live video, and the beginnings of VR. These are increasingly being used by both the ordinary citizen as a tool for free expression and the human rights defender from Ferguson to Rio to the conflict areas of Syria, as well as by perpetrators from ISIS to far-right extremists. How do we consider the particular human rights usages, human rights challenges and human rights value implications of visual media tools ranging from Snapchat, Facebook, Periscope to YouTube?

What are the particular censorship, surveillance and free speech concerns around video and photo tools and products? What are new approaches to how contentious visual content be best handled? How should live video content be handled? What are the particular anonymity concerns around visual media and how should issues of visual anonymity be handled? What does anonymity look like in a video­-mediated world, and how can privacy by design and user­-centric options help enhance this? Where does facial recognition fit in this map? When these visual technologies intersect with potentially ubiquitous wearables and enhanced sensors what are the rights implications and the human rights usages and pitfalls? What are the pros and cons from a human rights perspective of metadata-­rich images and video? What are the human rights and consent implications of live video, and wearable-­mediated live video?

We'll have a focused, candid conversation on how we handle these issues.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Conway

Amanda Conway

YouTube Privacy Lead, Google
avatar for Munyaradzi Dodo

Munyaradzi Dodo

CO -FOUNDER, TV YANGU
I am passionate about telling Africa stories on the internet. TV Yangu is the a v Video On Demand platform from Zimbabwe and we are changing the way the world watches African narratives, one story at a time,
avatar for Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Program Director, WITNESS
In short: video, human rights, citizen participation, role of companies, live video and experiential activism | | In long.... | | Sam Gregory helps people use the power of the moving image and participatory technologies to create human rights change. He is Program Director of WITNESS (www.witness.org), the leading organization supporting millions of people to use video for human rights; he also teaches on human rights and... Read More →
MK

Mona Kareem

Mid East Youth


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Engine

10:30am

Toeing the line – ineffective and unjust national security strategies in MENA
This panel will discuss the continuous strains put on information flow in the Middle East and North Africa region by governments to purportedly fight the threat of terrorism. Governments are increasingly cracking down on human rights advocates, lawyers, and journalists, under the guise of protecting national security.

For example, in November 2015, Egyptian journalist Hossam Bahgat was detained and interrogated after writing and publishing online a report describing criminal convictions against 26 military officers for plotting a coup. He was charged with publishing false news “harmful to national security” – a crime that can be punished with a jail sentence under the new counterterrorism law passed in July 2015. In December 2015, Saudi Arabia sentenced Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh to death for blasphemy after he published a poem likening Saudi Arabia to Daesh. This panel will shed light on new tactics used by MENA governments in targeting users as well as highlight how these tactics have changed since the Arab uprisings in 2010-11.

The panel will also take into account the attacks in Tunisia in June 2015 the refugee crisis in Syria and Iraq. Panel participants will interact in this discussion through answering important and timely questions, such as:

1. Where should governments draw the line in respect to securing respective borders and respecting free flow of information?
2. How can governments effectively fight online recruitment to fundamentalist organizations whilst respecting human rights online such as freedom of expression and privacy?
3. As digital rights advocates, is it even worth looking at the laws individuals are prosecuted under when it comes to “national security”?

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Dheere

Jessica Dheere

Founder/Director, Social Media Exchange
I'm the co-founder and executive director of Social Media Exchange (smex.org), a Beirut–based NGO that since 2008 has been a pioneer in digital journalism, digital advocacy, and digital rights in Lebanon and the Arab region.
avatar for Wafa Ben Hassine

Wafa Ben Hassine

Electronic Frontier Foundation
Wafa Ben Hassine is an Open Technology Fund Fellow working with EFF's international team to research counterterrorism and cybercrime legislation in select Arab countries — Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Tunisia — and how they are used to target human rights defenders and stifle the free expression of regular end users.
avatar for Amin Jobran

Amin Jobran

Outreach Manager - MENA, ASL19
Community coordinator at ASL19 for MENA region (especially Arabic speaking countries) I deal with tool localization, Outreach, and user support. I enjoy neutralizing any content blocking efforts by governments and telecoms.
avatar for Elsa Saade

Elsa Saade

Human Rights Officer - Capacity Building, Advocacy, Research, Gulf Center for Human Rights
avatar for Sana Saleem

Sana Saleem

Director, Bolo Bhi
Co-founder and Director of Bolo Bhi. I am reelance journalist, researcher, rights advocate and public policy consultant. I have written for Dawn, The Guardian and have been writing for Global Voices for the past five years, where I currently work as Editor for Pakistan. In 2012, I was listed among Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers for her work on free speech and was recognized for my work on #BBC100 women of 2014. I am also on the... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Slate

10:30am

Internet Freedom and UN Human Rights Mechanisms
How can civil society and human rights advocates leverage the UN system to amplify or further their advocacy on Internet freedom issues? Under what circumstances should advocates appeal to the UN Special Rapporteur or a Working Group for assistance, and what information should they communicate to the Rapporteur’s office to ensure effective follow-up? How can advocates optimize their participation in the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights Periodic Review and the Universal Periodic Review processes? What are the unique challenges that technology and human rights issues pose to civil society engagement with UN mechanisms?

A roundtable of representatives from various UN human rights mechanisms will address these questions, and the audience will be invited to observe the discussion. There will be opportunities at certain points during the discussion for audience participation.

Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Cottage

10:30am

'The Tools We Make, the Politics We Don't' -- Debate on the politics of liberation tech
Governments and private interests are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their approach to liberation technologies and individual users are increasingly subject to monitoring, censorship, imprisonment and physical harm. However, when it comes to assessing these tools and technologies, the discussion of ‘politics’ is quite often taboo, as creators claim their platforms, products, and projects are apolitical and solely about access and expression. In this debate, we ask whether or not the creators of these technologies are actually engaging as political actors reshaping geopolitics worldwide.

Speakers
avatar for Eve Chaurand

Eve Chaurand

General Counsel & Secretary, Change.org


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Bridge

10:30am

Data Détente: Exploring Challenges and Opportunities in Trans-Atlantic Data Flows
This panel session will evaluate the challenges and opportunities of the upcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and discuss the future of transatlantic data flows, given the European Court of Justice's overturn of the U.S.-E.U. Safe Harbor agreement. The purpose of the panel will be to go beyond debating whether or not there should be regulations: by including legal, technological, and human rights perspectives, the goal is to discuss potential solutions, or grounds for consensus, on trans-­Atlantic data transfers.
The panel will open with a brief summary from each of the panelists of what s/he considers to be the biggest opportunity and the biggest challenge presented by the final version of the Regulation as EU member states approach the two -year implementation phase. Then panelists will field questions about how the GDPR affects issues like consent, data portability, the right to erasure, and data localization. Panelists will be encouraged to give specific examples of how the GDPR and possibly the Privacy Shield will affect people and companies dealing with data transfers to and from Europe and talk about developments in technology that are intended to both deal with and innovate around data privacy.

Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Carter

Kenneth Carter

Counsel, CloudFlare
Ken Carter is Counsel at CloudFlare which has an ambitious goal – build a better Internet. CloudFlare's services protect and accelerate more than 4 million websites by automatically optimizing the delivery of web pages so visitors get the best performance possible. He was recently selected as Bay Area Corporate Counsel of the Year 2016. | | Before joining CloudFlare, Ken was Policy Counsel for Advanced Networks and Access Services at... Read More →
avatar for Fanny Hidvegi

Fanny Hidvegi

International Privacy Fellow, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)
Besides my legal projects about privacy, data protection and freedom of information I have been working on the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union's new website to protect only privacy. Check out righttohide.com and tell me how to improve!
avatar for Max Schrems

Max Schrems

europe-v-facebook.org
Max Schrems, Lawyer, Author and founder of europe-v-facebook.org. Max has studied law in Vienna and California. Since 2011 he has worked on the enforcement of EU data protection law in various ways, including procedures before different data protection authorities and a class action with more than 25.000 members which is currently pending at the Austrian Supreme Court. He has succeeded in his challenge against the “Safe Harbor” system at... Read More →
avatar for Molly Schwartz

Molly Schwartz

Fellow, Metropolitan New York Library Council


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
*The Hub*

10:30am

Help! We are under digital attack! A peek behind the screens of digital security by rapid responders
This interactive session is a collaboration of Digital Defenders Partnership, Front Line Defenders, Media Legal Defence Initiative, VirtualRoad.org, Access Now and a Hivos digital integrity fellow. We want you to leave the room with a better understanding of the process and possible facets of emergency support. We will give you a holistic view of the Emergency Response Ecosystem (Legal, infrastructural, psycho-social, etc. responses) and explore the interconnectedness of our work together with you.

Whether you are an activists, digital security trainer or expert, a company representative, funder, government representative, researcher or non-profit employee, this session will provide you with new resources for emergency response. What do you need in order to mitigate possible threats in the future? What questions do you have regarding digital threats? What do you need from other stakeholders in the room? We invite you to contribute your needs/ideas/questions and come to shared multi-stakeholder action.

Speakers
DB

Daniel Bedoya

Access Now
avatar for Nani Jansen

Nani Jansen

Legal Director, Media Legal Defence Initiative
Nani Jansen is the Legal Director of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI). She is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. Since 2011, she has overseen MLDI’s litigation globally, leading or advising on cases before the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights... Read More →
PZ

Pablo Zavala

Permanent Consultant on Digital Security, Fundación Acceso


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Lab

10:30am

Making Online Dating Secure for the LGBTQI Community
GrindrMap caused a stir back in 2014 when it revealed that Grindr can be easily used to geolocate gay men around the world. That was back in late 2014 and little has been discussed about the security of such appssince. This year some efforts are being made to continue the work, including through ARTICLE19 and The ISC Project. Building off conversations from the International Freedom Festival this year inValencia, we would like to bring the conversation to RightsCon. The goal is to continue identifying the risks and solutions that matter most for the LGBTQI community when using dating apps in environments where their very existence is hostile if not also illegal. Visualising this in a chart which indicates both user and technical features would be an initial goal (see an example from the GrindrMap site here: https://grindrmap.neocities.org/overview.html).

Please join Afsaneh Rigot (ARTICLE19) and Kody Leonard (The ISC Project) at this session to see what work is being done and how you can get involved!

Speakers
AR

Afsaneh Rigot

ARTICLE 19
Article 19 is a London-based human rights organization with a specific mandate and focus on the defense and promotion of freedom of expression and freedom of information worldwide founded in 1987. Afsaneh, as part of the Iran Programme at ARTICLE 19, works on Iran human rights issues, predominately freedom of expression, access to information and right to privacy.


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Nest

10:30am

The Power of Storytelling: Using Needfinding to Design with Users in Mind
Learn the role human-centered design can play in your work. How do you design and execute your own fieldwork and Needfinding engagements to better understand the populations you seek to support? We will walk participants through the process of applying storytelling and role playing elements of the Internet Freedom Needfinding Framework to achieve their mission and work with communities while respecting cultural diversity, security and privacy. This workshop will be hands-on and involve group learning, and fun! Learn from the experiences of the Tibetan community in exile, Vietnamese digital activists, Ugandan human rights defenders and Tunisian journalists. How can the insights from these communities improve the way we achieve Internet Freedom? 

Speakers
LD

Lena Delchad

SecondMuse
MENA, community building and needfinding


Thursday March 31, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Demo Room

12:00pm

Countering Extremism, Free Speech, and Schools
Critically evaluate Countering Violent Extremism (or counterradicalization) initiatives, focusing on impacton free speech, particularly on the Internet and in schools. The program will begin with a conversation aimed at: 1) familiarizing the audience with CVE programs, including those that are being piloted in Boston, Los Angeles and Minneapolis and the UK's Prevent program on which these initiatives are based; 2) articulating how such programs constrict the range of opinions that are considered acceptable, as well as facilitating surveillance of certain communities; 3) highlighting calls for greater monitoring of extremist content on the Internet, and 4) grappling with the particular challenges faced by educators. The program will then turn to an interactive phase in which the moderator will ask the audience to respond to scenarios based on actual programs to trigger an active discussion.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Barbora Bukovská

Barbora Bukovská

Senior Director for Law & Policy, ARTICLE 19
Barbora Bukovská has been ARTICLE 19’s Senior Director for Law and Policy since 2009. She leads on the development of all ARTICLE 19 policies and provides legal oversight and support to legal work across the organization.  Barbora has an extensive experience working with various organisations on a range of human rights issues, including protection from discrimination, access to justice, deprivation of liberty, reproductive... Read More →
avatar for Naheed Qureshi

Naheed Qureshi

Deputy Director, Muslim Advocates
Naheed Qureshi serves as deputy director at Muslim Advocates.  Ms. Qureshi was a founding board member of Muslim Advocates and served for four years as the chair of the fundraising committee.  She brings to Muslim Advocates a deep expertise in public policy with a focus on civil rights issues. Ms. Qureshi worked for the Washington Legislative Office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), where she was responsible for national... Read More →
FL

Frank La Rue

Assistant Director General for Communication and Information at UNESCO


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Bridge

12:00pm

Indigenous solutions: Adapting social media technologies for rights-based advocacy
As we close in on the digital gap, marginalized groups continually slip through the cracks. Particularly indigenous groups who even in developing or developed countries, are often left out of the digital race, falling back because of the lack of access to education and the internet, as well as language barrier.

Speakers from this session with years of experience in dealing with bridging that gap in connecting indigenous communities, will lay the context of the current situation in various levels; setting the scene using the guidelines of Freedom of Expression (FoE), giving examples of how applications like Whatsapp, GoogleDocs and Facebook have been utilized tangibly to disseminate and access information, and the role resource centers in rural indigenous areas have played.

Interactive in nature, the session will draw experiences not just from the speakers but also from the attendees on their experience using social media technologies in human rights advocacy, particularly for marginalized communities.

Discussions will aim to find common challenges globally and seek solutions to be proposed to existing social media applications and develop guideline recommendations to donors, particularly in regards to building capacities of the rural indigenous youth on the use of social media and information exchange.

Speakers

Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fireside

12:00pm

Opening the Black Box: Understanding How Companies Enforce their Rules
Who can we trust with our digital rights? The 2015 Ranking Digital Rights Corporate Accountability Index found that no major tech company provides overall data about the enforcement of their terms of service. At a time where online expression is increasingly regulated by contract, this means that content is removed or user behaviour penalised ‘under the radar’: although we know that companies take down or filter content, or suspend user accounts, we only have anecdotal evidence about the frequency of such measures and the type of content/behavior affected. On various occasions this has brought to light inconsistent company practice on how terms are enforced (see e.g. https://advox.globalvoices.org/2015/08/06/we-will-choke-you-how-indian-women-face-fatal-threats-on-facebook-while-trolls-roam-free/), highlighting the need to have clear company disclosure on this.

Meanwhile, governments expressly encourage companies to restrict content on the basis of their terms of service, sometimes in extra-legal ways, thereby obscuring a form of government-triggered censorship. The White House asked YouTube to review whether the ‘Innocence of Muslims’ video violated its Terms, and the UK government’s counter extremism strategy explicitly mentions online platforms’ Terms & Conditions as an area of interest. The fact that governments view Terms enforcement by companies as a mechanism to restrict content without making formal requests through legal channels, without due process mechanisms, underscores why it is vital that companies are more transparent about their enforcement practices.

In this session we want to discuss with freedom of expression experts, company representatives, and other participants how companies could improve their transparency when it comes to their enforcement practices, and why governments should be transparent about extra-legal requests they make to companies to restrict content as part of their private Terms enforcement:

- why should this information be disclosed?
- what aspects would be most relevant to highlight (type of content or activities, frequency, triggers for enforcement, other)?
- how should companies disclose this kind of information?
- what insights can companies offer on challenges regarding disclosure about Terms of Service enforcement?
- to what extent do companies refer governments to community-flagging mechanisms?
- how should companies treat and report on content reported by governments through community-flagging mechanisms?
- how should this disclosure tie into wider company policies & practices re: ToS enforcement and remedies?

Since no major tech company is currently providing a clear picture of content removals or other sanctions being applied on the basis of their Terms of Service the session is intending to help start a framework for company disclosure around ToS enforcement.

Speakers
avatar for Chinmayi Arun

Chinmayi Arun

Executive Director, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now
avatar for Jillian C. York

Jillian C. York

Director for International Freedom of Expression, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Talk to me about TOS enforcement and censorship on social platforms, or your work in the Middle East and North Africa.


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Nest

12:00pm

Regulating Private Sector Intrusion Technologies & Services
Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) capabilities are rapidly proliferating as a central component of national security and policing operations across the world. Powers to use CNE are often characterised by vague or non-existent codifications in law.

This panel discusses new approaches to regulate private sector services in CNE. In light of recent disclosures and research, we know more about the corporate proliferation of malware and intrusive technologies than ever before. Most research and advocacy on the issue attempts to clarify and expose corporate activities, or has focused on restricting corporate exports through international regulatory mechanisms such as the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Absence of meaningful measures to regulate the hybrid public-private nature of CNE raises an urgent need for critical debate. With this panel, we reveal and critically evaluate laws that regulate how governments may interact with, support, and acquisition services from private actors (whether corporate or individual) as a means to carry out CNE operations. Specifically, we will seek to expand the debate beyond export controls and open new avenues for thinking about this area of regulation. We will raise awareness on current debates, reflect upon success and failures in regulating the private sector in different legal systems, and seek to increase the exchange of knowledge across national jurisdictions.

Speakers
avatar for Ronald Deibert

Ronald Deibert

Director, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto
avatar for Erik Zouave

Erik Zouave

Research Fellow, The Citizen Lab
Erik Zouave is a Research Fellow at Citizen Lab in the Munk Centre of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. He designs and participates in advanced research projects at the intersection of law, policy and technology. He works with civil society and provides comments on surveillance, cybersecurity and human rights to domestic and international bodies. Erik Zouave contributed to the Privacy International Eyes Wide Open campaign, conducting... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fishbowl

12:00pm

“Speed Dating for Marginalized Communities in Online Spaces”
Do you or someone you love advocate for the rights of women, children, LGBT, the disabled or religious minorities? Interested in learning how these communities operate online, the unique threats they face, obstacles to access, and advocacy strategies? Join Freedom House as we host a “speed dating” event with activists from eight different countries (India, Indonesia, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Mexico, Nigeria and Tunisia) at the intersection of these constituencies and online rights. Each activist, representing one or more of these groups, is writing a country assessment report on marginalized communities in online, digital and mobile spaces and will share their work, address questions and network in what promises to be a fun, informative and engaging format. Some are relatively new to the internet governance advocacy space so we invite you to both learn from them and to share your own expertise as well to address threats, obstacles and opportunities in realizing fundamental freedoms online.

Speakers
avatar for Haris Azhar

Haris Azhar

KontraS
Active doing human rights advocacy in Indonesia
avatar for Japleen Pasricha

Japleen Pasricha

Founder- Director, FeminismInIndia.com


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Lab

12:00pm

Reserved
TBA

Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Slate

12:00pm

The Global Cyber-Development Nexus – the use of digital and Information Communication Technologies to advance civic participation in the Global South
Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are powerful enablers of economic, social and democratic development. Technologies can be used to dramatically improve the social, economic and security situation of people and populations. Even in countries where a large part of the population doesn’t have regular access to the internet, ICTs can be used as a tool to engage in social and economic change. Technology is not a panacea, but a tool to be used in fundamentally grassroots action to advance civic engagement aimed at development, connectivity, access to information and individual human rights (or personal security). This panel will showcase grassroots action in the Global South employing ICTs to advance civic participation. It aims to demonstrate the role of technology as a multiplier in these efforts, but that and at the same time these technology-based actions must be connected to local person to person interactions and grassroots efforts in order to produce advancements in economic and social development, and peace and security.

Speakers
AA

Angie Abdelmonem

Researcher and Board Member of HarassMap
avatar for Richard Arbeiter

Richard Arbeiter

Director General, Freedom and Human Rights, Global Affairs Canada
Director General of the Freedom and Human Rights Bureau at Global Affairs Canada
avatar for Chris Doten

Chris Doten

Senior Manager for Technology and Innovation, National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Super interested in global politics and tech - how do you help individuals organize for more democratic societies, and how do you help political institutions keep up with their people as they get swamped by the tech tsunami? | Lead for DemTools initiative (https://dem.tools) designed to put civic tech in the hands of thousands of groups globally.
avatar for Tariq Fancy

Tariq Fancy

Founder, The Rumie Initiative
Founder and CEO of the Rumie Initiative
CT

Christopher Tuckwood

Executive Director, Sentinel Project
Christopher Tuckwood is the co-founder and executive director of the Sentinel Project (www.thesentinelproject.org), a Canadian NGO dedicated to assisting communities threatened by mass atrocities through the use of technology and direct cooperation with the people in harm's way. Chris has a master’s degree in disaster and emergency management from York University (Toronto, Canada) and got his start in atrocity prevention as a student leader... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Engine

12:00pm

Witnessing police violence, on and off the Internet
In case after case, video footage is exposing police abuse to wider audiences but not always delivering justice, and questions about the effectiveness and ethics of those images and the ways in which we share them are only gaining importance. This panel will look at the tools+platforms that people use to document police violence, the ways in which witnesses and police are sharing footage, and how we can better make an impact. Participants will discuss the ways tech and media can overcome obstacles to justice, how to protect the rights of those on both sides of the lens, and the coming challenges for online organizing towards police accountability in the US and abroad. Beyond eyewitness media, we will also address the privacy, access, technology, and accountability issues tied to the most prevalent policy response to date: body­worn cameras.

Speakers
avatar for Malkia Cyril

Malkia Cyril

Executive Director, Center for Media Justice
Malkia A. Cyril is founder and Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice (CMJ) and co-founder of the Media Action Grassroots Network, a national network of community-based organizations working to ensure racial and economic justice in a digital age. A prolific writer and public speaker, Cyril's articles and quotes-- on issues from Net Neutrality and surveillance to the communication rights of prisoners and new strategic communications... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Cottage

12:00pm

Privacy, Anonymity, and Warrantless Access to Subscriber Identification Data
When people communicate with one another over the Internet or the telecommunications network, they mostly do so anonymously in a sense that, even if when their identities are known to each other, they are not known to third parties. Their identities remain within the realm of reasonable expectation of privacy which should be penetrated only upon judicial supervision, i.e., court order under probable grounds. Content or communication metadata can lose their importance if they remain anonymous and the speakers cannot be identified. However, in many jurisdictions subscriber identification data held by the service providers has been given the least level of legal protection, although it reveal protected information. In this session, we want to address the urgent need to ensure that any information that includes, reflects, arises from, or is about a person’s communications and that is not readily available and easily accessible to the general public has been given a strong legal protection as per the necessary and proportionate principles. A couple of talks will present a recent trend or cases in warrantless access to subscriber identification data, especially in the US, the UK, or South Korea where it was revealed that such surveillance is being conducted at a great scale. And other talks from countries where seizure of such information require warrant, for example Canada or Mexico, will explain the principles or discussions behind such restriction. UN Special Rapporteurs will provide concluding observations.

Speakers
avatar for Luis Fernando Garcia

Luis Fernando Garcia

Director, R3D
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Kim

Kelly Kim

General Counsel, Open Net Korea
Kelly Kim is General Counsel of Open Net Korea, a nonprofit, civil society organization founded in 2013 to defend and promote Internet freedom and digital rights in South Korea. She focuses on issues regarding freedom of expression, privacy and mass-surveillance, intermediary liability and Internet governance. Prior to joining Open Net, she worked for the Ministry of Justice of Korea as a Deputy Director at the International Legal Affairs... Read More →
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
avatar for Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

International Rights Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's International Rights Director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Her work in EFF's International Program also focuses on cybersecurity at the intersection of privacy, freedom of expression, and copyright enforcement.


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
*The Hub*

12:00pm

Engaging a Community: Tech Demos and Lightning Talks
"AdvocacyAssembly.org, a MOOC Platform for Advocacy in MENA"
ID: 135 —  Mahmood Enayat (Founder, Small Media)
Advocacy Assembly is a free learning community for human rights activists and journalists. The platform is the brainchild of London based non-for-profit organisation Small Media who designed and built it in 2015. They are in charge of the platform’s maintenance and security. But the platform does not belong to one organisation, instead it is a collaborative space where training organisations from around the world can upload their best training material and reach new audiences. 

"StoryMaker the Secure Storytelling Tool and Trainer"
ID: 280 — Small World News, Inc.
StoryMaker v2 is an open source app helping anyone learn to make great multimedia stories and safely produce and publish them with their mobile device. The final release out of beta comes with the inclusion of a Catalog of new content packs. Content packs provide Lessons, Guides, and Templates for creating new stories. StoryMaker protects users identity by storing files encrypted and enabling users to implement a pin and app-hiding feature to disguise it from perusal of the device. In countries where the internet is censored, StoryMaker allows users to publish to Facebook, YouTube, Soundcloud, Flickr, and elsewhere via Tor. Come see a demo of the StoryMaker app and hear about how it's being used around the world to support activists to tell their own stories with nothing but a mobile phone.

"CoPilot: A Censorship Sandbox for Interactive Digital Security Trainings"
ID: TBA — Internews

"Right to hide – online tools for users (at risk) around the world”
ID: 202 — Fanny Hidvégi (Hungarian Civil Liberties Union)
On top of  global trends and challenges to digital rights, the political and legal changes since 2010 have put Hungarian  journalists, whistleblowers, and activists at a high risk. The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union has realized that our legal expertise and solutions are not effective enough. We decided to create a website for every internet user to promote privacy enhancing technologies in an accessible way and train people how to use them. The site is currently available in English and Hungarian and the Spanish version is on the way. We are looking for partners to create the site in Russian. We can’t wait to hear your feedback and improve the site! What is your favorite tool to protect privacy?

"Verified Pixel" 
ID: 53 — Tom Trewinnard (Meedan)  

Speakers
avatar for Mahmood Enayat

Mahmood Enayat

Founder, Small Media
avatar for Fanny Hidvegi

Fanny Hidvegi

International Privacy Fellow, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)
Besides my legal projects about privacy, data protection and freedom of information I have been working on the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union's new website to protect only privacy. Check out righttohide.com and tell me how to improve!
avatar for Tom Trewinnard

Tom Trewinnard

Programs & Partnerships, Meedan
Meedan


Thursday March 31, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Demo Room

1:15pm

Book Launch: Internet in Mexico — Human Rights in the Digital Environment
This book launch is brought to you by Derechos Digitales, and is conducted entirely in Spanish. This is a Spanish-written book about controversial topics regarding specific internet topics in Mexico: anonymity, gender and harassment, surveillance, net neutrality, online protest and transparent government. The purpose of the book is to foster debate and influence future public policies to strengthen democratic processes within the country. The result is an
academic compilation of over 200 pages with top-end design, unlike any other book in Latin America regarding internet rights.

Thursday March 31, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
The Lab

1:15pm

Hackerspace Movement in North Africa
We will discuss hackerspace movements in North Africa, their present activities and how they collaborate with each other. As well, their ability to create other hackerspaces and how these new hackerspaces are funded: from where we can fund them, how they work, and how it affects their freedom of making or taking decisions.


Thursday March 31, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
The Nest

1:15pm

Trainer Fest: Demos and Lightning Talks
"LevelUp: Building a Digital Security Trainer Network" 
ID: 224 — Nicolas Sera Leyva (Training Programs Manager, ICT & Latin America - Internews) 
LevelUp is a living project that supports individuals worldwide providing digital safety training and education, working to create a thriving global network of digital security trainers who are able to share knowledge, experiences, and resources with other. Over the past year, the project has taken major steps in its evolution, moving from merely an online repository of trainer-created, Creative Commons curricula and teaching modules, to becoming a more vibrant and connected network of global practice. This project demo will look at the challenges associated with building a network around a cross-organizational community resource, the lessons learned, and how those outcomes are reflected in the brand new, long awaited LevelUp project website. 

"USABLE: Tool Feedback Trainings and Building Feedback Loops"
ID: 220 — Megan Deblois (Internews), Jon Camfield (Internews)
USABLE connects communities world-wide with leading UX experts and digital security tool developers through Tool Feedback Trainings to solve real problems, build better tools, and create lasting, re-usable user personas for others to incorporate. After bringing these stakeholders together for an intense 4-day UXForum in early 2016, USABLE will launch the UXFund to target small grants to user-driven usability and accessibility improvements for digital security tools. 

"The Secure Communications Framework: Combining Impact with Adversary Capability and Motivation"
ID: 159 — Tim Sammut (Fellow, Mozilla and Ford Foundation)
The Secure Communications Framework helps security non-experts determine a safe set of tools and practices given what they know about their work. The SCF was created for human rights researchers but has been released into the public domain for adaptation by anyone. This session will provide an overview of what the SCF is and is not, and how best to adapt it for your situation.

"Best Thing Since Sliced Bread: an innovative methodology on how to sustain and manage digital security at the organizational level in the human rights space"
ID: 273 —  Tanya Lockwood (Executive Director, Fundación Acceso), Pablo Zavala (Permanent Consultant on Digital Security, Fundación Acceso)
This will be a hands-on presentation of a new methodology that has been proven to be effective, and seeks to be adapted and replicated in different contexts. The methodology is a collaborative awareness and learning processes built by digital defenders targeted to human rights organizations' Executive Directors and Board Members to better manage privacy and digital security policies and practices.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Camfield

Jon Camfield

Senior Technologist, Internews ; USABLE
Tools, training, threats, organizational security, SAFETAG.org, usability and our https://usable.tools project, and more!
MD

Megan Dubois

Internews
TL

Tanya Lockwood

Executive Director, Fundación Acceso
TS

Tim Sammut

Fellow, Mozilla/Ford Foundation
avatar for Nicolas Sera-Leyva

Nicolas Sera-Leyva

Training Programs Manager - ICT & Latin America, Internews
Nicolas Sera-Leyva leads initiatives in support of digital security training and trainer network building, from within the ICT Programs and Policy team at Internews. He currently leads the LevelUp project (https://www.level-up.cc), an effort that seeks to support individuals worldwide providing digital safety training and education, by co-creating spaces for building shared values of what effective training looks like, how to deliver effective... Read More →
PZ

Pablo Zavala

Permanent Consultant on Digital Security, Fundación Acceso


Thursday March 31, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
The Demo Room

2:30pm

Armed conflict & Internet: safe spaces for civilians
Internet Freedom & connectivity during conflicts are crucial for activists to assemble, organize, create channels of communication and humanitarian aid. We'd like to organize a roundtable where activists would present case studies on  how Internet is essential for civilians in conflict zones, from their experience and perspective. Then we'll discuss with Security experts on how to imagine innovative solutions to create a tool that would help citizens communicate and organize in conflict-zones.
Speakers:
Live testimonies from Africa - http://rightscon.sched.org/speaker/andreapapusngombetmalewa
http://rightscon.sched.org/cyriacgbogou1

Security Experts Perspective
http://rightscon.sched.org/richardbrooks
http://rightscon.sched.org/speaker/gustafbjorksten

Speakers
GB

Gustaf Bjorksten

Chief Technologist, Access Now
avatar for Cyriac Gbogou

Cyriac Gbogou

Co-founder, Ovillage
Né le 02 septembre 1980 à Kpada (Soubré, Côte d’Ivoire), village situé au sud ouest et capitale du cacao ivoirien, Cyriac Gbogou parcourt pendant des années une partie du continent africain avec ses parents en qualité d’étudiant-résident respectivement au Sénégal, Togo, Mali et au Congo-Brazzaville. Il rentre définitivement en Côte... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Papus NGOMBET MALEWA

Andrea Papus NGOMBET MALEWA

Coordinator, Collectif Sassoufit
I'm the coordinator of the campaign against the dictator Denis Sassou Nguesso


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Slate

2:30pm

Mapping the Landscape for Online Removal Requests: A Research Workshop w/the Berkman Center's Lumen Project
Lumen is a research project located at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society devoted to collecting and analyzing requests to remove material from online. Our goals are to educate the public, to facilitate research about the different kinds of complaints and requests for removal--both legitimate and questionable--that are being sent to Internet publishers and service providers, and to provide as much transparency as possible about the “ecology” of such notices, in terms of who is sending them and why, and to what effect.
The requests, indexed by topic and stored in our searchable database, include DMCA takedown notices submitted by the individual senders or recipients, including Internet providers and hosts such as Google, Twitter, Reddit, Wikipedia, Wordpress, and others. The database also includes requests for removal based on different concerns from copyright, ranging from privacy and trademark to “revenge porn” and defamation.
Recently, as part of an effort to more accurately reflect the global nature of the removal request ecosystem, Lumen announced a new international vision and plans, as well as pilot partnerships with teams at top research centers in India, Italy and Brazil.
Lumen would like to open the workshop with a brief introduction to the project and its history as well as a with a short tour and demonstration of the site and its API, including a live demonstration of how to: submit notices to Lumen with the site’s webform; submit notices through the site’s API; query the database with the site’s search function and; query the database through the API We do not foresee this “Tech Demo” piece of things taking longer than 10 minutes.
Once attendees are familiar with Lumen, we will begin an open discussion about: the possible research opportunities Lumen’s database affords, and how we can help to both facilitate such research and expand the research community; other possible uses for the database that we may not have considered, ways in which we might most successfully seek out other sources of notices to make the database more comprehensive and useful; and finally, what improvements for the site the project might focus on in 2016. The session will be primarily centered around research, but also will examine ways to expand the corpus of data on which the research will rely and to improve the tools available.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Bavitz

Chris Bavitz

Clinical Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Christopher T. Bavitz is the WilmerHale Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, where he co-teaches the Counseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age seminar and teaches the seminar, Music & Digital Media. He is also Managing Director of HLS’s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. And, he is a Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Center. Chris concentrates his practice on intellectual property and... Read More →
avatar for Adam Holland

Adam Holland

| | Adam is a Project Coordinator at the Berkman Center, where he works primarily on the Lumen project, but also assists with avariety of other intiatives. His research interests include copyright law; human performance, wearables, big data and the "narcissome"; and anywhere technology might provide a path to creating what Kim Stanley Robinson has called "sustainable utopias." | Adam has a bachelor’s degree in Folklore & Mythology... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Fishbowl

2:30pm

Reporting and beyond: why company and government transparency is essential for human rights online.
Significant progress has been made on increasing transparency around the interaction between companies and governments with regard to access to user information, content restriction and network shutdown.

This interactive session will discuss why transparency in this regard is important to the protection and promotion of freedom of expression and privacy online. We will address what we know and don’t know from companies and governments, and how both parties can best provide information to the public. What makes an effective transparency report, from companies and from governments? What other tools and strategies can both parties use to educate individuals about issues that implicate their rights?

In a multistakeholder setting, and drawing upon the expertise of the session participants, the session will look at existing initiatives (including the Hong Kong Transparency Report, the Taiwan Internet Transparency Report and the Korea Internet Transparency Report), best practices and emerging issues (including extremist content online) with regards to government transparency.

Additionally, the session will explore how we can increase collaboration to further these practices around the world.

Speakers
avatar for Charles Bradley

Charles Bradley

Head of Strategy, Global Partners Digital
avatar for Ming-Syuan Ho

Ming-Syuan Ho

Project Officer, Taiwan Internent Transparency Report
Hi, all. I'm running the Taiwan Internet Transparency Report.
avatar for Katharine Kendrick

Katharine Kendrick

WG3 co-chair, FOC
JS

Jiwon Sohn

Researcher, Korea Internet Transparency Reporting
avatar for Liz Woolery

Liz Woolery

Open Technology Institute
avatar for Benjamin Zhou

Benjamin Zhou

Project Manager, Hong Kong Transparency Report
Hong Kong Transparency Report is an independent project under Journalism and Media Study Centre of The University of Hong Kong. We report on user data content removal requests in Hong Kong.


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Fireside

2:30pm

The Activist's Toolbox: Strategies for Effective User Rights Advocacy

This is a hands-on activism strategy session and workshop for activists, policy advocates, technologists, and others involved in digital rights advocacy at the local or global level. It will cover the tools we use in our activism campaigns and unpack some hard-earned lessons on crafting effective campaigns.

In particular, we will discuss how to design issue-specific campaigns to engage with audiences beyond the core group of interested activists. This means taking digital policy issues related to freedom of speech, privacy, and access to knowledge concerns to people and communities who may not see how they are affected by those policies.

We will also unpack EFF's activism toolbox and walk through our techniques for amplifying our campaigns, including messaging and branding, social media tips, ways to identify political targets, and building coalitions at both the local and international level. The purpose of this workshop is for everyone to come away with new tactics and strategies to bring about better policies and tools to safeguards our rights on digital platforms.

Speakers
avatar for Shahid Buttar

Shahid Buttar

Director of Grassroots Advocacy, EFF
Shahid is a constitutional lawyer focused on the intersection of community organizing and policy reform. He led the Bill of Rights Defense Committee as Executive Director from 2009 to 2015, and graduated from Stanford Law School in 2003. Outside of work, he DJs and produces electronic music, kicks rhymes, writes poetry & prose, and speaks truth to power on Truthout.
avatar for Maira Sutton

Maira Sutton

Global Policy Analyst, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Maira leads international campaigns on copyright, innovation, and access to knowledge issues, including opposing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement. She also tracks how the overreach of copyright can be used to hinder access to knowledge and silence criticism and news online.


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Nest

2:30pm

The interplay between human rights and technology: policies and regulations in the MENA and Latin America regions
The interplay between technology and human rights is challenged by legal frameworks that regulate freedoms and privacy among other fundamental human rights on the Internet ecosystem. This is particularly manifested in developing countries where the advancement of human rights on the Internet is still hindered by legal frameworks that are complex, inconsistent and hard to interpret. Challenges include but not limited to lack of transparency, fuzzy Internet legislation with loopholes, absence of specific laws to regulate the Internet environment, lack of consultation with the community as well as poor understanding of the Internet governance process at large.

Within this context, the workshop brings legal, technical and policy expertise to moot the complex legal concepts vis-à-vis the relationship between technology and human rights. The focus is on the legal protection afforded to online freedom of expression, privacy and other digital rights and its compliance with the international human rights standards. For this purpose, the workshop refrains from tackling these concepts in abstract and aims to discuss their implementation in the regional context of the Middle East and North Africa as well as Latin America.

The workshop spotlights the practices in MENA region through sharing key findings of the research conducted by the Internet Legislation Atlas project, which is an initiative to assess and visualize the level of compliance of selected digital rights in seven MENA countries apropos international human rights standards. The main objectives are therefore to get feedback to inform improvement to the ILA methodology, discuss the technical deployment of the ILA platform, and develop better understanding of what would be most useful to civil society groups, and how ILA project might support this. The aim is also to learn from the experience of different region through presenting Red LatAm project which investigates Internet regulations and public policies in several Latin American countries as well as the threats and opportunities for the rights in the local digital environment.

Speakers
avatar for Walid Al-Saqaf

Walid Al-Saqaf

Postdoctoral Researcher, Stockholm University
ISOC Board Member, software developer from Yemen, internet freedom advocate. Currently involved in postdoctoral research and teaching in areas related to technology, media, journalism, data science, and quantitative research methods. Also involved in ICANN and APC.
avatar for Ali Bangi

Ali Bangi

Co-Director, ASL19
My work focuses on bypassing internet censorship in Iran.
avatar for Hanane Boujemi

Hanane Boujemi

Senior Manager Internet Governance Programme MENA Region, Hivos
Manager of Hivos’ MENA region programme on Internet Governance. She is responsible for the design and implementation of the programme in the Arab region. | | • Develop and implement programs and activities to build capacity on Internet Governance and policy among civil society organizations and actors in the Arab region | • Facilitate strategy development and other technical assistance activities | • Lead all areas of... Read More →
avatar for Noha Fathy

Noha Fathy

Project Lead, Internet Legislation Atlas, Hivos Internet Governance for MENA region
Noha is managing Internet Legislation Atlas project for Hivos. She has been working with Hivos Internet Governance in the Middle East and North Africa (iGmena) program (www.igmena.org) since 2013. | | She concentrates on internet governance capacity building and awareness raising activities to civil society in the Arab region. She worked on a number of projects that aimed at raising awareness about digital rights, engaging local... Read More →
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →
avatar for Roula Mekhael

Roula Mekhael

Executive Director, Maharat Foundation
Roula Mikhael is the Executive Director of Maharat Foundation and a journalist. Maharat Foundation is a Lebanese Watchdog organization leading advocacy actions to reform media laws in Lebanon. Since its establishment, Maharat has formed an in depth practical oriented training program targeting journalists, journalism students and activists in order to build their capacities on media and Human Rights, built partnership with media faculties and... Read More →
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Bridge

2:30pm

Ensuring Users' Rights are part of Internet Governance Debates
This session is an audience discussion exploring how the institutions involved in shaping the Internet can be more responsive to advocates for human rights. The last couple years have seen a large increase in both the number of meetings devoted to "Internet governance" and in the number of people participating in them. In addition to meetings of long-established organizations like the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and ICANN, which shape Internet standards and the domain name system, the Council of Europe and the OECD are attempting to define international norms in areas like online privacy, cybercrime, and cybersecurity, and we have seen new efforts, including dozens of national and regional IGF meetings, the Net Mundial conference in Brazil, and the Wuzhen World Internet Conference in China. More and more time and attention are being paid to human rights at these meetings. Panels on privacy, security, censorship, and surveillance are framing the debate, affecting technology choices, and influencing national Internet policies.

Moreover, over the past few years, institutions dealing with critical issues of Internet policy and governance have laid out commonly accepted principles of good governance, for example the NETmundial Principles. They call for ­ governance structures that are­ governance structures that are inclusive, transparent and accountable, but how do we uphold those principles? The session will examine how best to put these governance principles into practice.
 
Outcomes :

1) More awareness among members of the human rights community about how they could affect Internet governance decisions.
2) Creative suggestions for making the IGF, ICANN, the OECD ministerial conference, and other institutions involved in shaping the Internet more transparent and accountable, and responsive to advocates for human rights online.

Speakers
avatar for Farzaneh Badiei

Farzaneh Badiei

Associate Researcher, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society
Farzaneh Badiei is an associate researcher at Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society. She is finalizing her PhD at the Institute of Law and Economics, Hamburg University, Germany. Farzaneh’s research focuses on the institutional design of online private justice systems in commercial contexts. She is also interested in studying online intermediaries such as social networks and payment intermediaries and their justice systems, using a... Read More →
AP

Adam Peake

civil society engagement, ICANN
I'm responsible for ICANN's relations with civil society organizations, supporting non-commercial participation in ICANN's multi-stakeholder model. Before joining ICANN in December 2014, I worked for more than two decades as a researcher at the Center for Global Communications (GLOCOM), International University of Japan, on projects related to telecommunications and Internet policy. I was one of the civil society representatives during WSIS... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Puddephatt

Andrew Puddephatt

Director, global partners digital
Director of Global Partners and Association
avatar for Karen Rose

Karen Rose

Internet Society
Karen has been active across Internet technology, policy, and development for nearly 20 years, including prior roles in Internet start-ups, government, and management consulting. She began her career in public policy working on Internet and e-commerce issues at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. She later joined the National Telecommunications and Information Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce where her work focused on the... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Cottage

2:30pm

Do it yourself! Can the next billion build its own Internet connectivity?
All individuals have the potential to create community networks in a collaborative mode, fostering digital inclusion and digital literacy as well as empowering users and local communities alike.

To date, community networks have been successfully deployed in several countries going from India to Latin America, passing through Europe. This session will analyse the main regulatory, economic, social, and organisational aspects of the community connectivity debate, from different stakeholders’ perspectives. Participants will discuss concrete cases of community networks around the world, trying to find out how to overcome common difficulties, and identifying best practices that facilitate the deployment of community networks as well as worst practices that can hinder their expansion. Particularly, such exercise will consider both technical solutions and (inter)national policies that can play an instrumental role in fostering Internet connectivity in a sustainable and democratic fashion.

So far, the deployment and diffusion of community connectivity has relied on the relentless efforts of ingenious and expert engineers. But what if every individual had the possibility of creating its ‘own’ connectivity?

Speakers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →
BF

Bob Frankston

Member of the Board of Governors, IEEE Consumer Electronics Society
avatar for Raoul Plommer

Raoul Plommer

Board member, Effi ry
DIY-Connectivity with MESH, Digital rights, Pirate Parties
avatar for Chris Riley

Chris Riley

Head of Public Policy, Mozilla
I operate in the area of Internet policy, coming from a law and technology background. My motivation is the belief that an open Internet delivers tremendous socioeconomic benefits, and that if we as a global society don't "get" Internet policy more often than not, those benefits will go away. That path took me from computer science, to copyright, to telecom, to Internet freedom, presenting me with many opportunities to do some interesting and... Read More →
avatar for Ritu Srivastava

Ritu Srivastava

Senior Programme Manager, Digital Empowerment Foundation
I am working with Digital Empowerment Foundation as Senior Programme Manager. Having experience in FoE, open spectrum; and gender and access issues.


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Lab

2:30pm

Driving a Paradigm Shift toward Human Rights-respecting Cybersecurity policy by design
The goal of the roundtable is to jump start a paradigm shift toward rights-respecting approaches to cybersecurity. The roundtable participants will explore how and where stakeholders can influence global cybersecurity policy making and foster rights-based approaches to cybersecurity. The roundtable will comprise individuals with extensive expertise in human rights, business, cryptography and national security, and will further the debate on the relationship between governance, security, and fundamental rights and freedoms online. The roundtable will focus specifically on the need for cybersecurity policy to be rights-respecting by design, and debate how to ensure that not only cybersecurity policies but also related policy development and decision¬making protect and respect human rights from their inception.

The workshop will use the draft recommendations from the Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) Working Group 1 on “Internet free and secure” as a basis for the discussion. The Working Group is a multistakeholder initiative comprising government members (the Netherlands, the United States and Canada), as well as individuals from the private sector, civil society and academia. A draft version of the recommendations can be found here: https://www.freedomonlinecoalition.com/wp-content/uploads/20a15/11/FOC-WG1-Recommendations-discussion-draft-IGF-2015-new.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Richard Arbeiter

Richard Arbeiter

Director General, Freedom and Human Rights, Global Affairs Canada
Director General of the Freedom and Human Rights Bureau at Global Affairs Canada
avatar for Rafik Dammak

Rafik Dammak

Non-commercial Stakeholder Group former Chair, NTT
He is engineer working and living in Japan. He is member of the steering committee for the Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles . He has been involved in ICANN community as NCUC (Non-commercial users constituency) individual user member, former elected GNSO Councillor for the Non-Commercial Stakeholder Group, ICANN nomcom member in addition to his participation in several ICANN WGs like the new gTLD applicant support where he was... Read More →
avatar for Ronald Deibert

Ronald Deibert

Director, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto
avatar for Camille M. Francois

Camille M. Francois

Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
avatar for Alex  Keller

Alex Keller

Systems Security Engineer, Stanford School of Engineering
Operational focus on defensive security, systems architecture, virtualization, and networking. Coach of the Stanford Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition student team and active member of the California Cybersecurity Task Force.
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Association for Progressive Communications
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Riana Pfefferkorn

Riana Pfefferkorn

Cryptography Fellow, Stanford Center for Internet and Society
avatar for Chris Riley

Chris Riley

Head of Public Policy, Mozilla
I operate in the area of Internet policy, coming from a law and technology background. My motivation is the belief that an open Internet delivers tremendous socioeconomic benefits, and that if we as a global society don't "get" Internet policy more often than not, those benefits will go away. That path took me from computer science, to copyright, to telecom, to Internet freedom, presenting me with many opportunities to do some interesting and... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier

Security technologist, cryptographer, privacy specialist, and author
Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a "security guru" by The Economist. He is the author of 13 books -- including "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World" -- as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His influential newsletter "Crypto-Gram" and his blog "Schneier on Security" are read by over 250,000 people. He has testified before Congress... Read More →
BS

Bernard Shen

Assistant General Counsel, Microsoft


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
*The Hub*

2:30pm

Good Policy Practices in Online Freedom
In 2014 and 2015, companies participating in the Telecommunications Industry Dialogue published reports on the legal frameworks surrounding government access to communications data and power to restrict content in 44 countries. This online resource highlights some of the challenges facing telecommunications companies that seek to respect freedom of expression and privacy in their global operations. Many countries lack a clear and transparent legal framework surrounding these powers, and governments may also require unrestricted direct access into companies’ infrastructure as a condition of operating in certain countries. The reports also reveal good practice with regard to clarity, oversight, and access to remedy. This panel will seek to explore some of the good practices reflected in these laws, ways in which telecommunications companies operate can comply with local laws while respecting international human rights standards, and ideas for next steps for the legal frameworks project.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Engine

2:30pm

Trainer Fest: Security in Context
"Security in Context: Research findings on the impact of digital security capacity-building"
ID: 153/265 — Carol Waters (Tactical Tech)

Speakers
CW

Carol Waters

Tactical Tech


Thursday March 31, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Demo Room

4:00pm

Protecting and Promoting the Rights of LGBT Persons to Freedom of Expression and Access to Information: The Role of the UN Special Rapporteur
Over the next few years, the UN Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression will focus on the rights of LGBT persons to freedom of expression and access to information. Among the issues that the Rapporteur and his team will examine are: (1) measures the ICT sector takes that protects or adversely impacts the digital expression of LGBT persons; (2) restrictions on access to information about sexuality and health, particularly online; and (3) the relationship between religious freedom and the rights to freedom of expression and access to information of LGBT persons.

The Special Rapporteur and his legal advisor will begin the session by presenting a draft agenda and work plan for engaging with LGBT-related issues.

After the presentation, all interested stakeholders – including civil society representatives and the ICT sector – will be invited to workshop the agenda and work plan. The audience will be encouraged to comment on and suggest changes to the issues and advocacy outcomes articulated in the draft agenda and work plan, which will be flashed on the screen and edited live per the audience’s contributions.

Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Bridge

4:00pm

Respecting Human Rights in the On-Demand Economy
The on-demand economy has revolutionized the way workers secure a stable income and consumers access products and services. However, as on-demand business models evolve it is increasingly clear that the legal and regulatory environment designed to protect consumers and workers is outdated. The governance gap has highlighted new and evolving human rights risks and opportunities for the sector.

This panel will highlight ways the private sector, government and civil society can maximize the benefits and promise of on-demand business models while protecting the human rights of workers and users. Panelists will focus on three emerging human rights risks—labor protections, discrimination and safety—and assess the degree to which current solutions have effectively reduced risk. We will then look to lessons learned from the governance gap left by globalization to determine whether the on-demand economy could capitalize on existing tools from the private sector to further advance corporate respect for human rights. This may include User Code of Conducts, auditing protocols and technological advances to limit opportunities for discrimination.

Speakers
avatar for Chloe Poynton

Chloe Poynton

Principal, Article One
Chloe is a Principal at Article One, a business & human rights consulting firm that works with companies, institutions, and state agencies to develop and implement strategies to promote corporate respect for human rights.
avatar for Andreas Weigend

Andreas Weigend

Lecturer, UC Berkeley
Dr. Andreas Weigend is interested in the impact of the social data revolution on individuals, business, and society. He was the Chief Scientist of Amazon, now teaches at Stanford and UC Berkeley, and directs the Social Data Lab. | He advises innovative startups and regularly consults for large corporations including Alibaba, BMW, GE, Lufthansa, MasterCard, Tencent and the World Economic Forum.. | Andreas received his Ph.D. in physics from... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Slate

4:00pm

Finding Solutions Through Collaboration: Hub Table Sessions
"Civil society engagement towards the OECD Ministerial Meeting on Digital Economy in Mexico 2016"
ID: 61 —Suso Baleato (CSISAC), Alberto Cerda (Ford Foundation), Katitza Rodriguez (Electronic Frontier Foundation), Carolina Botero (Karisma), Luis Fernando Garcia (R3D/Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales), Claudio Ruiz (Derechos Digitales), Miguel Morachimo (Hiperderecho), Jazmin Acuña Cantero (TEDIC), Carolina Rossini (Public Knowledge), Michael Baak (Public Knowledge), Antonio Martínez Velázquez (Horizontal), Luca Belli (Center of Technology and Society at Getulio Vargas Foundation), Paulina Gutierrez (Article 19), Fanny Hidvegi (EPIC)
The goal of the session is to facilitate civil society engagement with the OECD Ministerial Meeting on “Digital Economy: Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity” in Mexico, 2016. The main themes of the Ministerial are very relevant to Rights Con’s community including Internet openness and innovation, Internet of Things, metrics on privacy and security, and broadband access. We would like to encourage the participation in the civil society event that will be held in advance of the OECD Ministerial. 
Civil society is represented in the OECD by the Civil Society Information Society Advisory Council (CSISAC). Our goal is to effectively represent civil society’s interest with regard to Internet policies and ensure the presence of a broad variety of NGOs with a special emphasis on Latin America in 2016. Organizations that are not CSISAC members yet would learn more about the process and the discussion could attract new participants. We would like to expand the CSISAC network, to enable ongoing participation by civil society organizations in the work of the OECD.

"Reinforce alternative media in Brazil: the successful case of collaborative coverage by the Youth"
ID: 264  — Florence Poznanski (head of Brazilian Desk, Internet Without Borders), TBA (Midia activist, Midia NINJA)
Freedom of expression is often subject to violations in Brazil. The media system is centralized and subject to a monopoly by the private sector. This does not allow a diversity of narratives. For several years now, numerous alternative media initiatives emerged on the Internet, in order to offer another perspective on the news. Other initiatives aim at helping young citizens develop their critical thinking on the news they read or watch, thanks to "educommunication" programs developed in schools. In this context, we have developed a methodology that associates these two important actions: content creation through collaborative coverage. This allows not only to create unseen information content that reflects preoccupation of the youth, but also to train these youth to become opinion shapers. Our aim with this workshop at RightsCon is to introduce our methodology and create a worldwide network of activists who practice or are interested in this approach. The 3 hours long workshop will consist in two parts: presentation of the methodology and discussion among participants on perspectives to enrich the methodology, based on discussions with participants.

"Digital Rights in Civil Society"
ID: 315  — Andrew Woods (University of Kentucky), Rob Reich (Stanford University), Lucy Bernholz (Stanford University), Heather West (Mozilla Foundation), Marcio Vasconcelos Pinto (Porticus Foundation), Mitchell Stevens (Stanford University), Kevin Gallagher (Freedom of the Press Foundation)
Nonprofit organizations employ close to 10% of the U.S. workforce and deliver billions of dollars of services every year. The so-called “independent” sector is entangled with business and government in myriad ways, and often largely indistinguishable from its corporate and government partners. Yet the independent sector is often missing from debates about the proper scope of digital rights. A growing literature outlines what customers ought to expect from Internet companies and what citizens ought to expect from their government, or conversely, what rights customers and citizens have over the use of their own data. But what should we expect of nonprofits and NGOs that provide web services and collect or aggregate data? Are those rights different from the digital rights one might demand of a public or private sector organization?

"Censorship by Proxy – Making Intermediaries Liable for Internet Cleanse"
ID: 304 — K.S. Park, Nanjira Sambuli
Intermediaries such as social media and blogging platforms, on-line marketplaces and review forums are indispensable to the functioning of the Internet as we know it. Most of the countries across the world provide intermediaries immunity from liabilities that arise out of unlawful content posted on these platforms. However, recent instances of online hate speech and radicalizaton have led to demands on these platforms, often by political leaders, to monitor content and to cleanse them. The monitoring and cleansing of online content results in these platforms being made responsible for adjudicating on the lawful nature of content. There is a counter argument that these platforms are best placed to remove content quickly before it creates any damage. The panel will discuss the following issues: Monitoring and Content take-down – is it censorship by proxy? Safe-harbor provisions for intermediaries Recommendations for a balanced intermediary liability regime

"Local Color: Harnessing art to articulate and confront human rights issues"
ID: 241 — Henry Peck (Legal Coordinator, Human Rights Watch), Meara Sharma (Cultural writer, editor and radio producer, Guernica/WNYC)
Can political art can be harnessed to further human rights objectives? In this session, we will discuss collectives and individuals (ie. Abounaddara: Syrian video collective; Nao Bustamante: Chicana performance artist; Theaster Gates: Chicago-based social practice artist) who are using art and performance as a tool for communication and advocacy. We’ll examine the role of art in revealing human rights violations as well as putting pressure on power systems and creating change. The session will also consider how technology can facilitate political art and help amplify its impact.

Speakers
MB

Michael Baak

Public Knowledge
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →
LB

Lucy Bernholz

Stanford U
AC

Alberto Cerda

Ford Foundation
avatar for Kevin Gallagher

Kevin Gallagher

Systems Administrator, Freedom of the Press Foundation
Kevin Gallagher is the Systems Administrator for Freedom of the Press Foundation. He is a writer, activist and certified GNU/Linux expert who is enthusiastic about privacy, security and freedom of information. In 2012 he created Free Barrett Brown, a support network, advocacy organization and legal defense fund formed for the purpose of assisting a prominent jailed American journalist. In his spare time he also works... Read More →
avatar for Fanny Hidvegi

Fanny Hidvegi

International Privacy Fellow, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)
Besides my legal projects about privacy, data protection and freedom of information I have been working on the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union's new website to protect only privacy. Check out righttohide.com and tell me how to improve!
avatar for Miguel Morachimo

Miguel Morachimo

Director, Hiperderecho
Miguel Morachimo is a lawyer from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and the director of the nonprofit Hiperderecho, a Peruvian civil organization devoted to facilitating public understanding, research, promotion, and observance of human rights and freedoms in the digital world. His work has been featured in all major news outlets in Peru and he has participated in congressional hearings and several major international conferences. His... Read More →
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
HP

Henry Peck

Legal Coordinator, Human Rights Watch
avatar for Marcio Vasconcelos Pinto

Marcio Vasconcelos Pinto

CEO, MVP Consulting
Porticus Foundation
avatar for Florence Poznanski

Florence Poznanski

Head of Brazil Desk, Internet Sem Fronteiras - Brasil
Head of Brazilian Desk, Internet Without Borders
RR

Rob Reich

Stanford University
avatar for Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

International Rights Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's International Rights Director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Her work in EFF's International Program also focuses on cybersecurity at the intersection of privacy, freedom of expression, and copyright enforcement.
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
MS

Meara Sharma

Cultural writer, editor and radio producer, Guernica/WNYC
MS

Mitchell Stevens

Standford University
avatar for Antonio Martínez Velázquez

Antonio Martínez Velázquez

Cofounder, Horizontal
Horizontal
AW

Andrew Woods

Faculty, University of Kentucky Law School


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
*The Hub*

4:00pm

Mapping the Funding Landscape of Marginalized Communities
The digital rights and human rights space is made up of a diverse set of actors, many with distinct programmatic, technologic, and funding needs.  This workshop will map this landscape with respect to various populations: women, LGBT, developers, indigenous groups, etc..  We will break up into population working groups with the goals of answering specific questions:

  1. What are the current threats presenting barriers to distinct populations obtaining outcomes?
  2. What tools could help these barriers be overcome?
  3. What funding resources exist specifically for these populations?
  4. In what ways is the current funding schemes failing these populations?

The breakout groups will reconvene at the end of the session to report back on where they each see their distinct population’s threats and resources, and the session organizers will compile the materials in an outcomes document.  Our goal is to not only distribute this information to relevant funders, but also to compile a population-specific resource guide.

Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Lab

4:00pm

Spectrum Policy and the Right to Communicate
This session will focus on the domestic and global challenges to spectrum policy. On the domestic front, the panel will discuss what type of policies can be put in place to improve spectrum policy and increase access to Wi-Fi and other similar connectivity technologies. The panelists will also discuss the importance Wi-Fi has education, emergency services, and health care. Globally, this session will cover how changes in technology allow a movement away from spectrum policy primarily dominated by exclusive licensing and to expand the availability of licensed exempt spectrum and hybrid license exempt/licensed models. Participants will share how this change has enabled private companies, NGOs, and communities globally to provide affordable connectivity. The workshop will examine how changes in policy can create new opportunities for affordable and community­ based wireless, and how this should change the articulation of the public interest standard in the 21st Century.

The goal of this panel is to raise public awareness about the need for more access to unlicensed spectrum in the United States and to provide a better understanding of the importance of spectrum policy globally. The panel will also help equip civil society with information and tools to engage in spectrum policy discussions in their own countries and also in international debates.

Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Fireside

4:00pm

Mobilizing Internet Users to Action: Lightning Talks
"Mobil-Eyes Us: Using Live Video and the Power of Networks for Smart Activism"
ID: 227 — Sam Gregory (Program Director, WITNESS)
‘Mobil-Eyes Us’ uses the power of live mobile video to connect you to direct experience of causes you care about, and then use disruptive tools from the collaboration economy to provide you meaningful ways you can act by doing what you do best. We know that millions of people globally take actions for issues they care about – but frequently their only option is a click to donate or sign a petition. Often they don’t feel connected to the issues or the actions ­and usually the available actions are also not a good use of their skills, leverage or capacity. What if we could create a ‘witnessing’ corps of people ready to tune in live? What if, using live video, we could bring supporters into a human rights or other social justice situation at the right time to fully experience the reality? And then ask them to use their unique skills, leverage, or networks to take action – for example to deter illegal violence by their group presence, to rapidly share a stream or invite others to act as well, or to provide direct legal guidance? Through an effective integration of technologies with storytelling and movement­-building, we are building out prototypes and doing pilots to help people feel more experientially connected to causes they care about and then take actions that matter. Join us!

"Introducing: Library Freedom Project"
ID: 247 — Nima Fatemi (Member, The Tor Project and Chief Technologist, Library Freedom Project)
This talk will outline the mission of the Library Freedom Project and our work in libraries, empowering local communities to take back their privacy rights, including the Tor exit relay project which grabbed headlines last year after the Department of Homeland Security tried to intervene.

"HERSTORY: The History of Feminist Movement in Pakistan & The Subcontinent "
ID: 237 

"Binary Choice or Balancing Test: The fundamental challenge of the encryption debate."
ID: 255

"Digital Rights Watch Australia" 
ID: 349 — Lizzie O'Shea (Digital Rights Watch Australia)

Speakers
NF

Nima Fatemi

Member, The Tor Project and Chief Technologist, Library Freedom Project
avatar for Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Program Director, WITNESS
In short: video, human rights, citizen participation, role of companies, live video and experiential activism | | In long.... | | Sam Gregory helps people use the power of the moving image and participatory technologies to create human rights change. He is Program Director of WITNESS (www.witness.org), the leading organization supporting millions of people to use video for human rights; he also teaches on human rights and... Read More →
LO

Lizzie O'Shea

Board members, Digital Rights Watch
Digital Rights Watch Australia
avatar for Sana Saleem

Sana Saleem

Director, Bolo Bhi
Co-founder and Director of Bolo Bhi. I am reelance journalist, researcher, rights advocate and public policy consultant. I have written for Dawn, The Guardian and have been writing for Global Voices for the past five years, where I currently work as Editor for Pakistan. In 2012, I was listed among Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers for her work on free speech and was recognized for my work on #BBC100 women of 2014. I am also on the... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Nest

4:00pm

Big Brother and its Corporate Twin
New technologies had great potential for the developing world. However, the problem lies with systematic failure to critically contemplate the potential ill effects of deploying technologies in development and humanitarian initiatives and in turn to consider the legal and safeguards required in order to ensure the rights of individuals living in the developing world. Present Management Information System are gathering and storing extensive amounts of personal data in what are often insecure or high­risk environment for human rights defenders. Most of developing countries including India, Pakistan, Malaysia where government often used to manage information of citizens to provide developmental schemes or administer those schemes. On another hand, Facebook’s real name registration system is dictating people how to register their accounts and set­up their user profiles. The potential use of mobile phones in developing countries to collect or generate data, and the subsequent analysis of such data, has the potential to assist in development and humanitarian initiatives in multiple ways. But in an age of widespread communications surveillance by both State and non­State actors, using mobile networks to transmit sensitive data is inherently risky.

Speakers
avatar for Asad Baig

Asad Baig

Executive Director, Media Matters for Democracy
A broadcast journalist by training and an information technologist by education. My work focuses on advocacy around freedom of expression and religious expression, media, and media safety. I have a keen interest in ICT and technology for journalism and development. | | MMfD in Pakistan works on advocacy around freedom of expression online and offline, developing ICT technologies for media and journalism, and campaigning around gender... Read More →
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Researcher, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD, is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School, Rio de Janeiro, where he leads the 'Internet Governance @ FGV' project. Luca is also associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. Before joining CTS, Luca worked for the Council of Europe Internet Governance Unit; served as a Network Neutrality Expert for the Council... Read More →
avatar for Ritu Srivastava

Ritu Srivastava

Senior Programme Manager, Digital Empowerment Foundation
I am working with Digital Empowerment Foundation as Senior Programme Manager. Having experience in FoE, open spectrum; and gender and access issues.


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Cottage

4:00pm

Surveillance in post-dictatorship countries of Latin America
Surveillance practices in Latin America are not usually aligned with a human right’s perspective. First, there is not adequate legal or judicial control over them; and second the laws themselves sometimes enable abuses and facilitate mass surveillance without suspicious grounds.

From this perspective, the NGOs Asociación por los Derechos Civiles and Derechos Digitales in partnership with Citizen Lab, have created two reports regarding surveillance practices in Chile and Argentina: two Latin-American countries that have recently surpassed dictatorial regimes. Aditionally, Citizen Lab recently released a study regarding “Packrat: Seven Years of a South American Threat Actor.” Given the history of Chile, Argentina and other many countries in the region undiscriminated and non-regulated surveillance can mount to the creation of a chilling effect when used against activists and political dissidents, along with many other human rights abuses. At the same time, the learnings of the recent history can eventually show a path to follow in terms of having a more transparent and democratic regulation of intelligence agencies and surveillance practices.

This panel aims to have a conversation on the legal analysis and conclusions found by the organizations, in order to present a concrete point of view regarding surveillance practices that harm and affect freedom of opinion and privacy in the online environment in the region.

Speakers

Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Engine

4:00pm

Untamed Data Mining Activities in Africa and Its Implication for Digital Rights of Citizens
The session will focus on the embrace of biometric data capturing technology in African countries, premised on the need to curb crime and address emerging terrorism challenge across many African States. However, corruption has encouraged proliferation of these processes with Government contractors selling same technology to serve same purpose for different government agencies. The bigger problem is the disregard for rights to privacy of citizens in all of the data mining activities.
This event is targeted at Civil Society, Internet Freedom Advocates, Human Rights Activists, Communications and Data Regulatory Agencies. The session will examine what is happening in various African countries. The goal is to agree on strategies that can may applied in defending Citizen’s right to privacy in the wake of abuse and identified issues around Data Mining activities in Africa. This will form part of the general Digital rights advocacy on the continent and will prepare relevant organization for a robust response to government initiated data mining activities and abuse of such data. We also hope that the session will create a platform of engagement for African advocates even beyond the RightsCon event. Also we will love to see the Roundtable take place in front of an audience.


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Fishbowl

4:00pm

Trainer Fest: Workshops
"Helping the Participants Read their Risks: Taking a Digital Literacy Approach to Digital Security Trainings"
ID: 239/275 — TBA (CommunityRED), TBA (Open Technology Institute)

"Organizational security: Moving communications from individual privacy to collective safety"
ID: 163 — Shauna Dillavou (CommunityRED, Jon Stribling-Uss (Constitutional Communications), Alix Dunn (the engine room), Michael Carbone (Access Now)

Speakers
avatar for Alix Dunn

Alix Dunn

Executive Director, The Engine Room
the engine room
JS

Jon Stribling-Uss

Constitutional Communications


Thursday March 31, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Demo Room

5:15pm

Challenges to Strong Digital Rights Protections: Hub Table Sessions
"Shaping Digital Rights Policy for Next Decade -- Engaging with the 2016 OECD Ministerial Meeting on Digital Economy"
ID: 61
Meet some of the members of the civil society advisory body to the OECD (CSISAC, Civil Society Information Society Advisory Council) and design civil society's advocacy strategy to meaningfully engage with the 2016 OECD Ministerial Meeting on Digital Economy. The OECD Ministerial meeting is a rare opportunity for nongovernment parties to participate in the exclusive decision-making process of the OECD. The next Ministerial meeting will be held in June 2016, Cancun, Mexico, where ministers of OECD member countries and stakeholders meet and discuss the goals and action items of ICT policy for the next decade. The outcomes of the 2016 Ministerial meeting will directly shape ICT policy development in major developed countries during the next decade. Recognizing the timeliness and strategic importance of the 2016 Ministerial meeting, this workshop aims at raise awareness on the issues being discussed in the preparations for the Ministerial and discuss civil society advocacy strategies with the audience. The first half of the Workshop will be led by a moderator and panelists who have been engaging with international organizations including the OECD. The second half of the Workshop will be a strategy session. Panelists will discuss with the audience and design civil society engagement strategies throughout the three day OECD 2016 Ministerial meeting.

"The hyperlink is at risk"
ID: 252 — Laura Tribe (Digital Rights Specialist, OpenMedia)
Rapidly­ changing digital policies across the world are contributing to the decline of the democratizing power of the hyperlink and its ability to create the interconnected information space imagined by Tim Berners-­Lee. One such example is the ancillary copyright law implemented in Spain in 2014–a proposal that was rejected by EuroParl for EU­-wide implementation, but threatens to return with the drafting of updates to the Copyright Directive. To fight back against these policies, an international network of over 90 digital rights organizations, businesses, journalists and Internet users from 30 countries have convened under the banner of “SaveTheLink” to catalogue and push back against sustained threats to the hyperlink. In this session, participants will learn about new policies that make it easier for governments and corporations to demand and implement link censorship, and tools we are developing that will help identify and address these threats. By the end of the session, each participant will understand global threats to the right to link, and have access to educational resources and an action platform to defend the open web. The hyperlink facilitates the distributed power of the Web: but this essential tool is at risk. “Every day” Internet users and those who advocate on their behalf ­must be able to communicate how policies and practices will affect they way that we access knowledge and culture online. After this session, participants will be able to speak to the issue of link censorship in ways that are real and tangible to Internet users, and identify some of the leading threats to our right to link.

"Safeguarding freedom expression and privacy online: staying safe but remaining vocal"
ID: 74 —  Kathleen Reen (Vice President for ICT Policy and Programs, Internews), Farieha Aziz (Director, Bolo Bhi)
Online harassment and terrorist content are becoming a rallying point for governments to step into this space and take control. Whether it results in targeting encryption users, increasing content takedown, or user data requests, the overbearing presence governments around the world and bent towards control and overregulation is becoming problematic for netizens freedom of expression and privacy. How freedom expression and privacy online are perceived also requires a fundamental rethink. Privacy and freedom expression are traditionally treated as separate issues yet one has a direct impact on the other. The two need to be viewed in connection to one another. This session seeks to hold a dialogue between local civil society organizations and the private sector i.e. internet companies that operate in their countries to discuss the challenges faced vis a vis freedom of expression and privacy online. The dialogue will explore how companies and civil society organizations collaborate and communicate better to safeguard expression and ensure safety online, to protect human rights and develop new strategies for overcoming them.

"Binary Choice or Balancing Test: The fundamental challenge of the encryption debate"
ID: 255 — Daniel Weitzner
The debate on encryption has been continuing over decades and despite global discussions on use of strong encryption we have witnessed anti encryption regulation as recent as 2015 such as the Snooper’s Charter in the United Kingdom and the National Encryption Policy in India in the name of national security and public order. The UN Special Rapporteur's Report on encryption, anonymity, and the human rights framework has acknowledged the need to uphold the principles of necessity, proportionality and legitimacy in regulating encryption. However, the crypto community doesn’t see things along the lines of those tests, but in more black and white terms: demanding no regulation of encryption whatsoever. Through this session, analyse if we aim to see if these two visions – of the law and of technology – are fundamentally incompatible or whether they can be reconciled.

"IranCubator: Sparking Iran’s Civic-Tech Sector"
ID: 218

Speakers
avatar for Firuzeh Mahmoudi

Firuzeh Mahmoudi

United for Iran, United for Iran
Firuzeh Mahmoudi is the Director of United for Iran, a Bay Area NGO working to improve civil liberties in Iran. After witnessing the 2009 uprising in Iran, Mahmoudi organized a global rally in 110 cities. The day turned to be the largest day of global support for Iran in history. Shortly after, Mahmoudi started United for Iran. Seven years later, United for Iran works to improve human rights, support civil society, and increases civic... Read More →
KR

Kathleen Reen

Vice President for ICT Policy and Programs, Internews
avatar for Laura Tribe

Laura Tribe

Digital Rights Specialist, OpenMedia


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
*The Hub*

5:15pm

Protest, Privacy, and the Private sector
In August 2015, days ahead of a major rally, the Malaysian regulatory body on communications and multimedia, the MCMC, issued a request for Internet Service Providers in the country to block access to the website of the Malaysian electoral reform group, Bersih, stating that it was necessary to block information deemed threatening to national security.

The impact of this block was minimal, however, because the majority of Bersih rally participants used Facebook and Twitter to share information.

Private companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google have designed online spaces that are increasingly becoming sites of dispute and negotiation of rights among a diverse network of stakeholders. What responsibility do these global corporations have to protect user rights to peacefully assembly and association online, when those rights are being restricted by national laws?

Acts of peaceful assembly online are increasingly taking place on platforms that appear public, but are owned and operated for profit. While global corporations may not be subject to the same level of restrictions experienced by local companies, they are subject to rules of intellectual property, data retention and sharing, disclosure to state enforcement agencies, and intermediary liability.

As we discover new ways to exercise our rights to peaceful assembly and association online, individuals are increasingly subject to surveillance, censorship, threats of violence, and direct attack. This workshop will discuss emerging challenges to freedom of assembly and association online, exploring trends and recommendations. This session will also consider strategies and best practices to create and maintain safe spaces for networking and engagement online.

This session will bring together human rights defenders and researchers from Asia, together with representatives from the private sector for a dynamic discussion with the following expected outcomes:

Shared understanding of the right of peaceful assembly and association, and how it operates in different online and offline contexts

Develop an understanding of some of the opportunities and challenges for the private sector to respect, protect, and promote the right to peaceful assembly and association online.

Reflections on existing and potential protection mechanisms, developed together by civil society groups and private companies.

Recommendations on how to best utilize existing opportunities to provide a more conducive environment to exercise the right to peaceful assembly and association online.

Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to continue discussion of protection mechanisms for the right to peaceful assembly and association online, focusing specifically on the role of private companies.

Researchers will use the outcomes of this workshop to build awareness and advocacy campaigns at the national, regional and global level.

Speakers
avatar for Haroon Baloch

Haroon Baloch

Bytes for All
avatar for Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Association for Progressive Communications
avatar for Serene Lim

Serene Lim

Coordinator, EMPOWER
avatar for Ritu Srivastava

Ritu Srivastava

Senior Programme Manager, Digital Empowerment Foundation
I am working with Digital Empowerment Foundation as Senior Programme Manager. Having experience in FoE, open spectrum; and gender and access issues.


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Fishbowl

5:15pm

Terrorism, Extremism and Excuses: Getting to Solutions in the ISIS vs Censorship Debate
The Internet, particularly social media platforms, is the public sphere of the 21st century. Yet the majority of these public spaces are governed by private companies, and ISIS has been using these spaces for recruitment and dissemination of their ideology. "Countering violent extremism” (CVE) marks the latest iteration of the War on Terror and in the last year have become a defining priority of not only national governments but also international and regional bodies. The impacts of the CVE agenda, however, are much broader than just ISIS and at times directly challenge democratic processes and human rights online, as companies censor and remove extremist and hateful content, explore altering search results to display counternarratives, and monitor their users's speech, often at the urging of governments and with little to no transparency or due process—or recognition that counterspeech, which requires free expression, may be the best strategy for combatting violent speech overall. In this workshop, we will bring free expression advocates and others into the CVE dialogue with tech companies and government representatives to discuss how the fight against ISIS can be fought online without setting dangerous precedents. We aim to generate innovative, actionable, contextually appropriate ideas to combat violent extremist speech online that still uphold international free speech and privacy norms. This is particularly important in light of specific processes underway at the UN, OSCE, EU, GNI and the US to combat CVE, including online. Recommendations and ideas generated could be fed into these processes, in which CPJ, SMEX, and others are involved.

This session is hosted by SMEX and CPJ.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Dheere

Jessica Dheere

Founder/Director, Social Media Exchange
I'm the co-founder and executive director of Social Media Exchange (smex.org), a Beirut–based NGO that since 2008 has been a pioneer in digital journalism, digital advocacy, and digital rights in Lebanon and the Arab region.
avatar for Courtney Radsch

Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch, USA, is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism and Citizen Journalism in Egypt: Digital Dissidence and Political Change. She has led advocacy missions to more than a dozen countries, U.N. bodies, and the... Read More →



Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Slate

5:15pm

Multistakeholder Approaches to Fostering Global Connectivity
At the end of 2015, the WSIS+10 Review emphasized the need for cross-sector solutions to foster global connectivity and sustainable information societies. Even as more and more people come online around the world, there are 4.5B people who aren’t connected at all. It has become clear that meeting this challenge requires partnerships between and across various sectors of society, including industry, government, civil society, academia, and the technical community.

This panel will bring together key stakeholders from various sectors to identify multistakeholder strategies for fostering global connectivity. Special attention will be paid to how improved data on the state of global Internet access and connectivity can help bridge global digital divides as well as incorporate better data and evidence into Internet policy making.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Rose

Karen Rose

Internet Society
Karen has been active across Internet technology, policy, and development for nearly 20 years, including prior roles in Internet start-ups, government, and management consulting. She began her career in public policy working on Internet and e-commerce issues at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. She later joined the National Telecommunications and Information Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce where her work focused on the... Read More →
DT

Dhanaraj Thakur

Research Manager, Alliance for Affordable Internet


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Bridge

5:15pm

Fostering a Culture of Digital Rights: Lightning Talks
"Designing Consent Into Social Networks"
ID: 23 — Caroline Sinders (Interaction Designer, IBM)
Online harassment isn’t a new plight or issue within social media, but what is new is the study and focus on online harassment. New verbiage, vocabulary, and offline initiatives have been created to focus on and provide support for online harassment victims. But what can be used to stymie harassment in digital spaces? Is harassment facilitated, not because of language, but because of the infrastructural design of a system? Can systems design and UI design encourage and dissuade specific social interactions in digital spaces? How does design affect users within the system? Within this lecture, I plan to break down the way computers are beginning to understand digital language, through machine learning, and then dissect the way infrastructure is affecting and shaping social interactions, social communication, and language.

"Hacking Politics"

ID: 25 — Santiago Siri (President, Democracy Earth)
This talk will cover how we started a political party in Argentina with the goal to 'change the system from within' and we faced a corrupt machinery. Today, we're building open source software to make voting more transparent and accountable anywhere in the world with the support of Y Combinator.

"Building an inclusive community: Code of Conduct principles and best practices"
ID: 243 - Gemma Barrett (Ford-Mozilla Open Web Fellow, Open Technology Institute)
"The use of anti-harassment policies in tech communities has been a contentious issue for the last few years, despite being a standard part of other industries and high-profile implementations (such as Apple's usage of the Contributor Covenant in their Swift repository) becoming a more regular occurrence. With such an issue, it's perhaps not surprising that an overwhelming number of resources have sprung up to provide opinions on, samples of, and supporting processes for, their usage. But a lack of guiding principles and standards has resulted in varying levels of quality implementation and community leader support.
This session will look at the task of building an inclusive community through Code of Conduct implementation in the same manner as a software development project. Problems with current implementations will be identified, edge cases will be considered and solutions will be drawn up, with the end goal of the talk being to examine the core values required by each implementation in order for it to successfully build an inclusive environment."


"How One Law Turned Every Peruvian into a Target of Surveillance?"
ID: 131 — Miguel Morachimo (Executive Director, Hiperderecho)
This presentation tells the experience of the Stalker Law in Peru, which gives police access to geolocation data without judicial authorization and imposes mandatory data retention for three years. This law was approved without prior debate, with very little justification, parts of it were plagiarized from the Internet and currently is being challenged in Congress. From this example, the idea is to expand on a wider conversation about surveillance, national security and policy populism in developing countries. 

"How Assange Won in the UN and What It Means"
Carey Shenkman (First Amendment and Human Rights Lawyer)
Last month WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange won a 1.5 year-long case against Sweden and the United Kingdom before the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD), a decision hailed by hundreds of figures, including rights organizations, academics, and Nobel laureates. The WGAD found Assange's situation in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London —nearly four years — to be detention based on a well-founded fear of persecution by the United States. An unprecedented US investigation continues against Assange for journalistic activities. Important freedom of expression implications arise from the opinion and the WGAD's follow-up statements. The talk will touch upon what the WGAD's decision means more broadly, and how it represents a growing European and international trend toward protecting whistleblowers and those who promote truth-telling.

Speakers
GB

Gemma Barrett

Ford-Mozilla Open Web Fellow, Open Technology Institute
avatar for Miguel Morachimo

Miguel Morachimo

Director, Hiperderecho
Miguel Morachimo is a lawyer from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and the director of the nonprofit Hiperderecho, a Peruvian civil organization devoted to facilitating public understanding, research, promotion, and observance of human rights and freedoms in the digital world. His work has been featured in all major news outlets in Peru and he has participated in congressional hearings and several major international conferences. His... Read More →
avatar for Carey Shenkman

Carey Shenkman

First Amendment and Human Rights Lawyer
Carey Shenkman is an attorney specializing in human rights and the First Amendment. He currently works for Michael Ratner, President Emeritus ofthe Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR), and consults for ARTICLE 19. Previously, he worked on litigation with CCR on behalf of journalists seeking public access to the court-martial of Chelsea Manning, on human rights litigation before the US Supreme Court, and at the Yugoslav International Tribunal... Read More →
avatar for Caroline Sinders

Caroline Sinders

User Researcher, IBM Watson
Interaction Designer, IBM
SS

Santiago Siri

President, Democracy Earth


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Fireside

5:15pm

How California Is Fighting Back Against Cybersurveillance'.
This panel discussion will feature three Bay Area­-based activists and one Bay Area policy maker who have been leaders in creating and implementing strategies to intervene on digital security and surveillance issues locally, including municipal, county, and state­wide work. Underlying their collaborations have been three basic frames about the surveillance state and its impact on Californians at the intersection of the Internet and human rights: a) threats to privacy and constitutional abuses (Oakland Privacy), b) threats to freedom of expression and the right of dissent (Media Alliance) and c) safety from profiling and on­line hate (CAIR). After exploring these dimensions of the problem, the panel will outline local successes and future challenges to come.

The session will focus on pathways to participation in California activism along the issue frames and methodologies that most appeal to individual participants and on models for policy, legislation and grassroots organizing that can be transported back from the conference to home states and countries and modified to meet local conditions.

This panel is envisioned as a conference session with brief presentations by the three panelists and then a robust question and answer discussion period with the audience. The panel will be moderated by Bay Area Restore The Fourth coordinator Zaki Manian.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Hofer

Brian Hofer

Oakland Privacy Working Group
Member, Oakland Privacy Working Group. Chair, Oakland Ad Hoc Privacy Committee. Panelist at California DOJ "Protecting Our Communities, Respecting Our Liberties"; Berkeley Law School "Body Cameras & Police Accountability"; Library Freedom Project "Street-level surveillance and how it threatens our communities".


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Lab

5:15pm

Never underestimate domain names policies
While everyone in Internet Governance space probably may heard about the IANA stewardship transition and ICANN reform, we are definitely not going to talk about that . What matters is the policies made within and by ICANN.

ICANN is an hybrid organisation of business and regulator nature creating policy with global overreach for DNS. It enforces its policies through contracts with domain names registries and registrars, or what can be described as term of services having little protection for the registrant.

For years, governments, law enforcement, intellectual property and business interests have been pressing and attempting to get ICANN going beyond its limited mission. They are still lobbying to create policies impacting registrants and users without real safeguards and in several occasion in contradiction with laws:
* Collecting and accessing to registration data (or the so-­called whois) linked to domain weakening users privacy.
* Abusing the arbitration process such UDRP threatening freedom of expression, or hijacking the contractual compliance to go into copyright and content issue
* Using DNS to impose content policy via the new generic names launched lately arguing safety, morality and public interest.

The panel is aimed to describe this in more details and with concrete cases happened in the last years , and to explore how civil society, activists and digital defenders can respond to that effectively. We need to prevent that domain name become a weak point and a risk for the privacy and rights of activists, also to learn from other experiences.

Suggested Readings:
  • https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/10/domain-registrars-have-ask-icanns-permission-comply-laws-protecting-your-privacy
  • https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/06/changes-domain-name-rules-place-user-privacy-jeopardy
  • https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/09/eff-icann-privacy-must-be-purposeful-not-afterthought
  • http://www.apc.org/en/news/%E2%80%9Cwe-need-avoid-situation-where-dns-used-police-con
  • http://www.wired.com/2015/07/unassuming-web-proposal-make-harassment-easier/

The session is supported by the Non-Commercial Users Constituency ncuc.org & @ncuc

Speakers
avatar for Rafik Dammak

Rafik Dammak

Non-commercial Stakeholder Group former Chair, NTT
He is engineer working and living in Japan. He is member of the steering committee for the Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles . He has been involved in ICANN community as NCUC (Non-commercial users constituency) individual user member, former elected GNSO Councillor for the Non-Commercial Stakeholder Group, ICANN nomcom member in addition to his participation in several ICANN WGs like the new gTLD applicant support where he was... Read More →
avatar for Robin Gross

Robin Gross

Executive Director, IP Justice
avatar for Mitch Stoltz

Mitch Stoltz

Senior Staff Attorney, Electronic Frontier Foundation
I fight threats to free speech from the abuse of IP laws.


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Engine

5:15pm

Trends to Watch In Global Surveillance
As communication surveillance laws around the globe come under scrutiny,
what emerging trends can we identify? Access, EFF, and Fundación Acceso
will answer that question on this panel comparing legal research and
survey results on the best and worst practices in surveillance law and
policy in countries around the world. After providing that context, the
panel will make recommendations based on the International Principles on
the Application of Human Rights to Communication Surveillance, its legal
analysis, and implementation guide. The panelists will also discuss
methodologies and identify gaps in research that other organizations
could contribute to completing.

Speakers
avatar for Dennys Antonialli

Dennys Antonialli

Executive Director, InternetLab
PhD candidate in Constitutional Law at the University of São Paulo (Brazil), where he also earned his bachelor of laws degree (LL.B., 2008). He holds a “Master of the Science of Law” degree from Stanford Law School (J.S.M., 2011) and a “Master of Law and Business” from Bucerius Law School/WHU Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany (MLB, 2010). Dennys has worked in the technology and civil liberties team of the Policy Department of... Read More →


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Cottage

5:15pm

Understanding Effective Cybersecurity Capacity Building
The purpose of the session is to provide an overview of cybersecurity capacity building based on five dimensions, defined by the Global Cybersecurity Capacity Centre in the Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (CMM).

The following discussion will
- address the current landscape and developments in cybersecurity capacity building at national, regional and international level;
- identify the challenges for various stakeholder groups, and the existing opportunities to get engaged in cybersecurity capacity building;
- flag effective approaches to cybersecurity capacity building.

The aim of the session is a) to enable stakeholders to understand the scope of cybersecurity capacity building, b) to help them to identify areas for manoeuvre in their thematic area, and c) to foster their ability to contribute effectively to in the dimensions of cybersecurity capacity building in their respective region.

The intended outcomes of the sessions are
- Raise participant awareness of the global landscape of cybersecurity capacity building.
- Based on the dimensions defined by the Centre, participants understand the scope of cybersecurity capacity building.
- Participants recognise the need for international cooperation and strategic thinking in cybersecurity capacity building.

Speakers
avatar for Chinmayi Arun

Chinmayi Arun

Executive Director, Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi
CB

Cathleen Berger

Cyber Capacity Building Lead, Global Partner Digital


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Nest

5:15pm

Trainer Fest: Sourcing Threat Intelligence
"Sourcing Threat Intelligence"

ID: 161 — Seamus Tuohy (Senior Technologist and Risk Advisor, Internews)

What existing threat intelligence information sources exist for tracking freedom of expression issues and digital security incidents around the world? Of those, which ones are timely; which ones are accurate? During this workshop we will come together and share the groups and resources that we rely on to source accurate and timely. in order for human rights defenders and advocates to maintain their agility they need access to the wealth of data, analysis, and intelligence that is created throughout our community. But, much of this knowledge is trapped in a opaque collection of websites, reports, mailing lists, and wikis that are rarely shared widely enough to ensure that they can be found when needed.

If you have organizations, mailing lists, websites, wikis, news feeds, data sets, etc. that you use to get up to date information or analysis about human rights & Internet freedom issues and incidents you can submit a resource. You can also view the raw results.

The survey for participants can be found HERE
The participant spreadsheet can be found HERE

Speakers
avatar for Seamus Tuohy

Seamus Tuohy

Senior Technologist, Internews
Senior Technologist and Risk Advisor, Internews


Thursday March 31, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
The Demo Room
 
Friday, April 1
 

9:00am

Trolls, Threats and Online Free Speech
This session will examine the dilemmas posed when unfettered speech online and on social media has the effect of deterring counterspeech. The Gamergate controversy is perhaps the most visible manifestation of this pernicious phenomenon, where online discussions of sexism in the video game industry provoked vitriol and direct personal threats to the point where speakers were not only driven offline, but forced to cancel speeches and flee from their homes. Other examples are manifest in debates playing out on college campuses, as well as in exchanges between political activists and anonymous speakers online. 

While the chilling of speech with anticipated counterspeech is not new, the speed, ferocity, reach, and permanence of online vitriol have taken the problem to a new level, posing a formidable constraint on speech and narrowing some online discourse to closed communities or widely accepted points of view. At the same time, attempts to address the problem can themselves impose significant constraints on speech. This new threat to free speech poses formidable challenges for traditional free speech advocates, internet and social media platforms and law enforcement, all of whom must balance competing interests in the protection of speech. There are no simple answers, and yet failure to address the problems more systematically could lead whole populations and viewpoints to retreat from participation in the modern, online public square.

This session will examine key examples of this phenomenon and explore approaches to handling it that do not interfere with speech, including more robust prosecution of threats, methods for flagging and exposing trolls, and collective strategies to assert and hold the space for speech. It will examine the obligations of users, platforms, law enforcement and advocates.

Speakers
avatar for Elisa D'Amico

Elisa D'Amico

Attorney & Project Co-Founder, K&L Gates Cyber Civil Rights Legal Project
Elisa D'Amico is a partner with K&L Gates LLP and co-founder of the Cyber Civil Rights Legal Project, a nationally and internationally recognized project that provides pro bono legal assistance to victims of sexual cyberharassment. New York Times has highlighted the Cyber Civil Rights Legal Project as “the first of its kind at a major United States law firm.” The project has helped individuals living in the U.S., Canada, Europe... Read More →
avatar for Mary Anne Franks

Mary Anne Franks

Professor, University of Miami School of Law
Dr. Mary Anne Franks is a Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law, where she teaches criminal law, criminal procedure, First Amendment law, family law, and Law, Policy, and Technology. Before joining the UM faculty, Dr. Franks was a Bigelow Fellow and Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago School of Law and a Lecturer in Social Studies at Harvard University. Dr. Franks received her J.D. in 2007 from Harvard Law School... Read More →
avatar for Peter Stern

Peter Stern

Policy Manager, Facebook
Peter Stern is a Manager in the Product Policy group at Facebook in Menlo Park, California. Product Policy is responsible for writing and interpreting global policies governing what users can share on Facebook, and how advertisers and developers interact with the site. Peter leads a risk management team that seeks to ensure Facebook has the proper policies and enforcement practices in place, and is aligned with key external stakeholders such as... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Lab

9:00am

Protecting User Rights Online: Practical Issues Facing Early-Stage Technology Companies
The goal of this panel is to present the final version of a guide to help early-stage companies navigate the maze of laws governing online service with an eye to helping these companies protect the right to privacy, freedom of expression, data security and intellectual property. The hope is to foster discussion on issues that have arisen over the past few years, including government takedown request of content in light of terrorist recruitment online, and other similar issues facing online companies today. Come join a disucssion on how the landscape has changed since 2014, and what companies need to do to address these issue.

An important component of the panel will be a question and answer session where early-stage companies can obtain advice on particular challenges facing them.

Speakers
avatar for Nnamdi Okike

Nnamdi Okike

Founder and Managing Partner, 645 Ventures
Nnamdi Okike is a technology investor with extensive experience investing in Internet and software companies. Nnamdi has made over thirty investments over his career, several of which have resulted in successful exits. His historical investments include Folhamatic (acquired by Sage for $300 million), Hitwise (acquired by Experian for $240 million), Astaro (acquired by Sophos), DivX Networks (IPO), Kabum, Bionexo, Photobox and Mimecast. Nnamdi is... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Fishbowl

9:00am

Ranking ICT companies on digital rights: A 'how to' guide
A growing number of organizations are benchmarking ICT companies on various dimensions of digital rights, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation (USA), Telecom Transparency Project (Canada), IXMaps (Canada), Fundación Karisma (Colombia), Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales (Mexico), Hiperderecho (Peru), and Ranking Digital Rights (global). Additional groups have expressed interest in launching such projects but are not sure where to start. This hands-on session will help participants develop their project idea by discussing scope (which companies? which rights? which business practices?), business models (including potential funding sources), and the research process (what criteria? who should conduct the research? what workflows?).

Since launching the Ranking Digital Rights Corporate Accountability Index in November 2015, RDR has consistently received feedback that ranking 16 companies is a good start, but it is not enough. We agree completely, and believe that for a variety of reasons (notably local expertise, legitimacy and outreach potential) it would be ideal for organizations focused on digital rights in a given country to take the lead on holding the companies operating in that country to account. At the same time we recognize that there is a steep learning curve to this work, and want to share our experience developing the Index and its criteria with colleagues around the world.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

International Rights Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Katitza Rodriguez is EFF's International Rights Director. She concentrates on comparative policy of international privacy issues, with special emphasis on law enforcement, government surveillance, and cross border data flows. Her work in EFF's International Program also focuses on cybersecurity at the intersection of privacy, freedom of expression, and copyright enforcement.


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Slate

9:00am

Accelerating Women’s Digital Inclusion
Join us for an action-oriented conversation with corporate, NGO, and grassroots experts on how women’s digital inclusion can be accelerated and prioritized to digitally empower women around the world.

This panel will hear testimonies of the realities that women face to use digital communications technologies, including recommendations from women in 70 countries on how to improve digital access and inclusion for women globally. Panelists from the corporate, NGO, and grassroots sectors will highlight creative solutions to support grassroots women to overcome the barriers they face, as well as sharing ways that technology companies and mobile providers can translate recommendations into actionable plans and policies to speed up universal access to digital spaces for women and girls.

Speakers
avatar for Jensine Larsen

Jensine Larsen

CEO, World Pulse
Jensine (Yen-See-Nah) Larsen, an award-winning social media entrepreneur and international journalist, is the founder of World Pulse, a digital media network connecting women worldwide and bringing them a global voice. Today World Pulse is powered by 60,000 women from 190 countries who are collectively improving the lives of 2.2 million people. Jensine has also pioneered World Pulse magazine, grassroots women’s citizen journalism training, and... Read More →
avatar for Aditi Mohapatra

Aditi Mohapatra

Director, BSR
MR

Melissa Romaine

Program Manager, Advocacy, Mozilla Foundation


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Cottage

9:00am

Emergency session: Digital rights in danger in Brazil
Brazil's progressive take on digital rights is well known all over the world. In 2014, during the Net Mundial Conference for the future of the internet, the Brazilian Civil Framework for the Internet (Marco Civil) was introduced to the public as a piece of legislation that offered guarantees for the rights to privacy and freedom of expression of internet users in the country. 

Yesterday, a Bicameral Commission in the Brazilian Congress proposed a set of 8 new bills that would seriously undermine the rights of Brazilian internet users and harm the rights guaranteed in current legislation. Join Brazilian activists to talk about next steps to help fight back this serious threat.

Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Bridge

9:00am

Does Free Data Make the World Go Round? // Next steps for Equal­Rating
Connected the unconnected remains one of the great challenges of our time, even as regulatory attention grows around the world, and important work is developing, including an increasing number of new market solutions to connect all people to all parts of the Internet. This session will begin by examining the barriers to access, in an effort to increase the audience’s understanding of the problem space at the nexus of Internet access and openness. Building on that, in the second half of this discussion, we’ll explore some of the solutions that have been put forward, as well as identify what parts of the problem/solution space remain unaddressed. The intention is that in better understanding the challenges to sustainable access models as well as the landscape of current efforts, the audience will be more informed after RightsCon to pursue solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa

co-Founder, SaveTheInternet.in
Founder and Editor - MediaNama.com; co-founder SavetheInternet.in/Internet Freedom Foundation


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Engine

9:00am

Fireside Chat: Ron Deibert, Edward Snowden, Amie Stepanovich
We are witnessing a global arms race on surveillance. Intelligence arms of governments are
developing or buying technologies capable of tracking internet traffic, intercepting sensitive
communications, and hacking into personal devices. In some countries this is done in line with
statutory frameworks, which are often applied using secret interpretations, whereas other
governments take advantage of the lack of framework to abuse personal rights and liberties at
will. For users at risk, preserving privacy requires constant diligence, and in some cases it is
quite frequently a matter of life and death. Join Edward Snowden, a member of the Board of
Directors at the Freedom of the Press Foundation, and Ron Deibert, Director of the Citizen Lab
at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs, in a fireside chat, moderated by
Access Now’s Amie Stepanovich. The conversation will consider the formal and informal
government surveillance powers and authorities, including the need for transparency and the
opportunities for reform.

Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
*The Hub*

9:00am

You Do You: Talks and Demos on Freedom of Expression from Across the Globe
"Words Are Powerful: How can mainstream media implement ethical journalism and gender-sensitive reporting"
ID: 98 — Japleen Pasricha (Founder & Editor-in-chief, FeminismInIndia.com)
Words are powerful, and how mainstream media talks, writes, represents and reports on gender and gender-based violence makes a huge impact on how people perceive it. This short presentation shows how Indian as well as international media has misrepresented and misreported gender and gender based violence. A special focus is on social media and platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and how they silence the voices of women and sexual minorities and the rise of Islamophobia in the global North and how media helps in promoting the same. At the end of the presentation, a set of recommendations and best practices are presented on how media can improve reportage on gender and gender¬based violence and implement ethical journalism. 

"Learning Free Speech Basics in India"
ID: 292 —  Japreet Grewal (The Centre for Intenet and Society)
The Centre for Internet and Society (CIS) has created a portal dedicated to spreading awareness for freedom of expression online in India. CIS proposes to organise a session to launch the portal at the Rights Con and have a conversation about the objective behind this initiative. Through this initiative, CIS intends to educate online users about the law on freedom of expression in India and various medium specific mechanisms such as internet blocking which stifle this freedom. The portal provides simplified understanding of complex legal issues related to online speech that affect everyday lives of say, an online blogger, a journalist, researcher in India. We propose to have at this session, an audience of prospective viewers of our portal including journalists, researchers, start-ups and other similar local as well as global initiatives to talk about how this initiative can address some of the queries on free speech that online users have and look for opportunities to collaborate with other initiatives to make it more effective.

"Da Se Zna: Documenting and Publicizing LGBTI Rights Abuses in Serbia"
ID: 298 —  Collin Sullivan (Benetech)
This session will present the recently published web portal, Da Se Zna (“For the Record"), which serves as a place where the public can both submit new testimony of human rights abuse against the LGBTI population in Serbia, and view information about documented incidents of abuse. It is the product of a partnership between NDI and Benetech which emphasized security and privacy preservation in data collection and storage, and usability in publicly accessing and interpreting the information. 

"Iran's Cyber Army and Freedom of Expression Online"
ID: 5 — Baaroo Foundation
In recent years Iranian officials time after time have boasted about the actions of “Iran's Cyber Army” and their fight in the "soft-war” online. But there are limited facts known about their memberships, structure, or even place within Iranian security forces. In this session we will breakdown and discuss our latest findings and research into elusive this Iranian Cyber Army. In the coming weeks ARTICLE 19 will publish a report about the effects of the “Iranian Cyber Army” on Freedom of Expression Online, the safety of Iranian activists, and online self-censorship.


"AntHillHacks — a collective visual narrative"
ID: 115 — Servelots Infotech

"Bridge: Translate the global web and social media"
ID: 68 — An Xiao Mina (Director of Product, Meedan), Chris Blow (Director of User Experience, Meedan)
Bridge is Meedan's platform for human powered translations of social media. It has already been used by nearly 40 translators to generated hundreds of translations of social media around under-reported stories from Egypt, Lebanon, Iran and Hong Kong. With a swift workflow, translators can surface and translate compelling content within 5 minutes, making Bridge an ideal tool for real-time social media research and mobilizations. In this demo, we will look at the software (both an iOS app and a browser extension) and how teams can use it to surface and broadcast content from one language to another. Our goal is to build a more crosslingual, crosscultural internet and find partners who care about these issues. We hope to find new partners to work with--either as users of Bridge or as supporters. 

Speakers
avatar for Chris Blow

Chris Blow

Designer, Meedan
Director of User Experience, Meeda
JG

Japreet Grewal

The Centre for Intenet and Society
avatar for An Xiao Mina

An Xiao Mina

Director of Product, Meedan
An “An Xiao” Mina is a technologist, writer and artist. She leads the product team at Meedan, where they build tools for global journalism and translation. She was recently a 2016 Visiting Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow and a 2013 USC Getty Arts Journalism Fellow.An “An Xiao” Mina is a technologist, writer and artist. She leads the product team at Meedan, where they build tools for global journalism and translation. She was... Read More →
avatar for Japleen Pasricha

Japleen Pasricha

Founder- Director, FeminismInIndia.com
avatar for Collin Sullivan

Collin Sullivan

Human Rights Program Associate, Benetech
Benetech


Friday April 1, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
The Demo Room

10:30am

Reserved
TBA

Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Slate

10:30am

Shields up! Protection against online harassment of journalists, bloggers, citizen reporters
Journalists and bloggers are increasingly the victims of online harassment including death threats, verbal abuse and smear campaigns as well as technical attacks involving malware, defacement or other means. The aggressors in these cases share a common goal: to intimidate journalists into silence and therefore put a stop to critical commentary or investigative reporting in the public interest. It is clear that developing an efficient approach to dealing with online harassment against journalists and the resulting fear and self-censorship requires us to face a diverse array of challenges. Therefore, any approach needs to have a multidisciplinary perspective.

Beginning to develop such an approach is the main objective of the session “Shields up! Protection against online harassment”, which will bring to the table journalists, press freedom advocates, Internet intermediaries, media houses, legal experts, technologists and representatives of intergovernmental bodies. It will set the tone for a series of discussions aimed at defining a multidisciplinary approach in the next two years.

Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for Geoffrey King

Geoffrey King

Technology Program Coordinator, Committee to Protect Journalists
Geoffrey King joined CPJ in 2013 to coordinate the organization's Internet and technology policy efforts. Based in San Francisco, he protects the rights of journalists through advocacy, public education, and engagement with policymakers worldwide. | | Prior to joining CPJ, King, an attorney by training, represented U.S.-based individuals in constitutional matters involving the freedoms of speech, press, and petition. He is also a documentary... Read More →
avatar for Javier Luque

Javier Luque

Digital Media Coordinator, International Press Institute


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Lab

10:30am

The Art of Admission: How Mobile Apps Are Documenting Court-Admissible Evidence of Human Rights Violations
"In this session, we will bring together panelists from Physicians for Human Rights’ MediCapt team, the International Bar Association’s eyeWitness team, and the People’s Intelligence, each of whom are in varying stages of developing or rolling out a specialized mobile app aimed at collecting, documenting, and preserving court-admissible evidence of human rights violations. These respective apps are intended to be used globally, especially in resource-constrained, conflict or post-conflict contexts. Some of the apps will require functional authorization and support from the host government to be used for local prosecutions and other apps, by necessity, will need to be used without the knowledge of the local governing authority.

The panelists will each briefly share an overview of their app, and some key challenges they face regarding the feasibility or usability of the app in the field. The objective of the session is for the panelists to identify (i) legal, (ii) technological; and (iii) ethical struggles they are experiencing. Panelists will exchange ideas, share lessons learned and, in collaboration with active participants in the audience, work toward articulating innovative approaches as well as new collaborations and strategies for responding to those challenges. The panelists will launch the discussion, but the substantive session is designed to be very interactive, and will solicit engagement and concrete, solutions-oriented feedback from key participants in the audience, including investigators and trial attorneys from the International Criminal Court and other relevant courts or tribunals, human rights activists, as well as ethicists, technologists, and privacy specialists, and government officials, among others. "

Speakers
WB

Wendy Betts

Project Director, eyeWitness to Atrocity
Wendy Betts is the Project Director for eyeWitness to Atrocities. Ms. Betts has twenty years of | experience in international development, rule of law reform, and transitional justice. She has  | managed projects throughout Eastern Europe as well as in Sierra Leone, Indonesia, and Haiti.  | She previously served as a Senior Program Manager in the International Programs Division of  | the National Center for State Courts and as... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Engine

10:30am

TPP: Is Trade Policy Putting Digital Rights At Risk?
In our actual world, trade negotiations are increasingly setting norms on Internet policy issues. This workshop seeks to explore and discuss some of the most relevant questions regarding this topic.

Are these negotiations reflective of the interests of Internet users as citizens? How do trade agreements impact public policy objectives?

In this aspect, what should trade agreements seek to do in setting global rules and norms to protect an open global Internet and the rights of users, and also promote development?

Some argue there are ways to leverage provisions in trade agreements in support of an open internet and against censorship, filtering, and fragmentation. Is this possible? Can governments implement or promote new models for trade to reflect the interest of Internet users, after signing agreements like TPP?

Lastly, how does the TPP actually affect online rights and freedoms?

Speakers
AC

Anupam Chander

Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law and Director, California International Law Center
avatar for Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic

Legal and Policy Director, Public Citizen
avatar for Pranesh Prakash

Pranesh Prakash

Policy Director, Centre for Internet and Society
Pranesh Prakash is a Policy Director at — and was part of the founding team of — the Centre for Internet and Society, a Bangalore-based non-profit that engages in research and policy advocacy. He is also the Legal Lead at Creative Commons India and an Affiliated Fellow at the Yale Law School's Information Society Project (formerly an A2K Fellow there), and has been on the Executive Committee of the NCUC at ICANN. In 2014 he was selected by... Read More →
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Maira Sutton

Maira Sutton

Global Policy Analyst, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Maira leads international campaigns on copyright, innovation, and access to knowledge issues, including opposing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement. She also tracks how the overreach of copyright can be used to hinder access to knowledge and silence criticism and news online.


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Bridge

10:30am

Straight Talk with Young African Leaders: Net Neutrality & African Innovation
IREX has convened young technology experts and social entrepreneurs from sub-Saharan Africa to debate net neutrality, zero ratings, and African innovation. Panelists include Chenai Chair, from South Africa, who is a leading Policy Researcher on inclusive ICT, Raindolf Owusu from Ghana, a tech entrepreneur who launched Africa's first web browser, Munyaradzi Dodo, who developed Zimbabwe's award-winning video-on-demand and content aggregator, and Sherry Tumusiime, an advertising tech executive in Uganda, who provides technical and software solutions for SME's. Together these leading technology experts will draw upon their collective experience to provide the African perspective on whether or not zero ratings stimulate or stifle innovation on the continent.

Three of the four panelists are 2015 Mandela Washington Fellows, serving on the panel with generous support from USAID. The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders is the flagship program of President Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI). President Obama launched YALI in 2010 to support young African leaders as they spur growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Africa.

The Mandela Washington Fellowship is growing network of 1000 Fellows from 49 sub-Saharan African countries, and the Mandela Washington Fellows participating on the panel will leverage this discussion to foster a larger dialogue around net neutrality with Fellows and partners back home.

Speakers
avatar for chenai chair

chenai chair

Researcher, Research ICT Africa (RIA)
RIA conducts public-interest research on ICT policy and regulation that responds to national, regional and continental needs. We work based on building a repository of African based evidence for policy making. My areas of research include prepaid mobile pricing assessment in 48 African countries; internet governance; and gender and ICT access and use issues. I am currently working on beyond mobile connectivity in South Africa: demand side... Read More →
avatar for Munyaradzi Dodo

Munyaradzi Dodo

CO -FOUNDER, TV YANGU
I am passionate about telling Africa stories on the internet. TV Yangu is the a v Video On Demand platform from Zimbabwe and we are changing the way the world watches African narratives, one story at a time,
RO

Raindolf Owusu

Founder, Oasis WebSoft and Bisa M-Health


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Cottage

10:30am

How to Get Media Attention and Break Through on Your Issue
The fight for digital rights is playing out in policy debates, private sector decisions and within our own communities, and strategically engaging the media is key to connecting to a large audience of people in a way that relates our campaigns to their priorities and values. This session will address how to reach reporters and producers with compelling pitches, visuals and validators, generating a discussion of best practices and lessons learned with concrete examples from recent digital rights campaigns. 

Speakers
avatar for Craig Aaron

Craig Aaron

President & CEO, Free Press
Craig Aaron is the president and CEO of Free Press (www.freepress.net), a national, nonpartisan nonprofit group devoted to changing media and technology policy, promoting the public interest, and strengthening democracy. He speaks across the country on media, Internet and journalism issues. Craig is a frequent guest on TV and talk radio and is quoted often in the national press. His commentaries appear regularly in... Read More →
avatar for Christina DiPasquale

Christina DiPasquale

Founder & CEO, Balestra Media
Christina DiPasquale is the founder and CEO of Balestra Media. She has led communications strategy for campaigns around net neutrality, encryption, municipal broadband and the Oscar-nominated documentary Dirty Wars; actions with members of the StopWatchingUs coalition; rapid response for Chelsea Manning; and stories published by The Intercept. She has works with advocacy groups, filmmakers and whistleblowers... Read More →
avatar for Brian Knappenberger

Brian Knappenberger

Writer/Director, Luminant Media
Brian Knappenberger is an award-winning documentary director, producer, and writer whose credits span film and television. His most recent feature film, The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and is the winner of the Writers Guild Award for Best Screenplay. His other films includeWe Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists, which explores the online activist group Anonymous and... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Fishbowl

10:30am

Criminal (in)justice of vulnerability disclosure
Society is becoming more and more dependent on IT and the availability, integrity and confidentiality of (personal) data. The security of all users of IT, be it businesses, governments, NGO’s, human rights activists and consumers, heavily depends on the underlying security of the hard- and software that is being used.

Unfortunately, software is not perfect, and it probably never will be. Many software products and services these days have security vulnerabilities. Ethical or white hat hackers and security researchers play an important role in discovering and reporting these vulnerabilities as a first step to remedy them. Although reporting vulnerabilities seems straightforward, there are many different and sometimes conflicting interests at stake. For example, there is a tension between the need of the public to know about a vulnerability and the time needed for a vendor or system owner to respond effectively. There is also a tension between helping the system owner and end-users by discovering and demonstrating vulnerabilities with good intentions and crossing the line, resulting in criminal prosecution. Countries all over the world are grappling with these dilemmas, each from the perspective of their own unique cultural background and legal system. To make things more complicated, vulnerability disclosures often affect multiple stakeholders across borders.

In this workshop we would like to interactively explore the different points of view on vulnerability disclosure and cooperation between the hacker community, vendors, system owners, journalists and the national authorities, drawing from our experiences in the Netherlands and abroad. In The Netherlands this has resulted in a Responsible Disclosure policy, supported by the companies, researchers, government and the public prosecutor. By discussing real world examples, including legal verdicts and cases we came across as the national CERT, we hope to further international discussion and mutual understanding for each other’s positions on the subject. Furthermore, we hope to provide attendants of the workshop with ideas and instruments to further the discussion on the subject back at home. Ideally, in the end this could be a first step towards worldwide acknowledged good practices for vulnerability disclosure.

Speakers
NC

Nate Cardozo

Senior Staff Attorney, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Nate Cardozo is a Senior Staff Attorney on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s digital civil liberties team. In addition to his focus on free speech and privacy litigation, Nate works on EFF's cryptography policy and the Coders' Rights Project. Nate has projects involving export controls on software, state-sponsored malware, automotive privacy, government transparency, hardware hacking rights, anonymous speech, electronic privacy law... Read More →
AD

Arjan de Jong

Advisor on Cyber Security - National Cyber Security Centre, Ministry of Security and Justice of the Netherlands
RS

Ross Schulman

Cybersecurity Initiative (New America)


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Nest

10:30am

Migrants, Surveillance and Human Rights

At this session we will look at the issue of surveillance of migrants and refugees as one of the most urging and complex issues emerging in the area of human rights; a balancing act of security and protection. The fast and erratic outpour of migrants, particularly into Europe this last fall, has lead to changes in border control and a call for surveillance of the hundreds of thousands third country nationals. One of the most startling and unanticipated outcomes of the way in which refugees have been moving across the European continent has been new stresses on the Schengen-free travel zones comprised of 26 states, almost entirely made of EU members. 

This session will reflect on the EU responses and compare it with border surveillance measures taking place in other areas of the world such as United States.


Moderators
Speakers
DD

Deniz D. Aydin

Oxford University
DK

Dragana Kaurin

Localization Lab
Dragana Kaurin is a human rights researcher and ethnographer, and writes about forced displacement and refugee rights. She is the director and founder of the Localization Lab, providing localization, usability feedback and community-building for anti-surveillance and anti-censorship technology. She has worked at Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma, and in Crisis Information Management and Communications at UNOCHA and UNICEF, before joining the Open... Read More →
MP

Mike Posner

NYU Stern School of Business


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
*The Hub*

10:30am

10:30am

+1 for Transparency: Advocating for Accountable Content Moderation by Social Media Companies

This session will focus on how social media companies censor users’ speech on their platforms through the process of moderating content.

To kick off the discussion, we will highlight the first round of analysis of the data drawn from OnlineCensorship.org, a recently launched Knight News Challenge-winning project that crowdsources user-generated reports on the takedown of content, suspension of accounts, and other issues of content moderation. The data illustrates the often-discriminatory impact of these practices and users’ perceptions of company content moderation platforms.

The ultimate objective of the project is to hold these companies more accountable to their users. We’d love to hold a discussion with the participants about ways we can use this data to effectively do so. 

A few possible questions we might discuss during the workshop include:

- How is content moderation unequally affecting different communities (LGBTQ, human rights activists, artists, etc.)?

- How is abuse of the reporting function tied to censorship of certain communities?

- What would a more transparent and accountable moderation process look like?


Speakers
avatar for Jillian C. York

Jillian C. York

Director for International Freedom of Expression, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Talk to me about TOS enforcement and censorship on social platforms, or your work in the Middle East and North Africa.


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Demo Room

10:30am

10:30am

Open Integrity: Measuring Security and Privacy Best Practice
"Help define how we measure the adoption of best practices that support the security and privacy of software. Which tools are open-source or provide end-to-end encryption? Which implement forward secrecy or support two-factor authentication? Which have security features that are usable without prior expertise or training? Which can be downloaded securely and verified to be authentic? Data about the adoption of security and privacy best practices are often difficult to find and rarely easy for users to understand. How can the adoption of these practices be measured, and what is the most useful structure for such a broad range of measurements?

Over the past two years, we have assembled a list of a hundred possible metrics related to various aspects of software development, including governance, systems, architecture, build and user experience. Workshop participants will contribute to an ongoing consultation about best practices and their measurability. Together, we will build upon an open framework designed to guide the development of partnerships and infrastructure to collect metrics about software practices that impact end user privacy and security.

This framework will help clarify how specific practices mitigate specific threats and will provide a methodological context that will be kept up-to-date as the threat landscape evolves. Insights that currently surface in loose debates among experts will be captured in this structured conversation and integrated with available metrics to improve the transparency, reproducibility and traceability of key issues and assumptions.

The Open Integrity Index (https://openintegrity.org) collects, organises and publishes data about the adoption of software development best practices that impact end-user privacy and security. Through measurement partnerships and outreach partnerships, Open Integrity will support and extend efforts such as the EFF's Secure Messaging Scorecard, the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative and the Ranking Digital Rights project."

Speakers
JM

Jun Matsushita

CEO, iilab
CW

Chris Walker

Open Integrity Researcher, iilab


Friday April 1, 2016 10:30am - 11:45am
The Demo Room

12:00pm

The Transparency Reporting Toolkit: A Guide and Template for Best Practices in Reporting
New America’s Open Technology Institute and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University have spent the past year collecting and analyzing transparency reports released by over 40 of the largest U.S. Internet and telecommunications companies. The number of companies publishing “transparency reports” about their handling of government requests for user data skyrocketed as the Internet industry scrambled to rebuild lost trust in the wake of the Snowden revelations. But that explosion of reports led to a fragmentation of practices: there are no clear standards or best practices for startups and smaller companies looking to get into the game, and the data from companies that are currently reporting are a mess of apples and oranges, using different standards and definitions, and are therefore hard to compare or combine in a sensible way.

Together, OTI and the Berkman Center authored an eight-part memo that surveys the current landscape of transparency reporting and identifies best practices, highlighting issues where standardization of practices is most critical, such as terminology and categorization of legal processes. Using those best practices we created a guide to transparency reporting and a template for presenting report data in an easy-to-digest and standardized format. At RightsCon we will publicly launch and seek feedback on the reporting guide and template, encourage adoption of best practices, and speak with companies, civil society, and other stakeholders about the future of transparency reporting. We will also highlight the forthcoming and final piece of the Transparency Reporting Toolkit, set to launch in 2016: an online portal that promotes standardized transparency reporting and serves as a public repository for report data.

The overarching goal of the Transparency Reporting Toolkit is to strengthen transparency reporting and grow the community of reporters. We aim to do this first by making the process as easy as possible for new companies hoping to publish their first transparency reports, and second, by encouraging adoption of best practices. By settling on key terminology, definitions, and categorization, we can begin to unify reporting and make it possible to truly compare “apples to apples” across the transparency report ecosystem.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Budish

Ryan Budish

Senior Researcher, Berkman Center for Internet & Society
avatar for Liz Woolery

Liz Woolery

Open Technology Institute


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Nest

12:00pm

Who is an Intermediary? Harmonizing multiple definitions
Intermediaries are commonly viewed as passive and neutral actors, with various defences created to that end. Increasingly, however, service providers are being forced or expected to play a more active role in the process of law enforcement, whether this be to prevent the diffusion of offensive content or copyright infringement, enforce data subjects’ rights, or provide information to law enforcement agencies outside of their country of establishment. Are service providers doing too much? Or are they not doing enough? Have law­makers managed to strike the right balance between their rights and duties? Is international law equipped to deal with the increasing transnational interaction between law enforcement and service providers?

Grappling with the dichotomous realities in the digital environment, intermediaries often go overboard with compliance standards resulting in restriction of individual freedoms and censorship. The latter is often compounded by uninformed intermediary liability policies, blunt and heavy­handed regulatory measures, failing to meet the principles of necessity and proportionality, and a lack of consistency across these policies create an uncertain environment for intermediaries to operate in. There has been increasing recognition that intermediaries require stronger accountability and restriction benchmarks that would allow for fairer assessments, accurate showcasing and democratization of using appropriate and relevant tools.

Defining which platforms and services constitute intermediaries is critical to developing a balanced regulatory framework for liability. Any definition of an intermediary should account for the various roles and functions that intermediaries perform in relation to unlawful content. It must also note, the different categories of platforms and services being clustered under the definition. This is an important consideration, given that intermediaries serve multiple functions in relation to content, for example a platform may transmit and host third party content and the process of categorization is often, not clear cut. Further, online intermediaries increasingly employ automated agents such as applications rather than human actors when handling third party content.

Search engines are an example of this as they perform as services which offer the user a spectrum of hyperlinks, characterized by the search parameters determined by the user. Based on automatic referencing to desired content could lead to the conclusion that they resemble a technical tool, however, it has to be taken into account that search engines can concentrate on searching specific contents like pictures, music or other digital content.In contrast, hyperlinks are selected consciously which implies that actual knowledge of the content is a prerequisite, even though this does not imply that this would lead to knowledge of changes made in content after the hyperlink has been set. Finally, there are hybrid forms between search engines and hyperlinks, like web sites containing hyperlinks generated by a search engine and results are published to a large community.

More importantly, intermediaries may perform simultaneous and competing roles in relation to producing, disseminating and as end users of content. Another critical distinction to bear in mind is that online service providers may also deliver their own content and definitions must evolve bearing this distinction between 'pure' intermediaries in an intermediation role between third parties and those intermediaries that give access to, host, transmit or index content or services that they themselves originate.

Given the complexity of functions and roles that intermediaries serve, it is not surprising that definition of intermediaries varies widely in its interpretation and application across jurisdictions and regimes. Different types of Internet intermediaries may have different legal responsibilities under the various national or supranational regimes. The most common categories are mere conduits (or communications or access providers), hosts, providers of caching services, and search engines (or information location tools) or other linking intermediaries.

There are some edge cases that do not clearly fall into this definition, depending on one’s interpretation.These include manufacturers of products (rather than services) that are used for accessing content, such as Web browser and Internet filtering software for example Apple now supports content blocking. Content producers are excluded but can serve both functions for example newspapers for UGC. When developing liability rules for intermediaries, it is important that legal requirements are appropriate and proportional to the function and size of the intermediary. Thus the definition of an intermediary that we use may not coincide with the legal definition of an intermediary in a particular jurisdiction, which in any case, differs markedly from one country to another.

The question of “who is an intermediary?” is not merely a question of linguistics, given the existing uncertainties and differences in definition that exist within the same jurisdiction and across regimes of data protection and liability regimes. For example, who can be considered an 'intermediary' within Article 11 of the Enforcement Directive, so that “rightholders are in a position to apply for an injunction” against such subjects “whose services are used by a third party to infringe an intellectual property right, without prejudice to Article 8(3) of Directive 2001/29/EC [the InfoSoc Directive]”? Are 'intermediaries' the same subjects that the Ecommerce Directive refers to as 'information society service providers', and the InfoSoc Directive also calls 'intermediaries'?

Consider the heated arguments on the functions of certain platforms and services for example whether search engines may be considered intermediaries within Article 11 of the Enforcement Directive and increasing obligations on ISPs in tackling online infringements. The lack of certainty in defining intermediaries is evident in decisions such as the right to be forgotten ruling which seek to apply differing standards of data retention and data sharing obligations to the same function of intermediaries-search engines.

Legal conflicts do exist due to smorgasbord of definitions and approaches being applied to intermediaries across jurisdictions and regimes. Some obvious areas of conflict for intermediaries have emerged in the areas of IP enforcement, Transnational access to data, Security obligations, Domestic issues such as hate speech, public order, violence and harassment, Terrorism, Right to be forgotten, and more broadly in the approaches, defences, immunities and obligations applied to intermediaries.

Speakers
GF

Giancarlo Frosio

Intermediary Liability Fellow, CIS Stanford
GG

Gabrielle Guillemin

Senior Legal Officer, ARTICLE 19
Gabrielle is Senior Legal Officer at ARTICLE 19, an international free speech organisation based in London. She has been leading the organisation's work on internet policy issues since 2011. She is a member of the UK Multistakeholder Advisory Group on Internet Governance (MAGIG) and an independent expert attached to the Council of Europe committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet Freedoms. Prior to ARTICLE 19, Gabrielle... Read More →
EH

Elonnai Hickok

Director - Internet Governance, Centre for Internet and Society
JC

Juan Carlos Lara

Content Director, Derechos Digitales Chile
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fireside

12:00pm

Following “Connecting the Dots”: how to measure Internet Universality
UNESCO Member States during its 38th General Conference, adopted the strong multi-stakeholder Connecting the Dots Outcome document on Internet-issues under UNESCO’s mandate as a comprehensive agenda for the Organization’s approach to Internet-issues under its mandate, programme and budget. They also endorsed the Internet Universality and its four ROAM principles which advocate for a human Rights-based, Open and Accessible Internet governed by Multi- stakeholder participation.
Within the framework “Internet Universality” concept, UNESCO is engaging the stakeholders to discuss and seek further elaboration of indicators to measure the R.O.A.M dimensions, which would serve a useful tool for Member States and other stakeholders to understand the Internet ecosystem and identify and assess the interventions needed.
UNESCO would also take the occasion to share its recent sixth edition of Internet Freedom series, “Principles for governing the Internet: a comparative analysis” which has conducted both quantitative and qualitative assessments of more than 50 Internet related declarations, guidelines, and frameworks in the context of UNESCO’s interested areas such as access, freedom of expression, privacy, ethics, Priority Gender Equality, and Priority Africa, and sustainable development, etc.
Background documents:

Link to UNESCO Internet Study “Keystones to foster inclusive Knowledge Societies”: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/internetstudy/

Link to UNESCO publication: “Principles for governing the Internet: a comparative analysis”
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/publications-and-communication-materials/publications/full-list/principles-for-governing-the-internet/

Link to UNESCO Concept note on Internet Universality:
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/crosscutting-priorities/unesco-internet-study/internet-universality/


Link to ConnectingtheDots Outcome documents of UNESCO: http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CI/CI/pdf/outcome_document.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Sanja Kelly

Sanja Kelly

Director, Freedom on the Net, Freedom House
Freedom House
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Andrew Puddephatt

Andrew Puddephatt

Director, global partners digital
Director of Global Partners and Association
FL

Frank La Rue

Assistant Director General for Communication and Information at UNESCO
avatar for Nicolas Seidler

Nicolas Seidler

Senior Policy advisor, The Internet Society
Nicolas Seidler is Senior Policy Advisor at the Internet Society. He joined the organization in February 2010 and currently leads ISOC’s work on Internet and Human Rights issues. He also engages in key global Internet governance issues and processes. | | Nicolas works with a broad spectrum of international partners, global policy makers and non-governmental stakeholders on a range of Internet issues. In this role he contributes to ISOC's... Read More →
MV

Mario Viola

Institute for Technology and Society of Rio


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Bridge

12:00pm

From Digital Divides to Language Divides: Towards Principles for Digital Language Inclusion
As we move to a world where most of the population is connected to the internet, and as more communities network with each other around the world, language divides present a significant hurdle to fostering truly global communication and information awareness. While in theory the world can connect with each other across borders, in practice the internet we see and interact with is limited to the language we speak. These limitations steadily increase for those who do not speak majority languages like English, Mandarin, Spanish, Arabic and others.

In this workshop, speakers will engage in a 20 minute panel discussion on how digital language inequity and access has played out in their work. The goal of this discussion will be to spark the conversation and identify some of the most salient issues for those working in communications technologies and human rights.

We will then break into small group discussions around the following core questions:

What are the most pressing issues around language access in digital spaces today? This appears to be a “full stack” problem that stretches from typography and fonts to content availability to the very code by which our software is built. In a world of constraints, how would we prioritize how we address these issues?
How can we aim to improve linguistic access and intercommunication? What actions can organizations and technologists take today, and what actions can we start moving toward for more sustainable support?
What models can we learn from as we start to imagine a more linguistically-inclusive internet? What successes have we seen--whether formally or informally implemented--that point to a possible future?

The goal of this conversation will be to identify guiding principles for language access and inclusion that organizations should abide by.

Speakers
ME

Mohamed El Gohary

Lingua Manager and Board Member, Global Voices
avatar for Cayden Mak

Cayden Mak

Chief Technology Officer, 18MillionRising.org
Chief Technological Officer, 18 Million Rising
avatar for An Xiao Mina

An Xiao Mina

Director of Product, Meedan
An “An Xiao” Mina is a technologist, writer and artist. She leads the product team at Meedan, where they build tools for global journalism and translation. She was recently a 2016 Visiting Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow and a 2013 USC Getty Arts Journalism Fellow.An “An Xiao” Mina is a technologist, writer and artist. She leads the product team at Meedan, where they build tools for global journalism and translation. She was... Read More →
KR

Kathleen Reen

Vice President for ICT Policy and Programs, Internews


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Lab

12:00pm

Gender Diversity in Tech: Less Words, More Outcomes
Panelists will use first third of session time to describe four problem
statements regarding gender diversity in the tech industry with personal professional anecdotes, remaining two thirds
will be used for audience to choose a roundtable station for each
problem statement and post-it note brainstorm potential solutions for
each problem statement, facilitated by the speakers. The audience will
self-select whether their solutions are pragmatic (working within
current paradigm), disruptive (blow up/reboot the current paradigm),
resilient (self-preservation). The facilitator will look to consolidate
like-minded solutions and see where there is consensus, read out to the entire group, and make the solutions available for display for attendees to view
and sign up to move the solution forward.

Speakers
avatar for Krys Freeman

Krys Freeman

Founder, HeLLa Rides
Krys Freeman is one of today’s rising entrepreneurs, technologists and visionaries - and a firm believer in technology as a vehicle for radical change. Equal parts hacker, strategist and activist, Krys is a resource for everything from the best “productivity” apps, to those that provide convenience through sharing. S/he seeks out projects that stretch our imagination and is committed to finding new ways to use technology to tackle our... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Fishbowl

12:00pm

The New Policymakers: The Benefits and Perils of Multistakeholderism
How to protect Internet users’ rights has never been an easy question for lawmakers or the courts. Increasingly, it’s being left to multistakeholder (MSH) processes — non-governmental vehicles composed of industry, civil society, and academics. Government sometimes participates actively, convenes the discussion, or simply lurks in the background. Internet governance has long been handled primarily through a variety of MSH processes whether through formal institutions like ICANN and the IGF, or through ongoing standards-setting and private dispute resolution. On privacy, the Obama Administration has hailed MSH processes as providing the “flexibility, speed, and decentralization necessary to address Internet policy challenges.” Its Commerce department has convened a series of MSH fora on notice, facial recognition and drones.

Multistakeholderism, it seems, is the future of Internet policymaking. But what are the different models of decisionmaking grouped together behind that general term? How do they compare with European models of co-regulation? What does it mean for them to be “appropriately structured?” How can, and should, governments steer MSH processes? What are their advantages and pitfalls? What does their growing use mean for how user rights are protected? What cautionary tales should we learn from past MSH experiments, or from other private bodies that have attempted to deal with new media, from bygone censorship codes to more recent child protection efforts?

We aim generally to produce a clearer understanding of the various models of MSH processes. We willl also focus the conversation around two questions: (1) Can we agree on a common definition of “multistakeholder” or of sub-concepts under that umbrella term and (2) could civil society groups dedicated to user rights, but from across the political spectrum and with different substantive areas of focus, agree on a joint statement of principle and build on such definitions about how to structure MSH processes to avoid undue influence by government, incumbent companies, or other special interests?

Speakers
avatar for Bennett Freeman

Bennett Freeman

Co-Founder & Board Secretary, Affiliation Global Network Initiative
Over the last 17 years of a three decade-long career, Bennett Freeman has worked at the intersection of multinational companies, responsible investors, NGOs, governments and international institutions to promote corporate responsibility, sustainability and human rights around the world. An innovative leader in the fields of business and human rights, natural resource governance and responsible investment, he has played key roles in developing and... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca MacKinnon

Rebecca MacKinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights, New America Foundation
Ranking Digital Rights
avatar for Shane Tews

Shane Tews

IEF Board, American Enterprise Institute
Internet Governance, Cyber security, Privacy, Data Protection, IANA, ICANN, Domain Name Policy, Cloud computing


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Slate

12:00pm

The Human Rights Response to the Zero-rating Conundrum
Most debates around zero-rating and net neutrality lack rigor, objectivity, and practical impact. People insist on maintaining different and often irreconcilable dogmatic perspectives, and thus tend to talk past each other. But, is there a perspective that reasonable people could agree on that permits fruitful discussion and enlightened policymaking? There is one: international human rights law. This panel examines the framework that exists under international law for analyzing zero-rating as a limitation to net neutrality understood as a norm of human rights, which it indisputably is. When viewed in context, zero-rating and net neutrality present a conflict of rights -- right to impart & receive information vs right to access the Internet/connectivity -- that can be productively analyzed using the exceptions regime to freedom of expression defined by international human rights law. Under this normative framework, which binds at least 80% of the countries in the world, exceptions to net neutrality like zero-rating are evaluated in specific country scenarios using a balancing test of factors to determine whether, on the whole, freedom of expression is advanced or illegitimately curtailed in a particular context.

Panelists will address the situation of net neutrality and zero-rating in a range of countries across different regions, including Chile, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan and Philippines. In analyzing the issues in their respective countries, each speaker will apply the human rights law framework to evaluate the competing positions on all sides of the debate (to the extent there is one). This approach should generate new perspectives on those countries' domestic zero-rating practices, as well as provide a common baseline for constructive comparison across countries, something which does not currently exist.

The outcomes from this panel will be several. First, it will promote a better understanding of the relatively "new" but essential normative framework provided by human rights for analyzing the seemingly intractable challenges of zero-rating and net neutrality playing out worldwide. Second, the panel will help develop the parameters of that framework by applying it to several country case studies, enabling a more coherent approach to comparative net neutrality as well. Third, it will shed light on specific country situations and inform the ongoing or future policy debates there from the perspective of local advocates. These outcomes should lead (hopefully) to more comprehensive analyses in subsequent research carried out by the panelists, conference participants, and others. Finally, if the session is recorded, it would prove an invaluable resource into the future for advocates, policy-makers and researchers grappling with zero-rating issues locally and internationally.

Speakers
avatar for Luis Fernando Garcia

Luis Fernando Garcia

Director, R3D
JC

Juan Carlos Lara

Content Director, Derechos Digitales Chile
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Sana Saleem

Sana Saleem

Director, Bolo Bhi
Co-founder and Director of Bolo Bhi. I am reelance journalist, researcher, rights advocate and public policy consultant. I have written for Dawn, The Guardian and have been writing for Global Voices for the past five years, where I currently work as Editor for Pakistan. In 2012, I was listed among Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers for her work on free speech and was recognized for my work on #BBC100 women of 2014. I am also on the... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
*The Hub*

12:00pm

The Digital Threat of ISIS
We want to discuss the tactics used by ISIS to attack its opponents online as well as use the Internet to change the narrative related to the war in Syria, recruit terrorists, and plan attacks. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (often referred to as ISIS, ISIL, or The Islamic State) is becoming increasingly technologically sophisticated in the way it targets its adversaries. The first known ISIS-sponsored online attack occurred in October 2014, when the organization launched its cyber-warfare program with targeted DDoS website attacks, phishing campaigns, and malware programs. The Syrian activist group, “Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently,” was ISIS’s first target of both a phishing attack and malware. While ISIS used to rely singularly on social engineering attacks, whereby it tricked Internet users into divulging personal information online, it has recently begun to customize malware, demonstrating more sophisticated technical skills.
It is also using the Internet for its own communication, which has challenged the internal policies and community standards of online social networking platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, and forced them to shut down accounts affiliated with ISIS and its supporters on numerous occasions. ISIS supporters in turn also appeal to these same standards to report information, especially graphic photographs, posted by civil society and human rights activists to illustrate ISIS’s own crimes. Facebook and other resources end out taking down some of these materials, inadvertently limiting information available to the public about ISIS’s terrorist activity. Finally, ISIS is beginning to use encrypted communication methods to conceal its plans and tactics, which poses a significant new challenge to civil society as well as the law enforcement looking to monitor and prevent terrorist activity.

Speakers
avatar for John B. Jaeger

John B. Jaeger

CEO/Founder, Hala Systems, Inc.
John B. Jaeger recently spent over 3 years in his capacity as a US Department of State official working directly with Syrians and multiple USG and ally entities to help counter violent extremism, create communications networks, train civilian leadership, inform the populace, strengthen independent voices, increase resilience, and reduce physical, digital, and psycho-social threats. John now leads an awesome team of humans at Hala, a for-profit... Read More →
avatar for Dlshad Othman

Dlshad Othman

Dlshad Othman is award winning Kurdish - Syrian software engineer, specialist in information security And U.S State Department Internet Freedom fellow, Dlshad focuses on providing digital security resources and assistance to journalists and civil society organizations  that they can utilize online communications and advocacy freely and securely in spite of increased online governments repression in the form of censorship, sophisticated... Read More →
avatar for Honey Al Sayed

Honey Al Sayed

Creative Consultant/Producer
Honey Al Sayed is a Syrian citizen who has lived in Damascus, Syria from the year 2000 to 2012. She was born and raised in Kuwait, attended high school in Egypt and university in Lebanon. | | She was raised in an entrepreneurial family that led businesses in high-end fashion retail, advertising, art gallery and professional photography; all that run to this day. | | Graduate of the Fletcher School of Law and... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Cottage

12:00pm

12:00pm

Power to the People: Tech Demos and Lightning Talks
"Information Everywhere or Nowhere? Uniting global and community-led data for human and environmental rights"
ID: 248 — Ryan Schlief (Executive Director, International Accountability Project)
In one of the most extensive community-led surveys on development, 800 people in 8 countries surveyed themselves about their experiences with development projects and what recommendations they had to change the process. With data and personal stories, the community-led research and mobilization process led to a report which strengthened local and national advocacy campaigns towards the World Bank and others funding development. The first of its kind, IAP’s report, Back to Development – A Call For What Development Could Be, shows how community-led research and expertise can document abuses and recommend alternatives in policy and practice at the international level. Complementing the community-led research, the Early Warning System gathers data on proposed development projects around the world. The project ensures local communities, and the organizations that support them, have verified information about the projects and clear strategies for advocacy. During this session IAP hopes to share how access to information on both the global and local levels can reinforce community-led priorities for development and protect human and environmental rights.

"Access My Info"
ID: 188 — Andrew Hilts (Executive Director, Open Effect)
Access My Info (AMI) is a web application that supports citizens in creating legally-justified requests for access to their personal information from either private companies or government. In 2014, we released a beta version of the software, focused on the telecommunications industry in Canada. Tens of thousands of people used the tool to create requests, which pushed telcos to develop streamlined processes for responding to requests, and helped encourage their publication of transparency reports. We will provide a walkthrough for the application’s three major components: the front-end request creation tool; the backend CMS that lets administrators organize data operators, services, types of personal data collected, and legal request templates; and finally, the participant data system that collects statistics, and sends reminders and feedback requests to opted-in users. We will describe our future plans to implement and internationalize AMI in a variety of jurisdictions around the world, translating the user interface and working with partners in different regions to develop legal request templates focused on priority categories.

"Becoming an Active Impact Investor: How to Use Shareholder Proposals to Uphold Human Rights"
ID: 213 — Ron Roman (Researcher, San Jose State University)
An underutilized tool to motivate companies to protect human rights is the shareholder proposal. Any shareholder who meets minimal ownership qualifications can file a shareholder proposal. In this Lightning Talk, you’ll discover how investors with just a small financial position can inspire change in organizations. Professor Roman will detail how his shareholder proposal motivated Costco to increase transparency in its cotton supply chain and engage in best practices to reduce and eliminate forced and slave labor in global cotton sourcing. Come and learn how you can use your investments and retirement fund to become not just an investor, but an active impact investor.

"Digital tools to realize analog rights: The MyVoice citizen feedback platform"
ID: 195 — Zack Brisson (Principal & Co-Founder, Reboot)
Even when citizens have a right to basic services such as healthcare or education, they often receive sub-standard services or none at all. The spread of digital tools and widespread (and increasing) access to mobile and internet connectivity present exciting new opportunities to improve the delivery of public services by amplifying citizen voice. In this session, Reboot will present an open source tool that we built and piloted, along with an accompanying programmatic intervention, in rural Nigeria. We will share stories of how our user-centered design approach to developing and implementing the tool led to real-life impact, and we will offer a vision for how we hope to collaborate with others in adapting and scaling to improve public service delivery worldwide. Reboot designed and first implemented My Voice in rural Nigeria, but this flexible tool is ripe for adaptation and scaling to many different sectors and geographic contexts. We hope that the discussion inspires attendees to think about how they might use their own technology skills, networks, and own experiences to further the use of communications technology to improve analog service delivery experiences. In short, how might we convert the expansion of digital rights and digital access into improvements in the “analog” delivery of basic human services?

"Crowdraising Action: Math as a gateway to activism"
ID: 483 — Kipchoge Spencer (CEO, Take 2), Thomas Spellman (CTO, Take2)
Think about raising money for your unknown band pre- and post- Kickstarter. Very different animals. Think about soliciting volunteers to support your online activist campaign before and after SOPA/PIPA. Nothing much has changed. We're using thresholds to encourage participation and guarantee outcomes.

"Activist Counter-Surveillance Toolkit"
ID: 114 — John Green (Cirvent Labs), Loc Nguyen (Cirvent Labs)
There's no denying your arsenal is inadequate. We will detail and focus on operational applications & tools that provide novel countermeasures against a well-equipped adversary. Currently, the toolkit provides solutions to address device seizures, provides for deniability and thwarts cursory device implants. These solutions take the form of kill-switches, deadman switches, and Machine Learning-backed mobile malware defenses. 

Speakers
avatar for Zack Brisson

Zack Brisson

Principal & Co-Founder, Reboot
A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policy making, program design, and implementation. He has worked in some of the world’s most challenging political environments, including post-revolutionary Tunisia, rural Pakistan, the Niger Delta, and Washington DC, in the service of delivering more just, accountable, and inclusive governance. Reboot is a social impact firm, with offices in New... Read More →
avatar for John Green

John Green

Co-Founder, Cervent Labs
Cirvent Labs
avatar for Loc Nguyen

Loc Nguyen

Co-Founder, Cervent Labs
Circumvention and Circumvention accessories
avatar for Ryan Schlief

Ryan Schlief

Executive Director, International Accountability Project
TS

Thomas Spellman

Chief Technology Officer, Take2
avatar for Kipchoge Spencer

Kipchoge Spencer

CEO/Founder, Take2
Kipchoge is a career-hopping musician, adventurer, activist and entrepreneur. His current project, a startup called Take2, makes activism more satisfying and engaging so people do it more often. | | Take2 is like Kickstarter for movement building. Client organizations (and individuals) build campaigns, and their supporters pledge minutes or votes rather than money. Different pledge actions have different time commitments (e.g. 5 min to... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Demo Room

1:15pm

Tech4Good
Speakers
avatar for Cameron Jones

Cameron Jones

Vice President, Technology Solutions & Services, Tech Soup
Cameron Jones oversees the development of innovative services and solutions for the global nonprofit sector, including IT consulting and management services, nonprofit validation services, and refurbished hardware. She has a long and successful track record of leading globally distributed, cross-functional teams to implement complex programs across multiple geographies and languages.    Cameron joined TechSoup in 2007 to manage the... Read More →
JN

Justin Nelson

Corporate, External and Legal Affairs (CELA), Microsoft


Friday April 1, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
The Lab

1:15pm

Technology Donations & Resources Supporting Human Rights Defenders
Come learn what software and cloud services are available through the Microsoft Nonprofit Product Donations program. Cloud Services and Software Donations are available globally to eligible nonprofits, and Microsoft partners with TechSoup to deliver training and resources to help nonprofits leverage Microsoft technologies to more effectively drive impact.

Speakers
avatar for Cameron Jones

Cameron Jones

Vice President, Technology Solutions & Services, Tech Soup
Cameron Jones oversees the development of innovative services and solutions for the global nonprofit sector, including IT consulting and management services, nonprofit validation services, and refurbished hardware. She has a long and successful track record of leading globally distributed, cross-functional teams to implement complex programs across multiple geographies and languages.    Cameron joined TechSoup in 2007 to manage the... Read More →
JN

Justin Nelson

Corporate, External and Legal Affairs (CELA), Microsoft
HS

Hassen Selmi

Access Now


Friday April 1, 2016 1:15pm - 2:15pm
The Lab

1:15pm

Brainstorming solutions to increase the impact of civil society groups on internet governance in the MENA region?
Internet governance in the Arab region is facing challenges, some of which are embodied in inefficient communication between different stakeholders. While some venues and events, such as the Arab IGF, attempt to provide spaces of dialogue, they often fall short from delivering. Criticisms of Arab IGF are centered around its inability to provide quality content and outcomes that are seen in other regional internet governance conferences. Some of the reasons for that shortcoming include:
  • Organization and (funding) of the conferences are mainly saturated in the hands of the governments;
  • Inability of civil society to take a leading role in organizing these conferences due to weak coordination and communication between CSO on a regional level;
  • Absence of good representation of the regional private sector.


Moderators
avatar for Al Walid Chennoufi

Al Walid Chennoufi

Digital Security Coordinator, Access Now
avatar for Amin Jobran

Amin Jobran

Outreach Manager - MENA, ASL19
Community coordinator at ASL19 for MENA region (especially Arabic speaking countries) I deal with tool localization, Outreach, and user support. I enjoy neutralizing any content blocking efforts by governments and telecoms.

Speakers
avatar for Walid Al-Saqaf

Walid Al-Saqaf

Postdoctoral Researcher, Stockholm University
ISOC Board Member, software developer from Yemen, internet freedom advocate. Currently involved in postdoctoral research and teaching in areas related to technology, media, journalism, data science, and quantitative research methods. Also involved in ICANN and APC.
avatar for Hanane Boujemi

Hanane Boujemi

Senior Manager Internet Governance Programme MENA Region, Hivos
Manager of Hivos’ MENA region programme on Internet Governance. She is responsible for the design and implementation of the programme in the Arab region. | | • Develop and implement programs and activities to build capacity on Internet Governance and policy among civil society organizations and actors in the Arab region | • Facilitate strategy development and other technical assistance activities | • Lead all areas of... Read More →
avatar for Rafik Dammak

Rafik Dammak

Non-commercial Stakeholder Group former Chair, NTT
He is engineer working and living in Japan. He is member of the steering committee for the Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles . He has been involved in ICANN community as NCUC (Non-commercial users constituency) individual user member, former elected GNSO Councillor for the Non-Commercial Stakeholder Group, ICANN nomcom member in addition to his participation in several ICANN WGs like the new gTLD applicant support where he was... Read More →
avatar for Noha Fathy

Noha Fathy

Project Lead, Internet Legislation Atlas, Hivos Internet Governance for MENA region
Noha is managing Internet Legislation Atlas project for Hivos. She has been working with Hivos Internet Governance in the Middle East and North Africa (iGmena) program (www.igmena.org) since 2013. | | She concentrates on internet governance capacity building and awareness raising activities to civil society in the Arab region. She worked on a number of projects that aimed at raising awareness about digital rights, engaging local... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
The Fishbowl

1:15pm

Digital Asia Hub -- Open House

Interested in digital rights? Live in, work with or have a wish-list for Asia? Learn about the Digital Asia Hub, and throw your ideas into the hat. Or onto the whiteboard.

Incubated by the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and a broader collective of diverse, international partners, the Hub is a Hong Kong-based not-for-profit that will provide a nonpartisan, open, and collaborative platform for research, knowledge sharing, and capacity building related to Internet and society issues with a focus on digital Asia. The Hub also aims to strengthen effective multi-stakeholder discourse, with both local and regional activities, and will contribute to - and itself serve as a node of - a larger network of academic organizations: the Global Network of Internet and Society Research Centers (NoC).

At the core of the Digital Asia Hub is independent and interdisciplinary research exploring both the opportunities and challenges related to digital technology, innovation, and society in Asia. Initial issues the Hub may explore include digital rights, governance and infrastructure, innovation, open manufacturing, and digital trade, trending technologies and technology spaces, mobile technology and its impact on access, education, entrepreneurship, and the use of ICT for development and civic engagement. Another goal of the Digital Asia Hub is to develop a robust community that shares a deep interest in and commitment to Internet and society research. It will facilitate local and regional approaches to shaping and embracing emerging opportunities in digital Asia, and it will initiate and support cross-cultural, sectoral, and disciplinary dialogues and collaborations.

Executive Director, Malavika Jayaram, is happy to chat on the Patio during lunch. 


Speakers
avatar for Malavika Jayaram

Malavika Jayaram

Executive Director, Digital Asia Hub
Malavika is the inaugural Executive Director of the Digital Asia Hub, Hong Kong. Incubated by the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and a diverse group of academic, civil society, and private sector partners, the Hub provides a non-partisan, open, and collaborative platform for research, knowledge sharing, and capacity building related to Internet and society issues with a focus on digital Asia. | | In a... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Second Floor Patio

2:30pm

How to Fight an Internet Shutdown: announcing the #KeepitOn campaign

Come join Access Now as we launch our global campaign to fight internet shutdowns.


Part I: we’ll share key strategic lessons from our global #KeepitOn campaign to fight shutdowns -- how they hurt human rights, stymie local economies, and block the use of emergency services -- and what you can do to push back. 

 

Part II: join us for a fun, interactive simulation that invites participants to respond to a fake shutdown. Through a group role play, we’ll show what tools people can use to resist shutdowns and turn the internet back on so that the information can keep flowing.


 

Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
*The Hub*

2:30pm

Manila Principles: One Year Later
Last year at RightsCon, the Manila Principles on Intermediary Liability were launched. After one year, the global threats facing intermediaries—and, more importantly, their users—are greater than ever. For example, there is considerable political pressure in Europe to raise new obligations for intermediaries who host illegal content "actively" rather than "passively", such as establishing a duty of care, and making Content ID and notice­-and­-staydown compulsory. These measures would result in a further chilling of users' speech and a narrowing of the space available for the exercise of their human rights online.

On the other hand some argue that there could be certain areas such as data security and cyber security that attract a positive liability framework. For example, there are websites on the internet that exist solely for promoting revenge porn or online extremism. There are several examples where people continue to suffer even after they have identified illegal content because intermediaries refuse to take down content. Further even if individuals are able to obtain court orders for the removal of content in a particular jurisdiction, there is no way to ensure that they are enforceable in another jurisdiction.

This session will address these tensions and provide an opportunity to air both sides of this debate. The session will begin with a recap of the Manila Principles for newcomers, outlining how they have been applied during their first year, and the current challenges that we face.

The session will then move into a facilitated discussion of strategies on how the Manila Principles can be applied to present policy windows to counter current threats to users of intermediaries' services and protect freedom of expression while enabling an environment for innovation and balancing the needs of governments and other stakeholders. Such policy windows could include the platform consultation in Europe, the General Data Protection Regulation also in Europe, and unfavorable national intermediary liability regimes such as in Austria.

Lastly, the session will introduce the Manila Principles' next generation document, which is a draft template notice of alleged illegal content, designed as a tool for intermediaries to use to contact their users. The notice, although not compulsory for those who endorse the Manila Principles, is intended to be complementary to it, and would standardize the information that users receive, ensuring that they are not fed misleading or incomplete information.

Speakers
avatar for Kenneth Carter

Kenneth Carter

Counsel, CloudFlare
Ken Carter is Counsel at CloudFlare which has an ambitious goal – build a better Internet. CloudFlare's services protect and accelerate more than 4 million websites by automatically optimizing the delivery of web pages so visitors get the best performance possible. He was recently selected as Bay Area Corporate Counsel of the Year 2016. | | Before joining CloudFlare, Ken was Policy Counsel for Advanced Networks and Access Services at... Read More →
avatar for Eve Chaurand

Eve Chaurand

General Counsel & Secretary, Change.org
EH

Elonnai Hickok

Director - Internet Governance, Centre for Internet and Society
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
avatar for Mark Stephens, CBE

Mark Stephens, CBE

Independent Board Chair, Global Network Initiative
Mark Stephens, CBE is the Independent Board Chair of the Global Network Initiative. A British lawyer specializing in international commercial dispute resolution, media law, human rights and intellectual property, Mark has undertaken some of the highest profile cases in the UK and around the world defending the free expression rights of artists, journalists, and the rights of online publishers in libel cases. He currently heads the international... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Bridge

2:30pm

Privacy & Free Expression: Institutionalizing human rights commitments at a company
As new start-ups emerge and existing companies grapple with how their operations intersect with human rights, including freedom of expression and privacy, responsible decision-making processes are essential. Building privacy and free expression protection into products and business plans isn’t just the right thing to do—it’s good for business. In this session, Chris Conley of the ACLU of Northern California will discuss his organization’s finding that companies that take proactive steps to design user-protective products and business plans have not only been able to mitigate risks for their users, but have also benefited from positive external recognition and increased customer trust. Nicole Karlebach and Katie Shay of Yahoo will provide an in-depth look at how Yahoo has worked to integrate human rights thinking into its business decision-making processes. They will share how Yahoo has structured its Business & Human Rights Program and how it approaches its commitments in the areas of free expression and privacy. Participants in this session will leave with a better understanding of: What the key human rights issues are for Internet companies; How respect for human rights can be consistent with business goals; and How one company has structured a dedicated human rights program to be able to inject human rights analysis into business decision-making. Participants will also meet the leaders of Yahoo’s Business and Human Rights Program, who can serve as resources for start-ups and companies looking to internalize human rights decision-making in their companies.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Conley

Chris Conley

Technology and Civil Liberties Policy Attorney, ACLU of Northern California
Chris Conley is the technology and civil Liberties policy attorney at the ACLU of Northern California, where his work focuses on the intersection of privacy, free speech, and emerging technology. As a lawyer and technologist, he has worked extensively on the connection between consumer products and individual rights, particularly concerns about third party "apps" that have access to social network or mobile device data without adequate controls... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Karlebach

Nicole Karlebach

Senior Legal Counsel, Business & Human Rights, Yahoo
Nicole Karlebach is Yahoo’s Senior Legal Counsel, Business & Human Rights, leading and executing Yahoo’s efforts to promote privacy and free expression on the Internet and to identify innovative solutions to human rights challenges. Prior to joining Yahoo, Nicole worked as an attorney at Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP in New York, as an international policy fellow at Human Rights First examining issues of business and human rights... Read More →
avatar for Katie Shay

Katie Shay

Legal Counsel, Business & Human Rights, Yahoo
Katie manages and executes Yahoo’s initiatives to promote privacy and free expression on the Internet and to identify innovative solutions to human rights challenges. Prior to joining Yahoo, Katie was the Legal and Policy Coordinator at the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (“ICAR”), where she led policy development and rights-based advocacy initiatives in the area of business & human rights, particularly... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Engine

2:30pm

Communication, Coordination and Liberation – technology, safety & movement building in the global LGBTI community.
How do we move beyond human rights abuse recording, crisis mapping and documentation to a proactive and coordinated global movement for LGBTI activism using technology? The panel will interrogate the traditional approaches to technology in movement building by assessing behavior and not tools, taking a people-centered approach, assessing and managing risks of using technology, and linking technology to real-world action, all while ensuring digital safety and security. The panel will bring in activists from different parts of the world to draw on and compare experiences as they face drastically different circumstances around access, privacy, and freedom of expression that shape the use of technology by the LGBTI population.

The panel will also provide an opportunity to address specific questions related to navigating the closing space for civil society and the unique function of technology as intervention, symptom and signifier, specifically for LGBTI activists and organizations in hostile environments.
♣ What does digital security actually mean to/for queer activists in different contexts, especially rural and grassroots activists?
-- Zero-rating apps for online dating, acceptance of the transgender community in some countries
♣ What are the new challenges and barriers to access to technology that are imposed by governments, which contribute to the closing space for LGBTI activists and wider civil society?
-- Lack of trust by the LGBTI community
-- How named policies affect those outside of the US
♣ What opportunities exist for developers to impact the LGBTI communities and expand reach and scope of technology without compromising safety and security?
-- How is technology connecting oppressed and vulnerable LGBTI communities across the globe?
-- What are the ways this can be coordinated, made more accessible and expanded and relevant to queer activists in the Global South and East?
♣ How is technology, or lack thereof, excluding LGBTI activists from their own movements?
-- Deception and abuse on social media
-- Online censorship impacts LGBTI communities
♣ What must we do to ensure the long term success for these movements and how can technology play a role in this?

Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder, Digital Rights Foundation
Nighat Dad is a Pakistani lawyer and Internet activist who founded the not-for-profit organisation Digital Rights Foundation. In 2015, she was named in the TIME magazine's list of next generation leaders, for helping Pakistani women fight online harassment. | Dad led campaigns to protect online freedom of speech in Pakistan as well campaigns against legislation that gives the government broad powers of surveillance online, most notable one is the... Read More →
avatar for Kerry-Jo Lyn

Kerry-Jo Lyn

Director, LGBT Global Development Partnership, Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice
THE ASTRAEA LESBIAN FOUNDATION FOR JUSTICE is the only philanthropic organization working exclusively to advance LGBTQI human rights around the globe. We support brilliant and brave grantee partners in the U.S. and internationally who challenge oppression and seed change. We work for racial, economic, social, and gender justice, because we all deserve to live our lives freely, without fear, and with dignity.
avatar for Indyra Mendoza

Indyra Mendoza

Coordinator, Red Lésbica Cattrachas
Indyra Mendoza Aguilar is the Coordinator of Cattrachas a lesbian feminist organization dedicated to advocating for and defending the human rights of the LGBTTI community in Honduras. Indyra is an economist, researcher and Gender Studies expert. Cattrachas leads an Observatorio or Human Rights Documentation Program monitoring, documenting and mobilizing around the violent deaths of lesbians, gays and transgender people in the country. The... Read More →
avatar for Ayanda Msiza

Ayanda Msiza

Media and Documentation Officer, Iranti Org
Ayanda Msiza is Iranti-Org's Media and Documentation Officer. | | Iranti-org is a queer human rights visual media organization based in Johannesburg, South Africa. Iranti-org works within a human rights framework as its foundational platform for raising issues on Gender, Identities and Sexuality. Founded in January 2012 by Human Rights activist, photographer and curator, Jabu Pereira is formed with the clear intention of building local... Read More →
avatar for Lu Ortiz

Lu Ortiz

CEO and Founder, Nova México
Strategist, Communicator, Civic Entrepreneur, Tactical Trainer and Non violent political activist.
avatar for Azza Sultan

Azza Sultan

Founder & Executive Director, Mesahat Foundation for Sexual and Gender Diversity
Sudanese LGBT activist based in Cairo. The Founder & Executive Director of Mesahat Foundation for Sexual and Gender Diversity (An LGBT organization working in the Nile Valley Area "Egypt &Sudan").


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Nest

2:30pm

Reserved
TBA

Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Fishbowl

2:30pm

Net neutrality fights around the world
Leaders in the fight for internet freedom from around the world will come together to share their stories of change, biggest threats to net neutrality, and recommendations going forward. Audiences from different regions will be able connect with the panelists and learn about valuable campaigning and advocacy strategies that have gone into winning or moving us along towards net neutrality.

Moderators
TS

Taren Stinebrickner-Kaufman

Founder and Executive Director, Sumofus.org

Speakers
avatar for Carlos Brito

Carlos Brito

Advocacy Director, R3D
Director of Advocacy, @R3DMX
RK

Rosa Kouri

SumOfUs
avatar for Nikhil Pahwa

Nikhil Pahwa

co-Founder, SaveTheInternet.in
Founder and Editor - MediaNama.com; co-founder SavetheInternet.in/Internet Freedom Foundation
HW

Holmes Wilson

Co-founder and co-director, Fight for the Future


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Slate

2:30pm

Digital Dividends for the Bottom Billion: “Technology is at its best when it is inclusive”
"Technology is at its best when it is inclusive”

Digital technologies have spread rapidly in much of the world. Digital dividends - that is, the broader development benefits from using these technologies - have lagged behind. In many instances, digital technologies have boosted growth, expanded opportunities, and improved service delivery. Yet their aggregate impact has fallen short and is unevenly distributed. For digital technologies to benefit everyone everywhere requires closing the remaining digital divide, especially in Internet access. But greater digital adoption will not be enough. To get the most out of the digital revolution, countries also need to work on the “analog complements” - by strengthening regulations that ensure competition among businesses, by adapting workers’ skills to the demands of the new economy, and by ensuring that institutions are accountable. 

Join us for a launch event to discuss the key findings of the World Development Report to further our understanding of the role technology can play to harness Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for development and broadly to accelerate the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Speakers and Panelists:
  • Deepak Mishra, Co-Director, 2016 World Development Report, The World Bank
  • Danil Kerimi, Director, Digital Economy and Global Technology Policy, World Economic Forum
  • Gary FowlieHead, ITU Liaison Office to the United Nations
  • Mitchell Baker, Chairwoman, Mozilla Foundation and Corporation
  • Ephraim Percy Kenyanito, Sub Saharan African Policy Analyst, AccessNow
Conversation Moderated & Facilitated by: Ritu Sharma, CEO & Founder, Social Media for Nonprofits, SDG Nexus 

Key themes and takeaways:·  
  • How to leverage Internet powered technologies for greater good·      
  • Inclusion of women and traditionally under-represented in technology·      
  • Digital disruption by crowd sharing platforms like Uber, AirBnB·      
  • Net Neutrality and access to Internet·      
  • Role of NGOs and foundations in facilitating digital dividend distribution·      
  • Fourth Industrial Revolution, future of jobs·     
  • Tech’s role in addressing inequality 

Moderators
avatar for Ritu Sharma

Ritu Sharma

CEO, SDG Nexus and Social Media for Nonprofits
Ritu Sharma is the CEO of Social Media for Nonprofits, a global NGO bringing educational programs in information and communication technologies (ICT) to nonprofits worldwide through signature one-day conference series, webinars, content and online learning. She also spearheads the efforts of SDG Nexus, a multi-stakeholder digital development platform for leveraging ICT technologies for accelerating the implementation of the Sustainable... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mitchell Baker

Mitchell Baker

Chairwoman, Mozilla
Winifred Mitchell Baker, better known simply as Mitchell Baker, is the Executive Chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation and of Mozilla Corporation, a subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation that coordinates development of the open source Mozilla Internet applications, including the Mozilla Firefox web browser and the Mozilla Thunderbird email client. | | Baker was trained as a lawyer. She coordinates business and policy issues and sits on both the... Read More →
GF

Gary Fowlie

Head, ITU Liaison Office to the United Nations
Head, ITU Liaison Office to the United Nations
avatar for Danil Kerimi

Danil Kerimi

Digital Economy and Global Technology Policy,, World Economic Forum
Danil Kerimi is currently leading the World Economic Forum’s work on Internet governance, evidence-based policy-making, digital economy, and industrial policy. In addition, he manages Global Agenda Council on Cybersecurity. Previously, Mr. Kerimi led Forum’s engagement with governments and business leaders in Europe and Central Asia, was in charge of developing the Forum’s global public sector outreach strategy on various... Read More →
avatar for Deepak Mishra

Deepak Mishra

Co-Director, World Development Report 2016
Deepak is a Lead Economist at the World Bank and the Co-director for the World Development Report 2016 on Internet and Development. Prior to this appointment, he was the Lead Economist for the East Asia and Pacific region, overseeing the work on economic policy and management. He has served as a Country Economist for Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Sudan, and Vietnam, leading the Bank's policy and analytical work on economic issues in these countries... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Cottage

2:30pm

Building Digital Safety for Journalists
Parallel to the growing digitization of journalism which brings unprecedented benefits to both producers and consumers of journalism, there are worrying trends that have emerged. UNESCO has released a research “Building Digital Safety for Journalism” and intend to trigger discussion on following crucial questions with participants:
1.What are major and emerged digital threats to journalists and media actors on Internet?
2.What kinds of gender-based harassment and threats have emerged and how to address them particularly?
3. What are existing actors and initiative working to address digital safety globally, regionally, nationally and locally?
4. What are gaps in knowledge and practices for protecting digital safety of journalists?
5. What enabling policy recommendations and good practices can be shared in this regard?

Background documents:

Link to UNESCO digital safety publication:
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/resources/publications-and-communication-materials/publications/full-list/building-digital-safety-for-journalism-a-survey-of-selected-issues/

Link to Outcome documents of UNESCO conference News organizations standing up for the safety of media professionals: http://en.unesco.org/safety-media-professionals

Moderator: Ms Xianhong Hu, UNESCO

Speakers (3-minutes each):
Mr Guy Berger: Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development, UNESCO
Mr David Kaye: UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression
Ms Courtney Radsch: Committee of Protecting Journalists
Ms Lisl Brunner: Policy & Learning Director of GNI (Global Network Initiative)
Representative from Facebook


Speakers
avatar for Guy Berger

Guy Berger

Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development, UNESCO
I am director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development at UNESCO. Oversee UNESCO's report "World Trends on Freedom of Expression and Media Development", and taking forward UNESCO Member States' agreement to the concept of Internet Universality, and options for Internet action on access to information & knowledge online; freedom of expression; privacy; and ethical dimensions of the Information Society... Read More →
XH

Xianhong Hu

Assistant Programme Specialist, Communication and Information Sector, UNESCO
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression, United Nations
Prof. Kaye’s scholarship and teaching focus on public international law, especially international human rights law, international humanitarian law, accountability for violations of human rights, and the law governing the use of force. He is just as interested in efforts to translate international law—especially human rights law—in a domestic American context, whether in courts, legislatures, or the executive branches of... Read More →
avatar for Courtney Radsch

Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch, USA, is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism and Citizen Journalism in Egypt: Digital Dissidence and Political Change. She has led advocacy missions to more than a dozen countries, U.N. bodies, and the... Read More →
avatar for Mark Stephens, CBE

Mark Stephens, CBE

Independent Board Chair, Global Network Initiative
Mark Stephens, CBE is the Independent Board Chair of the Global Network Initiative. A British lawyer specializing in international commercial dispute resolution, media law, human rights and intellectual property, Mark has undertaken some of the highest profile cases in the UK and around the world defending the free expression rights of artists, journalists, and the rights of online publishers in libel cases. He currently heads the international... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Lab

2:30pm

2:30pm

2:30pm

The Irancubator Civic Tech Creatathon
Okay, there will be no pizza, and we won't be here all night. But, if you want to bring one or two other people (or just yourself) and brainstorm for 45 minutes on an app that will build civil society in Iran, we have lemonade, $100 prize for each member of the winning team, and, most importantly, the results of our Community Needs Assessment that identified the challenges, and opportunities, in the most tech-savvy and politically active country in the Middle East. 

The Irancubator is a virtual tech accelerator founded by United For Iran which is assembling development teams to build "apps for good" for Iranians suffering under religious and personal persecution. Today's mini createathon is a compact version of Irancubator's 18th-month process that launches in May and will provide development teams with technical, financial and logistical support for app development. 

Bring your passion and energy for design, thinking and quick iteration, and we'll provide the data that you need to workshop a solution. And maybe walk away with 100 bucks to spend tonight on your fellow conference goers.

Moderators
Friday April 1, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
The Demo Room

4:00pm

Applying Rights-Respecting Policy: Hub Table Sessions
"Tor - Ask me anything! (off-the-record)"
ID: 256 — Nima Fatemi ( Member, The Tor Project and the Chief Technologist, Library Freedom Project.
Everything you always wanted to know about Tor but didn't know who or where to ask. In this off-the-record session, Nima will answer all of your questions about using Tor. From learning how to protect your anonymity, privacy and identity online to the basic tools necessary to run a Tor relay of your own and support the network. Nima will help you get started or expand upon the knowledge you may already have.

"Coalition this, coalition that: Building local networks for a global movement"
ID: 250 — Sana Saleem (Bolo Bhi)

"New meets Old [Media]: What online news can and can’t do for democracy"
ID: 197 — Panthea Lee (Principal & Co-Founder, Reboot)
Independent media plays a critical role in advancing good governance.The internet has democratized the sharing of information to an extent unimaginable 20 years ago, as social media and citizen journalism outlets spread. Yet in many parts of the world, media remains dominated by state-controlled channels. This session will explore the benefits and limitations of journalism on the web, with an emphasis on how media development can achieve the goals of transparent, accountable, and participatory government. Drawing on two case studies of media development and citizen engagement projects in Nigeria, Panthea will lead exercises to understand the needs of different potential “users” of news media, with an emphasis on news for empowerment and democracy. These interactive activities will give participants the tools to think through their own approaches to inspiring action from key audiences. The two “case studies” will include Reboot’s support of a Nigerian radio station’s first public interest program, and our recent engagement with the Omidyar Network to research the challenges facing media in West Africa.

"The implications of Hacking Team in Latin America"
ID: 228 — NGO Derecho Digitales

"What's an internet shutdown? Let's hack a definition to protect human rights and the economy."
ID: 798 — Deji Olukotun

Speakers
NF

Nima Fatemi

Member, The Tor Project and Chief Technologist, Library Freedom Project
avatar for Panthea Lee

Panthea Lee

Principal & Co-Founder, Reboot
Panthea specializes in the applications of ethnography, design, and technology in advancing inclusive development and accountable governance. She has led initiatives to improve human development outcomes in over 20 countries, including Afghanistan, Indonesia, Libya, and Nigeria. Her experience spans work on public sector reform, democratic transition, civic innovation, human trafficking, education, and financial inclusion. Reboot is a social... Read More →
avatar for Deji Olukotun

Deji Olukotun

Senior Global Advocacy Manager, Access Now
Deji Olukotun is the Senior Global Advocacy Manager for Access Now. As a member of the advocacy team, he manages Access Now's global campaigns to fight internet shutdowns, foster an open internet, protect digital privacy, and ensure that our fundamental rights are respected online. He came from the literary and human rights organization PEN American Center, where he founded PEN's digital freedom program and managed its capacity-building work in... Read More →
avatar for Claudio Ruiz

Claudio Ruiz

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Sana Saleem

Sana Saleem

Director, Bolo Bhi
Co-founder and Director of Bolo Bhi. I am reelance journalist, researcher, rights advocate and public policy consultant. I have written for Dawn, The Guardian and have been writing for Global Voices for the past five years, where I currently work as Editor for Pakistan. In 2012, I was listed among Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers for her work on free speech and was recognized for my work on #BBC100 women of 2014. I am also on the... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
*The Hub*

4:00pm

Building a Network of Progressive Institutional Investors
A small number of pioneering investors have started to demand answers and action by the directors of the world’s major tech and telecom companies. These investors recognise the financial risks and reputational damage that come when these companies fail to uphold digital rights. But they also see the key role that companies can play in protecting privacy and pushing back against government requests to restrict content online. 

Participants with government, corporate, and civil society backgrounds will share their lessons and learn from you. What messages and messengers do companies pay most attention to? How do campaigns effectively make use of inside and outside pressure to produce sustainable, effective policies and procedures? What issues are ripe for more cross-sector engagement? Strategize with all stakeholders on how to use the corporate governance machinery to improve respect for digital rights and create a more transparent, equitable, and accountable internet ecosystem.


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Slate

4:00pm

How Technology and Policy Have Been Essential to Environmental Justice in California
California has set the tone for the United States in movement on environmental causes, and organizers with experience from government institutions, nonprofit advocacy spaces, business development and technology development will discuss how their work intersects and depends on overlapping mechanisms to achieve environmental justice. Panelist backgrounds include a mixture of nonprofit digital organizing, legislative and policy crafting, private-­public collaboration, direct action, media outreach, social justice organizing, and market/commercial concerns as overlapping factors that need to align for the development of wide-scale change.

Since 1967, when California's Legislature established the Air Resources Board to work with the public, the business sector and local governments to find solutions to California's air pollution problem, California has set air quality standards and laid the groundwork to develop of new antismog technology for industrial facilities and motor vehicles.This legacy of leadership continues today with emission reduction targets far beyond the national goals. As the second largest producer of greenhouse gas emissions, the United States's per capita impact is almost unmatched and California's leadership in air quality standard is key to establishing the models and pathways for critical emission reductions.

Speakers
avatar for Urvi Nagrani

Urvi Nagrani

Director of Marketing and Business Development, Motiv Power Systems
In my current role I help Motiv in it's mission to displace diesel by building all-electric zero-emission powertrains for trucks and buses. I develop grant proposal to securing funding for early stage pilots, market to interested stakeholders, and support projects from proposal to completion. This work places me in a collaborative role with technologists, policy makers, environmental justice work, businesses and infrastructure development... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Ann Pinkerton

Lisa Ann Pinkerton

Founder & President, Technica Communications
From the newsroom to the boardroom, Lisa Ann has used her keen analytical skills to share technology stories with the world for over a decade. She is Founder and President of Technica Communications, Co-Founder and Marketing Chair for the Global Cleantech Cluster Association, Founder of the networking group Women In Cleantech & Sustainability, an international speaker and moderator and documentary filmmaker. e | | Technica Communications... Read More →


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Engine

4:00pm

All Power to the People or how to get your #right mind and your #freedoms.
What is the role of healing, wellness and radical self-care in building and sustaining liberation movements (we will examine LGBTQI and Black liberation movements specifically) and how does this impact communication strategies and media advocacy tools? What strategies exist that take an holistic approach to activism, self-care and resilience building? Trauma and violence, proximity to hostility and oppression – whether imposed directly or indirectly – necessarily influence our ability to communicate and collaborate, impacting the ways we approach and resolve conflict and our capacity to sustain ourselves, our organizations and ultimately, entire movements and communities.  Similarly, as we use technology as a tool to respond to the lack of access of resources or to embrace freedom in new ways, we can reify the experience of disembodiment, which is both a survival technique and trauma response. How can we be critically aware of the ways technology can be used to enhance liberation, or deepen systemic inequities.  Finally, how does the the health and wellbeing of the user inform these experiences. 

Drawing on the Astraea Foundation’s CommsLabs model & the wellness tracks from the Movement for Black Lives we will illustrate how one can be empowered or impaired based on personal resilience, introduced conflict, and other variables that present on a daily basis in the lives of LGBTQI & activists of color in hostile environments.

Speakers
avatar for J. Bob Alotta

J. Bob Alotta

Executive Director, Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice
Filmmaker and technologist turned Executive Director, J. Bob Alotta leads the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, an LGBTQI rights foundation working for social, racial, gender, and economic justice around the globe. Through film and at Astraea, Bob engages philanthropists, leaders, and community members to transform the marginalization of LGBTQI rights in our societies. Representing a new generation of social change philanthropists... Read More →
AU

Adaku Utah

Founder, Beatbox Botanicals and Harriet's Apothecary


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Lab

4:00pm

From Internet Nordeste to IG World - Meeting of Internet Governance Interest Groups after IGF2015 in Brazilian Northeast
We will talk about:
1) Who we are?

2) What we do?

3) What we want?
- Starting a regional training;
- Increase engagement and break down geographical barriers

4) How we think?

5) How will our region "North-Northeast of Brazil" empower the multipliers?

We include the following themes: Internet Governance, Human Rights, Freedom of Expression and Intellectual Property

Speakers
avatar for Rogelio

Rogelio

Security Incident Handler, Access Now
I am co-chair of The Demo Room at RightsCon 2016
avatar for Alyne Andrade

Alyne Andrade

President, IBDI (Brazilian Institute of Cyber Law)
Alyne de Andrade de Oliveira Bezerra. Lawyer, Master Degree in Intellectual Property from the Faculty of Law of Lisbon, president of the Brazilian Institute of Cyber Law (IBDI), coordinator in the area of Business Law at the School of Laweyrs (ESA) of OAB/PE (“Bar Association in Brazil”), member of the Commission on Intellectual Property OAB/PE (“Bar Association” in Brazil) and owner of the company Alyne Andrade – Trademarks and Patents... Read More →
avatar for Nathalia Foditsch

Nathalia Foditsch

Communications Law and Policy Specialist, American University
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Fireside

4:00pm

Zero Rating: “Access for all” Or Curbing Freedom of Expression?
According to ITU 2015 report, globally 3.2 billion people are using the Internet by end 2015, of which 2 billion are from developing countries. However, 4 billion people from developing countries remain offline, representing 2/3 of the population residing in developing countries. It is crucial to an increasingly global economy to bridge this vast digital divide by connecting the billions of people now without a voice. And, at first glance, organizations like Facebook’s Internet.org or Free Basics seem to strive to do just that. To date, their service has provided free access to a handful of cherry­picked web applications to thousands of users in parts of Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia.
However, there are debates going around that zero rating could harm competition in Internet Access Market and reduce diversity inexpression, due to the preference by the mobile operators for some content providers vs. others. This will also affect startups that are providing content services to grow and also suppress users’ freedom of choice of selecting services. It will be in form of debate that involve regulators from developed and developing countries, international organizations, representatives from academia, technical organizations and private sector. The focus will be on case studies and on the discussion of the specific characteristics of the markets in which these practices are used (two sided markets, modularity, high degree of market innovation) and on the evaluation of the case­by­case approach to zero rating suggested by some regulators. It will discuss also, whether competitive market forces would provide sufficient safeguards and how zero rating, by helping in designing better Internet adoption policies, could make more open and inclusive the Internet governance process.

Speakers
avatar for Pranesh Prakash

Pranesh Prakash

Policy Director, Centre for Internet and Society
Pranesh Prakash is a Policy Director at — and was part of the founding team of — the Centre for Internet and Society, a Bangalore-based non-profit that engages in research and policy advocacy. He is also the Legal Lead at Creative Commons India and an Affiliated Fellow at the Yale Law School's Information Society Project (formerly an A2K Fellow there), and has been on the Executive Committee of the NCUC at ICANN. In 2014 he was selected by... Read More →
avatar for Ritu Srivastava

Ritu Srivastava

Senior Programme Manager, Digital Empowerment Foundation
I am working with Digital Empowerment Foundation as Senior Programme Manager. Having experience in FoE, open spectrum; and gender and access issues.


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Nest

4:00pm

Closing the Gap on Global Connectivity

Today, 60 percent of the global population lacks Internet access. In the least developed countries only five percent of people, at most, are connected to the Internet. To close that gap, stakeholders are charged to accelerate progress towards affordable Internet access in the least developed countries within the next five years, through global commitments under the Sustainable Development Goals and the WSIS+10 Outcome Document.

In this session, Global Connect partners - including governments, civil society, and companies - will consult on the best strategies to move forward a common, worldwide goal:  to bring 1.5 billion people who lack Internet access online by 2020. We will explore questions such as:  What are best policies, narratives, and practices to reach the 2020 and 2030 goals? What is the Global Connect Initiative and its core stepping stones? What to ask and expect from the Multilateral Banks meeting occurring in April in Washington, DC? And, what is the role of Civil Society within this effort and how the technical community can help address the challenges? The session will be structured with a 30 minute presentation by a diverse set of longtime advocates, followed by 30 minutes of discussion. One possible goal is for RightsCon participants to ask Financial Ministers - core actors of the April Multilateral Banks Meeting -  to commit national investments on ICT infrastructure, broadband plans, and related.

Speakers
MB

Manu Bhardwaj

Senior Advisor, U.S. State Department
avatar for Karen McCabe

Karen McCabe

Senior Director Technology Policy, IEEE-SA
Senior Director of Technology Policy and International Affairs, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Leading efforts in the IEEE Internet Initiative, including the focal area of advancing solutions to connect the unconnected. For more information, please see: http://internetinitiative.ieee.org/. | I am also involved in technology ethics, notably in the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial... Read More →
avatar for Carolina Rossini

Carolina Rossini

VP of International Policy, Public Knowledge
2016 World Economic Forum Young Global Leader
SS

Suhas Subramanyam

Special Assistant, The White House, Office of Science and Technology Policy


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Cottage

4:00pm

Cross Border Data Requests
The existing legal framework for nations to make cross-border requests for data is fundamentally broken. Under current US law, foreign law enforcement officials seeking the content of stored electronic communications (e.g., emails) held by US-based Internet service providers (“providers”) must make a government-to-government request for the data (generally employing the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) process), even if the data is sought solely for the investigation of local crime. This is a notoriously slow process – taking an average of ten months. Foreign governments are understandably frustrated by this state of affairs and are responding in a number of undesirable ways, including increased reliance on data localization requirements, mandatory de-encryption regimes (i.e. mandatory backdoors), and reliance on other less transparent and less accountable means of accessing data.

Recent reports suggest that the U.S. and UK are negotiating an agreement that would respond to this problem by permitting UK officials to directly request data from U.S. providers in certain instances. Of concern, however, the agreement - as reported in the press - does not appear to impose meaningful procedural protections on the access to the data.

This workshop will continue the work already started in pushing for a privacy-protective framework for responding to such requests. We will focus in particular on possible reforms to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, as well as the implementation of bilateral and multilateral international agreements that seek to facilitate expedited access to legitimate requests for data while protecting privacy and related human rights over both the short and long-term

Speakers
avatar for Bertrand De La Chapelle

Bertrand De La Chapelle

Director, Internet & Jurisdiction Project
Director and Co-Founder of the Internet & Jurisdiction Project
avatar for Drew Mitnick

Drew Mitnick

Policy Counsel, Access Now
avatar for Greg Nojeim

Greg Nojeim

Director, Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy & Technology
United States surveillance laws, cross border law enforcement demands for Internet users' communications, UK IPB, encryption, cybersecurity and privacy
avatar for K.S. Park

K.S. Park

Co-Founder/ Professor, Open Net Korea/ Korea University Law School
Internet law, freedom of speech, privacy, Korean judiciary, net neutrality, film industry, antitrust, open government, copyright | Successful impact litigations - striking down Internet real-name law, "false news" crime, and Internet election regulation; holding telcos liable for data disclosure secrecy; holding a copyright society for bad faith takedown notice; and defending dissident bloggers from criminal defamation and insult laws and... Read More →
AW

Andrew Woods

Faculty, University of Kentucky Law School


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Bridge

4:00pm

4:00pm

Following the Paper Trail: Tech Demos and Lightning Talks
"Custom, Secure Data Collection Apps for Human Rights Defenders"
ID: 199 — John Higgins (Product Manager, Benetech Labs)
This session will showcase the secureApp generation platform developed by Benetech and currently in beta release. The secure app generation platform provides a public system for the creation of secure, multilingual, and open source data collection apps that will improve information management and reduce the risk of exposure for people in the field. These applications are built on top of the strong security of the Martus platform. By lowering the barrier to strong, open source encryption, this app will democratize technology and empower citizens. The system is quite different from alternatives as it is focused not on general app creation, but specifically on distributed information collection by or about vulnerable populations. In only a few hours, an organization could have its own free app, customized with that group’s name, branding and messaging. The session is an open request for feedback, and will include description of the design process, a demo of the platform itself, and some details of initial pilot projects.

"REAct: Digitally Documenting Human Rights-Related Barriers to HIV & Health Services"
ID: 297 — Collin Sullivan (Human Rights Program Associate, Benetech)
This session will discuss the REAct (Rights, Evidence, Action) program, a community­based system set up to monitor and respond to human rights­related barriers to HIV and health services. In 2015, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance (IHAA) partnered with Benetech to integrate Martus into their data collection and storage workflow to improve the security of their information and the privacy of their partners, clients, and anyone implicated or named in the data they collect. REAct is a global program, with implementations in Uganda, Myanmar, Senegal, Burundi, and elsewhere. In this talk, we hope to provide background on the program, including the sociopolitical and human rights­related needs it addresses, and discuss the reasons IHAA decided to use Martus for data collection and documentation. We'll discuss successes and challenges, and next steps for the program.

"

Transparency Toolkit"


ID: 51 —Transparency Toolkit
Even the most secretive institutions leave data trails through resumes, job listings, social media, contracts, and other public data sources. We are building free software to help journalists, activists, and researchers expose surveillance programs and human rights abuses with the same techniques intelligence agencies use to collect and analyze open data. Come see how our software works and some of the things we have found so far at this demo session.

"From Clutter to Clarity with UwaziDocs: Empowering Human Rights Organizations to Build and Share Knowledge Assets"
ID: 132 —  Jaume Cardona (Chief Technology Officer, HURIDOCS)
Does your organization work on human rights cases? Do you have large collections of case research buried in notebooks, Word and PDF documents, and sticky notes? Do you find it difficult to exchange valuable research with your staff and peers because of information bottlenecks? UwaziDocs, an open source, web-based, mobile friendly software designed for easy annotation, sharing, and publishing solves these problems. In Swahili, Uwazi means "open." HURIDOCS designed UwaziDocs to open up collaboration on key human rights documentation and unblock the obstacles to powerful advocacy and stronger litigation. It will become available to NGOs everywhere after its launch in Kenya in spring 2016. HURIDOCS will show how the tool works and walk the audience through a live demo. In a game format, audience members will be prompted to interact with each other by annotating a test instance and drawing connections between case documents. Winners will be dazzled by the magic of accelerated collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Jaume Cardona

Jaume Cardona

CTO, Huridocs
Chief Technology Officer at Huridocs, a Geneva based NGO helping human rights organizations with their information challenges.
JH

John Higgins

Product Manager, Benetech Labs
avatar for Collin Sullivan

Collin Sullivan

Human Rights Program Associate, Benetech
Benetech


Friday April 1, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
The Demo Room

5:15pm

Networks and Networking: Hub Table Sesions
"Cybersecurity, professional ethics and encryption: How and why professionals must encrypt"
ID: 174 — Jonathan Stribling-Uss, Esq. (Director, Constitutional Communications), Peter Micek, Esq. (Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now)
We have reached a tipping point on the issues of professional ethics, secure communications, and data security. From criminal defense or intellectual property attorneys attempting to maintain attorney client privledge, to library professionals assisting patrons with on-line research, all professionals are impacted by the new political and technological reality of multi-state mass surveillance technology. Overreaching government surveillance and expanded technical capacities have undermined the First, Fourth and Sixth amendment rights of all Americans and the Human Rights of people around the world. As the world’s highest legal official for counter-terrorism and human rights, the UN Special Rapporteur, concluded in a recent report on cybersecurity, “The hard truth is that the use of mass surveillance technology effectively does away with the right to privacy of communications on the Internet altogether.” In this session we will assist the public and professionals in understanding how to ethically engage with information technology in this new and challenging climate.

"Building a Communications Technology Rights Agenda"
ID: 85 — Rob Robinson (Session Facilitator, NESRI) Alfredo Lopez (May First/People Link) Jackie Smith (International Network of Scholar Activists)
We want to have a conversation to address some questions: what do you think we should prioritize in building an agenda for communications rights, particularly as pertains to the Internet...what themes, what actions? How to we fight surveillance and the associated threats to our privacy and data protection? May First/People Link is calling on their entire justice and change movement in the U.S. and Mexico to unite around a program to protect ourselves against Internet surveillance, privacy infringement, data theft and unprotected access. This hub is part of that process and will help orient it. Two participants will join this conversation remotely.

"Mashing up analogue and digital media for human rights in Iran"
ID: 140 — Saleem Vaillancourt (Deputy Director, #NotACrime)
#NotACrime is a global street art campaign started by Maziar Bahari to advocate for free expression and education equality in Iran. The Islamic Republic imposes ruthless censorship on journalists in Iran – and fifty reporters are in jail. The government also bars all Baha'is from teaching and studying at university. #NotACrime is midway through a project to paint murals in cities around the world to raise awareness of these human rights crises. The idea is to marry old school street art – paint on walls – with the new techniques of viral videos and social media.
We want to host a workshop where we share what we've achieved and learnt so far, for others to consider and adopt; and to discuss more ways, and better ways, that analogue media and social media can be combined for maximum impact in creating awareness.
We'll question the best analogue art forms to use, and the right social media platforms and techniques to extend out reach to the best audiences. Our hoped-for outcomes will be new ideas and strategies for everyone to use analogue arts combined with social media to further a human rights cause. The workshop will include a ""guided tour"" of the street art campaign to date, a reflection on the various challenges and problems encountered, a solicitation of similar experience from other participants, and a brainstorm on how to extend this analogue-digital dynamic to a new stage of activism. Saleem Vaillancourt, the campaign coordinator, will facilitate the session. 

"Information and Accessibility Justice for Deaf People in Digital Age : Good Practices and Recommendations"
ID: 302 — Valentina Sri Wijiyati -- Knowledge Management, Networking, and Media Dept. Staff, Satunama FoundationSatunama Foundation, volunteer of Deaf Art Community.

Session ID#302 will fall under the theme ‘Internet Governance and Digital Inclusion’ with 
subtopic ‘accessibility’. With the workshop format, session ID#302 will help the participants to 
understand the recent good practices of governments around the world in respect, protect, and fulfill deaf people’s right to information. The speakers from both Indonesia and United States of America will share their experience-assessment on their country status regarding information justice for deaf people. They will also present the challenges in policy advocacy and the stakeholder’s step in addressing those challenges. Based on speakers’ presentation, in the plenary session the participants will reflect their respective country experiences and the necessary next steps. These necessary next steps will address the law, the governance and law enforcement, and  the culture in the society. The increasing knowledge of the participants and the recap of stakeholders and countries’ good practices, combined with suggested steps by the participants will become the immediate output of the session. By their participation in the session, we expect civil society network (particularly people with disability organization / PDO network and human rights-people with disability organization network) could develop the stronger network and utilize it for sharing the resources. After the session and the whole RightsCon 2016 we expect civil society network (particularly People with Disability Organization network) could endorse the recommendations to the stakeholders in their respective country and beyond. 


Speakers
AL

Alfredo Lopez

May First/People Link
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now
RR

Rob Robinson

Session Facilitator, NESRI
JS

Jackie Smith

International Network of Scholar Activists
JS

Jonathan Stribling-Uss, Esq.

Director, Constitutional Communications
avatar for Valentina Sri Wijiyati

Valentina Sri Wijiyati

Knowledge Management, Networking, and Media Dept. Staff, Satunama Foundation
I am Staff at Satunama Foundation, volunteer at Deaf Art Community, Ethical Board at Yogyakarta Chapter of Alliance of Independent Journalist. I share my concern on (1) Total Tobacco Advertisement Promotion and Sponsorship (TAPS) Ban, (2) information and access justice for people with disability toward the entire media, information, and communication world, and (3) human rights approach in media, information, and communication world.


Friday April 1, 2016 5:15pm - 6:15pm
*The Hub*

5:15pm

Civil Society: In Pursuit of Internet Policy Progress
You’re an internet policy advocate: you’ve done some combination of research, analysis, campaign planning, and community building, you’ve liaised with the private and public spheres, you’ve spread your message as far as possible through many media, and in these many processes you’ve dealt with setbacks and learned from mistakes. Your experiences and knowledge could be invaluable to another internet policy practitioner, and theirs equally as useful to you.
Capitalizing on the convergence of so many internet policy advocates from around the world, this session will enable you to learn what worked and what didn’t from international colleagues striving to achieve internet freedom and respect for digital rights in their countries, and to share your own experiences as well. The roundtable will be open for you to discuss your ups and downs, your wins and losses, your setbacks and solutions, and future points of international collaboration.
After a brief introduction from each organization represented at the roundtable, a moderator from Internews will guide participants through an open discussion of methods, best practices, successes, and challenges faced by CSOs in